kachina

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ka·chi·na

 (kə-chē′nə) or kat·si·na (kə-chē′nə, kət-sē′-)
n.
1. Any of numerous deified ancestral spirits of the Pueblo peoples, believed to reside in the pueblo for part of each year.
2. A masked dancer believed to embody a particular spirit during a religious ceremony.
3. A carved doll in the costume of a particular spirit, usually presented as a gift to a child.

[Hopi katsina, supernatural being, masked impersonator of a supernatural being.]

kachina

(kəˈtʃiːnə)
n
(Non-European Myth & Legend) any of the supernatural beings believed by the Hopi Indians to be the ancestors of living humans
[from Hopi qačina supernatural]

ka•chi•na

or ka•tci•na

(kəˈtʃi nə)

n., pl. -nas.
1. any of a class of supernatural beings who play a role in the religious beliefs and rituals of Pueblo Indian peoples.
2. a masked dancer impersonating such a being.
3. a carved wooden doll representing a kachina.
[1885–90; < Hopi ḳacína]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kachina - a masked dancer during a Pueblo religious ceremony who is thought to embody some particular spirit
dancer, professional dancer, terpsichorean - a performer who dances professionally
2.kachina - a deified spirit of the Pueblo people
disembodied spirit, spirit - any incorporeal supernatural being that can become visible (or audible) to human beings
3.kachina - a carved doll wearing the costume of a particular Pueblo spirit; usually presented to a child as a gift
doll, dolly - a small replica of a person; used as a toy
References in periodicals archive ?
For a dance held midsummer, Preston adds, adult members of the tribe go into the Peaks to collect blue spruce boughs to adorn the kachina dancers, since blue spruce has the magnetic power to bring clouds and moisture.
Kachina dancers, representing Hopi rain gods, threw food and toys to a crowd in a ritual intended to bring rain and help the corn grow.
Spellbound, you'll watch as kachina dancers, immaculately adorned in masks, fir boughs, and leather moccasins, their skin painted with crushed minerals, enter the plaza and begin a long series of chants, songs, and dances of hypnotizing beauty.