kadaitcha


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kadaitcha

(kəˈdaɪtʃə)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) a variant spelling of kurdaitcha
References in periodicals archive ?
The Territory government felt it had already largely dealt with this issue in one of its own earlier legislative amendments, which prevented barristers from standing at the bar table and explaining to a judge how customary law ("The kadaitcha man made him do it, Your Honour" or "My client believed he had a right to touch his promised wife") had been a factor in an assault.
In 2002 I'd watched him give a young Aboriginal man a fully suspended sentence for burning a shed to the ground and severely clubbing various family members (including his dad, who lost an eye, and two small children) with an iron bar because Angel accepted an argument that a kadaitcha man had instructed him to do it.
Abstract: Apart from a single brief paper written by DS Davidson and published in 1947, and a detailed description of bark sandals from the Tanami desert region by DF Thomson in 1960, most attention in relation to Aboriginal Australian footwear has focused on the emu-feather and hairstring kadaitcha shoes or slippers of Central Australia.
While traditionally footwear had a limited distribution on the continent, the use of at least one form intimately associated with magical killing and sorcery, the kadaitcha shoe, seems to have been spreading in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
Three types were believed to have been of very limited distribution, while the fourth, the kadaitcha shoe, was found over a much wider area and considered by Davidson as having spread in a south-westerly direction since first recorded in Central Australia in the last decade of the nineteenth century.
In Central Australia, such people are called by the more familiar name, kadaitcha or kurdaitcha, a word that has now entered the general Australian vocabulary.
With soles made from emu feathers and uppers of knitted or woven twine of human hair or animal fur, kadaitcha shoes are the most familiar form of footwear used by Aboriginal Australians.
The manufacture of kadaitcha shoes for sale seems to have begun soon after they were first reported.
Part of the ritual involved in preparing a man to be a kadaitcha involved dislocation of one or other little toe (Spencer & Gillen 1899:478).
The literature relating to kadaitcha practices is extensive and will not be entered into here (see Berndt & Berndt 1977:324-6; Curr 1886:148; Etheridge 1895; Kitching 1961; Spencer & Gillen 1899:476-85).
Davidson (1947:116-18) described the use of such footwear as restricted to the southern sections of the Northern Territory and from South Australia, west of Lake Eyre, extending into Western Australia; in Western Australia the use of the kadaitcha shoe was limited to the Gibson Desert, extending south-east into the Eastern Goldfields region and north-east into the northern Pilbara.
Yet even there, even in Sam Watson's The Kadaitcha Sung, I, an Egyptian-born American, felt the intimacy of my own desire, pain, mortality.