Kantian

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Kant

 (kănt, känt), Immanuel 1724-1804.
German philosopher whose synthesis of rationalism and empiricism, in which he argued that reason is the means by which the phenomena of experience are translated into understanding, inspired 19th-century German idealism. His classic works include Critique of Pure Reason (1781) and Critique of Practical Reason (1788), in which he put forward a system of ethics based on the categorical imperative.

Kant′i·an adj. & n.

Kantian

(ˈkæntɪən)
adj
(Philosophy) (of a philosophical theory) derived from or analogous to a position of Immanuel Kant, esp his doctrines that there are synthetic a priori propositions which order our experience but are not derived from it, that metaphysical conclusions can be inferred from the nature of possible experience, that duty is to be done for its own sake and not as a means to any other end, and that there is a world of things-in-themselves to be distinguished from mere phenomena. See also transcendental argument, transcendental idealism, categorical imperative, noumenon
ˈKantianˌism, ˈKantism n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Kantian - of or relating to Immanuel Kant or his philosophy
Translations
Kantianerin

Kantian

[ˈkæntɪən]
A. ADJkantiano
B. Nkantiano/a m/f
References in periodicals archive ?
It is as if the mind revealed its resilience in the face of the Kantianly sublime moment that was initially incomprehensible yet that ultimately yielded to cognition.
Deconstruction is Kantianly theological in its alertness to the call of "unconditionality" (Limited Inc.