karakia


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karakia

(ˌkɑːrəˈkiːə)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) NZ a prayer
[Māori]
References in periodicals archive ?
At dawn each day, when night shift hands over to day shift, staff gather and take turns to recite a karakia, to raise their wairua and prepare them for the day ahead.
Ahua: Use te reo Maori,as led by client/whanau Tikanga: Use whakatau protocol as requested by client Tikanga: Identify client/whanau preference for karakia and facilitate when required
Throughout the week, the children learn the haka, waiata, karakia and Maori protocols.
In NZ, for instance, mealtimes typically begin with a karakia (Maori prayer giving thanks for the food) which all children are expected to participate in.
They came together with Transport Agency and Swap Contractors in a poignant karakia to bless the commencement of the construction work.
Goldie, for example, states that Maori invoked the god Maru to 'descend upon the crown of the head (the most sacred part of the body) of the injured person, and apply his healing power to the wound or the injured limb' while repeating an ancient karakia [incantation] originally used to 'raise Rakei from the dead' (Goldie 1903, p.
36) The Tribunal cited a range of evidence pointing towards the reef's 'considerable' cultural, spiritual and historical importance for a range of hapii and iwi groups: this evidence included the name 'Te taunga o ta iti te tangata' (the resting place of the people) given by the first Maori settlers; its historic use as a navigational point and fishing ground; the Motiti belief that Otaiti is 'the beginning of the pathway home to our ancestors'; and the offering of karakia (prayers) to 'acknowledge the life force or mauri of the reef' as a source of sustenance.
The educational sessions used hui (meeting) protocols and cultural processes, such as starting and ending with karakia (prayers), waiata (songs) and sharing kai.
Secondly, Maxwell's own published research on the FGC process contained criticisms by Maori FGC participants with the tokenistic way in which Maori culture was afforded space in the process by state officials, usually confined to allowing elders to recite karakia (prayer) at the beginning and end of the process (see Morris & Maxwell, 1993; Maxwell et al.
In pre-European times, the felling of trees was strictly controlled by the Maori, and karakia (prayers) were offered before their use.
For example, the client had no desire to perform a karakia (prayer) before meals, but this was a ritual that I had practised from a young age.