keel


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Related to keel: keel over, even keel

keel 1

 (kēl)
n.
1. Nautical
a. The principal structural member of a boat or ship, running along the center of the hull from bow to stern, to which the ribs are attached.
b. A projecting ridge or fin on the bottom of the hull of a boat or ship that improves directional control and is often weighted for added stability.
2. The principal structural member of an aircraft, resembling a ship's keel in shape and function.
3. A structure, such as the breastbone of a bird, that resembles a ship's keel in function or shape.
4. A pair of united petals in certain flowers, as those of many members of the pea family.
intr. & tr.v. keeled, keel·ing, keels Nautical
To capsize or cause to capsize.
Phrasal Verb:
keel over
To collapse or fall into or as if into a faint.

[Middle English kele, from Old Norse kjölr.]

keel 2

 (kēl)
n.
1. Nautical
a. A sail-powered barge, especially one historically used on the rivers of northern England.
b. The load capacity of this barge.
2. A British unit of weight formerly used for coal, equal to about 21.2 long tons.

[Middle English kele, from Middle Dutch kiel.]

keel 3

 (kēl)
tr.v. keeled, keel·ing, keels Chiefly British
To make cool.

[Middle English kelen, from Old English cēlan, to cool; see gel- in Indo-European roots.]

keel

(kiːl)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) one of the main longitudinal structural members of a vessel to which the frames are fastened and that may extend into the water to provide lateral stability
2. on an even keel well-balanced; steady
3. (Aeronautics) any structure corresponding to or resembling the keel of a ship, such as the central member along the bottom of an aircraft fuselage
4. (Biology) biology a ridgelike part; carina
5. a poetic word for ship
vb
to capsize
[C14: from Old Norse kjölr; related to Middle Dutch kiel, keel2]
ˈkeel-less adj

keel

(kiːl)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a flat-bottomed vessel, esp one used for carrying coal
2. (Units) a measure of coal equal to about 21 tons
[C14 kele, from Middle Dutch kiel; compare Old English cēol ship]

keel

(kiːl)
n
red ochre stain used for marking sheep, timber, etc
vb (tr)
to mark with this stain
[Old English cēlan, from cōl cool]

keel

(kiːl)
vb
an archaic word for cool
[C15: probably from Scottish Gaelic cīl]

keel

(kiːl)
n
(Veterinary Science) a fatal disease of young ducks, characterized by intestinal bleeding caused by Salmonella bacteria
[C19: from keel1; see keel over]

keel1

(kil)
n.
1. a central fore-and-aft structural member in the bottom of a ship's hull extending from the stem to the sternpost.
2. a ship; boat.
3. a part corresponding to a ship's keel in some other structure, as in a dirigible balloon.
4. (cap.) the constellation Carina.
5. carina.
v.t., v.i.
6. to turn or upset so as to bring the wrong side or part uppermost.
7. keel over,
a. to capsize or overturn.
b. to fall in or as if in a faint.
Idioms:
on an even keel, in a steady, stable, or calm state.
[1325–75; Middle English kele < Old Norse kjǫlr]
keeled, adj.

keel2

(kil)

n. Brit. Dial.
a flat-bottomed barge, used to carry coal.
[1375–1425; late Middle English kele < Middle Dutch kiel ship; c. Old English cēol ship, Old Saxon kiol]

keel


Past participle: keeled
Gerund: keeling

Imperative
keel
keel
Present
I keel
you keel
he/she/it keels
we keel
you keel
they keel
Preterite
I keeled
you keeled
he/she/it keeled
we keeled
you keeled
they keeled
Present Continuous
I am keeling
you are keeling
he/she/it is keeling
we are keeling
you are keeling
they are keeling
Present Perfect
I have keeled
you have keeled
he/she/it has keeled
we have keeled
you have keeled
they have keeled
Past Continuous
I was keeling
you were keeling
he/she/it was keeling
we were keeling
you were keeling
they were keeling
Past Perfect
I had keeled
you had keeled
he/she/it had keeled
we had keeled
you had keeled
they had keeled
Future
I will keel
you will keel
he/she/it will keel
we will keel
you will keel
they will keel
Future Perfect
I will have keeled
you will have keeled
he/she/it will have keeled
we will have keeled
you will have keeled
they will have keeled
Future Continuous
I will be keeling
you will be keeling
he/she/it will be keeling
we will be keeling
you will be keeling
they will be keeling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been keeling
you have been keeling
he/she/it has been keeling
we have been keeling
you have been keeling
they have been keeling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been keeling
you will have been keeling
he/she/it will have been keeling
we will have been keeling
you will have been keeling
they will have been keeling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been keeling
you had been keeling
he/she/it had been keeling
we had been keeling
you had been keeling
they had been keeling
Conditional
I would keel
you would keel
he/she/it would keel
we would keel
you would keel
they would keel
Past Conditional
I would have keeled
you would have keeled
he/she/it would have keeled
we would have keeled
you would have keeled
they would have keeled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.keel - a projection or ridge that suggests a keel
projection - any solid convex shape that juts out from something
2.keel - the median ridge on the breastbone of birds that fly
carinate, carinate bird, flying bird - birds having keeled breastbones for attachment of flight muscles
carina - any of various keel-shaped structures or ridges such as that on the breastbone of a bird or that formed by the fused petals of a pea blossom
3.keel - one of the main longitudinal beams (or plates) of the hull of a vessel; can extend vertically into the water to provide lateral stability
beam - long thick piece of wood or metal or concrete, etc., used in construction
bilge keel - either of two lengthwise fins attached along the outside of a ship's bilge; reduces rolling
fin keel - a metal plate projecting from the keel of a shallow vessel to give it greater lateral stability
hull - the frame or body of ship
Verb1.keel - walk as if unable to control one's movements; "The drunken man staggered into the room"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
Translations
عارِضَه رئيسيَّه
kýl
køl
kiil
köli
hajógerinctõkesúly
kjölur
carina
laikytis ramiailaikytis šaltakraujiškai
ķīlis
kýl
gredelj
gemi omurgasıomurga

keel

[kiːl] N (Naut) → quilla f
on an even keel (Naut) → en iguales calados (fig) → en equilibrio, estable
to keep sth on an even keel [+ economy, company] → estabilizar algo
they managed to get their marriage back on an even keelconsiguieron volver a estabilizar su matrimonio
keel over VI + ADV (Naut) → volcar(se), zozobrar; [building, structure] → derrumbarse, venirse abajo; [person] → desplomarse

keel

[ˈkiːl] n
[boat] → quille f
on an even keel (fig)à flot
to keep sb/sth on an even keel (financially)maintenir qn/qch à flot
Most governments are able to keep their economies on an even keel → La plupart des gouvernements sont capables de maintenir à flot leur économie.
the medicines which kept him on an even keel (psychologically)les médicaments qui lui permettaient de continuer à fonctionner
to get sth back on an even keel (= re-establish equilibrium in) → remettre qch à flot
keel over
vi
[person] → s'écrouler
[ship] → chavirer

keel

n (Naut) → Kiel m; to be back on an even keel (lit)sich wieder aufgerichtet haben; he put the business back on an even keeler brachte das Geschäft wieder ins Lot or wieder auf die Beine (inf); when things are on a more even keelwenn sich alles besser eingespielt hat

keel

[kiːl] n (Naut) → chiglia
on an even keel (Naut) → di pescaggio uniforme
to keep things on an even keel (fig) → mantenere un certo equilibrio
keel over vi + adv (person) → crollare (Naut) → capovolgersi

keel

(kiːl) noun
the long supporting piece of a ship's frame that lies lengthwise along the bottom. The boat's keel stuck in the mud near the shore.
keel over
to fall over usually suddenly or unexpectedly eg in a faint.
be/keep on an even keel
to be, keep or remain in a calm and untroubled state.
References in classic literature ?
It is difficult for a seaman to believe that his stranded ship does not feel as unhappy at the unnatural predicament of having no water under her keel as he is himself at feeling her stranded.
It is as if an invisible hand had been stealthily uplifted from the bottom to catch hold of her keel as it glides through the water.
THE Gallant Crew at a life-saving station were about to launch their life-boat for a spin along the coast when they discovered, but a little distance away, a capsized vessel with a dozen men clinging to her keel.
Unloosed from their lashing by the constant turning and twisting of the ship and the force of the wind, the boarding and landing tackle had been trailing beneath the keel, a tangled mass of cordage and leather.
The Vanator now rested upon an even keel as she was carried along by a strong, though steady, wind.
So close did the monster come to the hull, that at first it seemed as if he meant it malice; but suddenly going down in a maelstrom, within three rods of the planks, he wholly disappeared from view, as if diving under the keel.
The boat in which Cook was struck on a rock, and, if it did not sink, it was owing to a piece of coral that was broken by the shock, and fixed itself in the broken keel.
The Captain must be very sure of his route, for I see there pieces of coral that would do for its keel if it only touched them slightly.
But in that gale, the port, the land, is that ship's direst jeopardy; she must fly all hospitality; one touch of land, though it but graze the keel, would make her shudder through and through.
It stood in a small side room which looked out across a narrow grass plot toward the shed, where there was a disabled boat lying keel upward.
Robert was out there under the shed, reclining in the shade against the sloping keel of the overturned boat.
Borckman and the black steersman echoed his words, and, as the wheel spun down, the Arangi, with the swiftness of a witch, rounded into the wind and attained a momentary even keel to the flapping of her headsails and a shifting of headsheets.