keep back


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Related to keep back: keep up

keep back

vb
1. (tr) to refuse to reveal or disclose
2. to prevent, be prevented, or refrain from advancing, entering, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.keep back - keep under control; keep in check; "suppress a smile"; "Keep your temper"; "keep your cool"
hold - keep from exhaling or expelling; "hold your breath"
confine - prevent from leaving or from being removed
bottle up, suppress, inhibit - control and refrain from showing; of emotions, desires, impulses, or behavior
curb, hold in, control, moderate, contain, check, hold - lessen the intensity of; temper; hold in restraint; hold or keep within limits; "moderate your alcohol intake"; "hold your tongue"; "hold your temper"; "control your anger"
2.keep back - secure and keep for possible future use or application; "The landlord retained the security deposit"; "I reserve the right to disagree"
keep, hold on - retain possession of; "Can I keep my old stuffed animals?"; "She kept her maiden name after she married"
hold down - keep; "She manages to hold down two jobs"
3.keep back - hold back; refuse to hand over or share; "The father is withholding the allowance until the son cleans his room"
immobilise, immobilize, freeze, block - prohibit the conversion or use of (assets); "Blocked funds"; "Freeze the assets of this hostile government"
deny, refuse - refuse to let have; "She denies me every pleasure"; "he denies her her weekly allowance"
keep to oneself - withhold information; "I kept your little secret to myself all these years"
deny - refuse to grant, as of a petition or request; "The dean denied the students' request for more physics courses"; "the prisoners were denied the right to exercise for more than 2 hours a day"
reserve - hold back or set aside, especially for future use or contingency; "they held back their applause in anticipation"
immobilise, immobilize - hold as reserve or withdraw from circulation; of capital
deprive - keep from having, keeping, or obtaining

keep

verb
1. To have and maintain in one's possession:
2. To have for sale:
3. To supply with the necessities of life:
Idiom: take care of.
4. To have or put in a customary place:
5. To remain fresh and unspoiled:
6. To persevere in some condition, action, or belief:
7. To control, restrict, or arrest:
8. To hold oneself back:
9. To reserve for the future:
10. To carry out the functions, requirements, or terms of:
Idiom: live up to.
11. To act in conformity with:
Idiom: toe the line.
12. To mark (a day or an event) with ceremonies of respect, festivity, or rejoicing:
phrasal verb
keep back
1. To have and maintain in one's possession:
2. To control, restrict, or arrest:
phrasal verb
keep off
To turn or drive away:
phrasal verb
keep on
To continue without halting despite difficulties or setbacks:
Idioms: hang in there, keep going , keep it up.
phrasal verb
keep out
To keep from being admitted, included, or considered:
phrasal verb
keep up
To keep in a condition of good repair, efficiency, or use:
noun
2. A place for the confinement of persons in lawful detention:
Informal: lockup, pen.
Chiefly Regional: calaboose.
Translations
يُبْعِد، يَبْتَعِديُخْفي، يَحْبِس، لا يَكْشِفيَدَّخِر، يَحْتَفِظ به، لا يَصْرِف
holde tilbagetilbageholde
távol álltávol tart
aî segja ekki alla sögunahalda eftirhalda sig fjarri/frá
dávať bokomdržať vzadu
alıkoymakgeri durmakgizlemeködememeksöylememek

keep

(kiːp) past tense, past participle kept (kept) verb
1. to have for a very long or indefinite period of time. He gave me the picture to keep.
2. not to give or throw away; to preserve. I kept the most interesting books; Can you keep a secret?
3. to (cause to) remain in a certain state or position. I keep this gun loaded; How do you keep cool in this heat?; Will you keep me informed of what happens?
4. to go on (performing or repeating a certain action). He kept walking.
5. to have in store. I always keep a tin of baked beans for emergencies.
6. to look after or care for. She keeps the garden beautifully; I think they keep hens.
7. to remain in good condition. That meat won't keep in this heat unless you put it in the fridge.
8. to make entries in (a diary, accounts etc). She keeps a diary to remind her of her appointments; He kept the accounts for the club.
9. to hold back or delay. Sorry to keep you.
10. to provide food, clothes, housing for (someone). He has a wife and child to keep.
11. to act in the way demanded by. She kept her promise.
12. to celebrate. to keep Christmas.
noun
food and lodging. She gives her mother money every week for her keep; Our cat really earns her keep – she kills all the mice in the house.
ˈkeeper noun
1. a person who looks after something, eg animals in a zoo. The lion has killed its keeper.
2. a goalkeeper.
ˈkeeping noun
care or charge. The money had been given into his keeping.
ˌkeep-ˈfit noun
a series or system of exercises, usually simple, intended to improve the physical condition of ordinary people, especially women. She's very keen on keep-fit but it doesn't do her much good; (also adjective) keep-fit exercises.
ˈkeepsake (-seik) noun
something given or taken to be kept in memory of the giver. She gave him a piece of her hair as a keepsake.
for keeps
permanently. You can have this necklace for keeps.
in keeping with
suited to. He has moved to a house more in keeping with his position as a headmaster.
keep away
to (cause to) remain at a distance. Keep away – it's dangerous!
keep back
1. not to (allow to) move forward. She kept the child back on the edge of the crowd; Every body keep back from the door!
2. not to tell or make known. I feel he's keeping the real story back for some reason.
3. not to give or pay out. Part of my allowance is kept back to pay for my meals; Will they keep it back every week?
keep one's distance
to stay quite far away. The deer did not trust us and kept their distance.
keep down
1. not to (allow to) rise up. Keep down – they're shooting at us!
2. to control or put a limit on. They are taking steps to keep down the rabbit population.
3. to digest without vomiting. He has eaten some food but he won't be able to keep it down.
keep one's end up
to perform one's part in something just as well as all the others who are involved.
keep from
to stop oneself from (doing something). I could hardly keep from hitting him.
keep going
to go on doing something despite difficulties.
keep hold of
not to let go of. Keep hold of those tickets!
keep house (for)
to do the cooking, housework etc (for). She keeps house for her brother.
keep in
1. not to allow to go or come out or outside. The teacher kept him in till he had finished the work.
2. to stay close to the side of a road etc.
keep in mind
to remember and take into consideration later.
keep it up
to carry on doing something at the same speed or as well as one is doing it at present. Your work is good – keep it up!
keep off
1. to stay away. There are notices round the bomb warning people to keep off; The rain kept off and we had sunshine for the wedding.
2. to prevent from getting to or on to (something). This umbrella isn't pretty, but it keeps off the rain.
keep on
to continue (doing something or moving). He just kept on writing; They kept on until they came to a petrol station.
keep oneself to oneself
to tell others very little about oneself, and not to be very friendly or sociable.
keep out
not to (allow to) enter. The notice at the building site said `Keep out!'; This coat keeps out the wind.
keep out of
not to become involved in. Do try to keep out of trouble!
keep time
(of a clock etc) to show the time accurately. Does this watch keep (good) time?
keep to
not to leave or go away from. Keep to this side of the park!; We kept to the roads we knew.
keep (something) to oneself
not to tell anyone (something). He kept his conclusions to himself.
keep up
1. to continue, or cause to remain, in operation. I enjoy our friendship and try to keep it up.
2. (often with with) to move fast enough not to be left behind (by). Even the children managed to keep up; Don't run – I can't keep up with you.
keep up with the Joneses (ˈdʒounziz)
to have everything one's neighbours have. She didn't need a new cooker – she just bought one to keep up with the Joneses.
keep watch
to have the task of staying alert and watching for danger.
References in classic literature ?
There is one thing that it would be very wrong to keep back from you.
The Prince," her husband answered coldly, "can keep back his information for a few minutes.
I cannot quite keep back the tears from my eyes when I think of my poor Maggy, and of the blank she must have felt at first, however kind they all are to her, without her Little Mother.
First, she dreamed of little Alice herself, and once again the tiny hands were clasped upon her knee, and the bright eager eyes were looking up into hers--she could hear the very tones of her voice, and see that queer little toss of her head to keep back the wandering hair that WOULD always get into her eyes--and still as she listened, or seemed to listen, the whole place around her became alive the strange creatures of her little sister's dream.
She said: 'I have always enjoyed keeping active and I'm aware that it's a great way to keep back pain at bay.
Keep back and wrist posture in neutral position when keyboarding;
A spokesman for Coventry City Council insisted this was normal practice, saying: "It is a retention from the construction work which means you keep back some of the money for 12 months until you are satisfied that everything it should be.