keeper


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keep·er

 (kē′pər)
n.
1. One that keeps, especially:
a. An attendant, a guard, or a warden.
b. One that has the charge or care of something: a lion keeper; the keeper of the budget.
c. A stationary fitting that catches or holds a moving part such as a latch or bolt.
d. Sports A goalkeeper.
2. Football A play made by the quarterback who keeps the ball after it is snapped and then runs with it.
3. Informal One that is worth keeping, especially a fish large enough to be legally caught and not returned to the water.

keeper

(ˈkiːpə)
n
1. a person in charge of animals, esp in a zoo
2. a person in charge of a museum, collection, or section of a museum
3. a person in charge of other people, such as a warder in a jail
4. (General Sporting Terms) See goalkeeper, wicketkeeper, gamekeeper
5. a person who keeps something
6. a device, such as a clip, for keeping something in place
7. (General Physics) a soft iron or steel bar placed across the poles of a permanent magnet to close the magnetic circuit when it is not in use
ˈkeeperless adj
ˈkeeperˌship n

keep•er

(ˈki pər)

n.
1. a person who guards or watches, as a prison warden.
2. a guardian.
3. a person who owns or operates a business: a hotelkeeper.
4. a person responsible for the maintenance of something: a zookeeper.
5. a person responsible for the preservation and conservation of something valuable, as a curator or game warden.
6. a fish large enough to be caught and retained lawfully.
7. a football play in which the quarterback runs with the ball.
8. something that serves to hold in place, retain, etc.
[1250–1300]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.keeper - someone in charge of other peoplekeeper - someone in charge of other people; "am I my brother's keeper?"
defender, guardian, protector, shielder - a person who cares for persons or property
baby farmer - someone who runs an establishment that houses and cares for babies for a fee
baby minder, babyminder, minder - a person who looks after babies (usually in the person's own home) while the babys' parents are working
babysitter, baby-sitter, sitter - a person engaged to care for children when the parents are not home
gaoler, jailer, jailor, prison guard, screw, turnkey - someone who guards prisoners
nanny, nursemaid, nurse - a woman who is the custodian of children
2.keeper - one having charge of buildings or grounds or animalskeeper - one having charge of buildings or grounds or animals
defender, guardian, protector, shielder - a person who cares for persons or property
caretaker - a custodian who is hired to take care of something (property or a person)
conservator, curator - the custodian of a collection (as a museum or library)
game warden, gamekeeper - a person employed to take care of game and wildlife
greenskeeper - someone responsible for the maintenance of a golf course
house sitter - a custodian who lives in and cares for a house while the regular occupant is away (usually without an exchange of money)
janitor - someone employed to clean and maintain a building
lighthouse keeper - the keeper of a lighthouse
critter sitter, pet sitter - someone left in charge of pets while their owners are away from home
zoo keeper - the chief person responsible for a zoological garden

keeper

noun (Informal)
1. goalkeeper, stopper (informal), goalie (informal) The Portuguese keeper made one of the most remarkable saves
2. curator, guardian, steward, superintendent, attendant, caretaker, overseer, preserver the keeper of the library at the V&A

keeper

noun
A person who is legally responsible for the person or property of another considered by law to be incompetent to manage his or her affairs:
Translations
حارِس المَرْمىحارِس، مُحافِظ
=-passerdyrepassermålmand
őrző
vörîur, gæslumaîur
čuvajvratar

keeper

[ˈkiːpəʳ] N (in park, zoo etc) → guarda mf, guardián/ana m/f; (= gamekeeper) → guardabosque mf, guardabosques mf inv; (in museum, art gallery) → conservador(a) m/f; (= goalkeeper) → portero/a m/f, arquero/a m/f (LAm)
am I my brother's keeper? (Bible) → ¿acaso soy el guarda de mi hermano?

keeper

[ˈkiːpər] ngardien(ne) m/f
I'm not his keeper (= not responsible) → je ne suis pas sa mèrekeep-fit [ˌkiːpˈfɪt] ngymnastique f de maintien, remise f en forme keep fit classkeep fit class ncours m de remise en forme
I go to keep-fit classes → Je vais à des cours de remise en forme., Je vais à des cours de gymnastique de maintien.

keeper

n (in asylum, zoo) → Wärter(in) m(f), → Pfleger(in) m(f), → Betreuer(in) m(f); (of museum)Kustos m, → Kustode m, → Kustodin f; (= guard)Wächter(in) m(f), → Aufseher(in) m(f), → Aufpasser(in) m(f); (Brit inf: = goalkeeper) → Torhüter(in) m(f); I’m not my brother’s keeperich bin nicht der Hüter meines Bruders

keeper

[ˈkiːpəʳ] n
a. (in park, zoo) → guardiano; (in museum) → custode m
b. (also gamekeeper) → guardacaccia m inv
c. (also goalkeeper) → portiere m

keep

(kiːp) past tense, past participle kept (kept) verb
1. to have for a very long or indefinite period of time. He gave me the picture to keep.
2. not to give or throw away; to preserve. I kept the most interesting books; Can you keep a secret?
3. to (cause to) remain in a certain state or position. I keep this gun loaded; How do you keep cool in this heat?; Will you keep me informed of what happens?
4. to go on (performing or repeating a certain action). He kept walking.
5. to have in store. I always keep a tin of baked beans for emergencies.
6. to look after or care for. She keeps the garden beautifully; I think they keep hens.
7. to remain in good condition. That meat won't keep in this heat unless you put it in the fridge.
8. to make entries in (a diary, accounts etc). She keeps a diary to remind her of her appointments; He kept the accounts for the club.
9. to hold back or delay. Sorry to keep you.
10. to provide food, clothes, housing for (someone). He has a wife and child to keep.
11. to act in the way demanded by. She kept her promise.
12. to celebrate. to keep Christmas.
noun
food and lodging. She gives her mother money every week for her keep; Our cat really earns her keep – she kills all the mice in the house.
ˈkeeper noun
1. a person who looks after something, eg animals in a zoo. The lion has killed its keeper.
2. a goalkeeper.
ˈkeeping noun
care or charge. The money had been given into his keeping.
ˌkeep-ˈfit noun
a series or system of exercises, usually simple, intended to improve the physical condition of ordinary people, especially women. She's very keen on keep-fit but it doesn't do her much good; (also adjective) keep-fit exercises.
ˈkeepsake (-seik) noun
something given or taken to be kept in memory of the giver. She gave him a piece of her hair as a keepsake.
for keeps
permanently. You can have this necklace for keeps.
in keeping with
suited to. He has moved to a house more in keeping with his position as a headmaster.
keep away
to (cause to) remain at a distance. Keep away – it's dangerous!
keep back
1. not to (allow to) move forward. She kept the child back on the edge of the crowd; Every body keep back from the door!
2. not to tell or make known. I feel he's keeping the real story back for some reason.
3. not to give or pay out. Part of my allowance is kept back to pay for my meals; Will they keep it back every week?
keep one's distance
to stay quite far away. The deer did not trust us and kept their distance.
keep down
1. not to (allow to) rise up. Keep down – they're shooting at us!
2. to control or put a limit on. They are taking steps to keep down the rabbit population.
3. to digest without vomiting. He has eaten some food but he won't be able to keep it down.
keep one's end up
to perform one's part in something just as well as all the others who are involved.
keep from
to stop oneself from (doing something). I could hardly keep from hitting him.
keep going
to go on doing something despite difficulties.
keep hold of
not to let go of. Keep hold of those tickets!
keep house (for)
to do the cooking, housework etc (for). She keeps house for her brother.
keep in
1. not to allow to go or come out or outside. The teacher kept him in till he had finished the work.
2. to stay close to the side of a road etc.
keep in mind
to remember and take into consideration later.
keep it up
to carry on doing something at the same speed or as well as one is doing it at present. Your work is good – keep it up!
keep off
1. to stay away. There are notices round the bomb warning people to keep off; The rain kept off and we had sunshine for the wedding.
2. to prevent from getting to or on to (something). This umbrella isn't pretty, but it keeps off the rain.
keep on
to continue (doing something or moving). He just kept on writing; They kept on until they came to a petrol station.
keep oneself to oneself
to tell others very little about oneself, and not to be very friendly or sociable.
keep out
not to (allow to) enter. The notice at the building site said `Keep out!'; This coat keeps out the wind.
keep out of
not to become involved in. Do try to keep out of trouble!
keep time
(of a clock etc) to show the time accurately. Does this watch keep (good) time?
keep to
not to leave or go away from. Keep to this side of the park!; We kept to the roads we knew.
keep (something) to oneself
not to tell anyone (something). He kept his conclusions to himself.
keep up
1. to continue, or cause to remain, in operation. I enjoy our friendship and try to keep it up.
2. (often with with) to move fast enough not to be left behind (by). Even the children managed to keep up; Don't run – I can't keep up with you.
keep up with the Joneses (ˈdʒounziz)
to have everything one's neighbours have. She didn't need a new cooker – she just bought one to keep up with the Joneses.
keep watch
to have the task of staying alert and watching for danger.
References in classic literature ?
I'll teach you to put your hands on my boy, you beast," roared the sa- loon keeper, who, tired of beating the master, had begun to kick him about the yard.
Nor did his demeanour change when the withdrawal of the prison keeper left him face to face with the woman, whose absorbed notice of him, in the crowd, had intimated so close a relation between himself and her.
The keeper of the toll-gate said he rode at a hard gallop through the gate; and my shoe was picked up among the stones, so that the case was quite plain to them, and I was cleared of all blame.
Very frequently a lodging house keeper would rent the same beds to double shifts of men.
Skeggs, the keeper of a depot on street, to await the auction, next day.
If I could see the head keeper a minute -- only just a minute --"
Upon the whole, we got along very well, so far as the jail and its keeper were concerned.
said the wine-shop keeper, crossing the road, and obliterating the jest with a handful of mud, picked up for the purpose, and smeared over it.
Their keeper had a brace of pistols, and carried a thick-knobbed bludgeon under his arm; but he was on terms of good understanding with them, and stood, with them beside him, looking on at the putting-to of the horses, rather with an air as if the convicts were an interesting Exhibition not formally open at the moment, and he the Curator.
The foul fiend take Malvoisin,'' answered the Saxon, ``and his keeper both
So large," replied the man who sat at the door of the cart, "that larger, or as large, have never crossed from Africa to Spain; I am the keeper, and I have brought over others, but never any like these.
A hundred moonlit miles away the Chiang crept to sea; O keeper of my heart, I came by Chiang's ford to thee.