keeping


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Related to keeping: Keeping room, Keeping Up Appearances

keep·ing

 (kē′pĭng)
n.
1. The act of holding, guarding, maintaining, or supporting: the keeping of secrets; the keeping of records.
2. Custody; care: The heirloom is in my keeping. See Synonyms at care.
3. Harmony; conformity: "A facade had been added, in perfect keeping with [the] original architecture" (Nancy Holmes).

keeping

(ˈkiːpɪŋ)
n
1. conformity or harmony (esp in the phrases in or out of keeping)
2. charge or care: valuables in the keeping of a bank.

keep•ing

(ˈki pɪŋ)

n.
1. agreement or conformity in things or elements associated together: actions in keeping with one's words.
2. the act of a person or thing that keeps; observance, custody, or care.
3. maintenance or keep.
[1250–1300]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.keeping - conformity or harmony; "his behavior was not in keeping with the occasion"
abidance, compliance, conformity, conformation - acting according to certain accepted standards; "their financial statements are in conformity with generally accepted accounting practices"
2.keeping - the responsibility of a guardian or keeper; "he left his car in my keeping"
hands, custody - (with `in') guardianship over; in divorce cases it is the right to house and care for and discipline a child; "my fate is in your hands"; "too much power in the president's hands"; "your guests are now in my custody"; "the mother was awarded custody of the children"
duty, obligation, responsibility - the social force that binds you to the courses of action demanded by that force; "we must instill a sense of duty in our children"; "every right implies a responsibility; every opportunity, an obligation; every possession, a duty"- John D.Rockefeller Jr
3.keeping - the act of retaining somethingkeeping - the act of retaining something  
possession, ownership - the act of having and controlling property
withholding - the act of holding back or keeping within your possession or control; "I resented his withholding permission"; "there were allegations of the withholding of evidence"
storage - the act of storing something

keeping

noun care, keep, charge, trust, protection, possession, maintenance, custody, patronage, guardianship, safekeeping It has been handed over for safe keeping.
in keeping with in agreement with, consistent with, in harmony with, in accord with, in compliance with, in conformity with, in balance with, in correspondence with, in proportion with, in congruity with, in observance with His office was in keeping with his station and experience.

keeping

noun
1. The function of watching, guarding, or overseeing:
Translations
عنايَه، مَسؤوليَّه
varetægt
tartás
varîveisla
úschova

keeping

[ˈkiːpɪŋ] N
1. (= harmony) to be in keeping withestar de acuerdo con, estar en armonía con
to be out of keeping withestar en desacuerdo con
her clothes were totally out of keeping with the elegant settingla ropa que llevaba desentonaba totalmente con el elegante entorno
2. (= care, custody) to be in the keeping of Xestar en manos de X
to be in safe keepingestar en un lugar seguro, estar en buenas manos
to give sth to sb for safe keepingponer algo al cuidado de algn

keeping

[ˈkiːpɪŋ] n
in keeping with sth → en accord avec qch
to be in keeping with sth (= appropriate to) → s'accorder avec qch
to be out of keeping with sth → ne pas s'accorder avec qch
Her costume was quite out of keeping with the character she was playing → Son costume ne s'accordait guère avec le personnage qu'elle jouait.

keeping

n
(= care) to put something in somebody’s keepingjdm etw zur Aufbewahrung übergeben ? safe keeping
(of rule)Beachten nt, → Einhalten nt
in keeping within Übereinstimmung or Einklang mit; her behaviour was out of keeping with the dignity of the occasionihr Benehmen entsprach nicht der Feierlichkeit des Anlasses

keeping

[ˈkiːpɪŋ] n
a. in keeping/out of keeping (with)in armonia/disaccordo (con)
that modern building is out of keeping with the houses round about → quella costruzione moderna stona con le case intorno
b. (care) → custodia
in the keeping of → in custodia a
in safe keeping → al sicuro

keep

(kiːp) past tense, past participle kept (kept) verb
1. to have for a very long or indefinite period of time. He gave me the picture to keep.
2. not to give or throw away; to preserve. I kept the most interesting books; Can you keep a secret?
3. to (cause to) remain in a certain state or position. I keep this gun loaded; How do you keep cool in this heat?; Will you keep me informed of what happens?
4. to go on (performing or repeating a certain action). He kept walking.
5. to have in store. I always keep a tin of baked beans for emergencies.
6. to look after or care for. She keeps the garden beautifully; I think they keep hens.
7. to remain in good condition. That meat won't keep in this heat unless you put it in the fridge.
8. to make entries in (a diary, accounts etc). She keeps a diary to remind her of her appointments; He kept the accounts for the club.
9. to hold back or delay. Sorry to keep you.
10. to provide food, clothes, housing for (someone). He has a wife and child to keep.
11. to act in the way demanded by. She kept her promise.
12. to celebrate. to keep Christmas.
noun
food and lodging. She gives her mother money every week for her keep; Our cat really earns her keep – she kills all the mice in the house.
ˈkeeper noun
1. a person who looks after something, eg animals in a zoo. The lion has killed its keeper.
2. a goalkeeper.
ˈkeeping noun
care or charge. The money had been given into his keeping.
ˌkeep-ˈfit noun
a series or system of exercises, usually simple, intended to improve the physical condition of ordinary people, especially women. She's very keen on keep-fit but it doesn't do her much good; (also adjective) keep-fit exercises.
ˈkeepsake (-seik) noun
something given or taken to be kept in memory of the giver. She gave him a piece of her hair as a keepsake.
for keeps
permanently. You can have this necklace for keeps.
in keeping with
suited to. He has moved to a house more in keeping with his position as a headmaster.
keep away
to (cause to) remain at a distance. Keep away – it's dangerous!
keep back
1. not to (allow to) move forward. She kept the child back on the edge of the crowd; Every body keep back from the door!
2. not to tell or make known. I feel he's keeping the real story back for some reason.
3. not to give or pay out. Part of my allowance is kept back to pay for my meals; Will they keep it back every week?
keep one's distance
to stay quite far away. The deer did not trust us and kept their distance.
keep down
1. not to (allow to) rise up. Keep down – they're shooting at us!
2. to control or put a limit on. They are taking steps to keep down the rabbit population.
3. to digest without vomiting. He has eaten some food but he won't be able to keep it down.
keep one's end up
to perform one's part in something just as well as all the others who are involved.
keep from
to stop oneself from (doing something). I could hardly keep from hitting him.
keep going
to go on doing something despite difficulties.
keep hold of
not to let go of. Keep hold of those tickets!
keep house (for)
to do the cooking, housework etc (for). She keeps house for her brother.
keep in
1. not to allow to go or come out or outside. The teacher kept him in till he had finished the work.
2. to stay close to the side of a road etc.
keep in mind
to remember and take into consideration later.
keep it up
to carry on doing something at the same speed or as well as one is doing it at present. Your work is good – keep it up!
keep off
1. to stay away. There are notices round the bomb warning people to keep off; The rain kept off and we had sunshine for the wedding.
2. to prevent from getting to or on to (something). This umbrella isn't pretty, but it keeps off the rain.
keep on
to continue (doing something or moving). He just kept on writing; They kept on until they came to a petrol station.
keep oneself to oneself
to tell others very little about oneself, and not to be very friendly or sociable.
keep out
not to (allow to) enter. The notice at the building site said `Keep out!'; This coat keeps out the wind.
keep out of
not to become involved in. Do try to keep out of trouble!
keep time
(of a clock etc) to show the time accurately. Does this watch keep (good) time?
keep to
not to leave or go away from. Keep to this side of the park!; We kept to the roads we knew.
keep (something) to oneself
not to tell anyone (something). He kept his conclusions to himself.
keep up
1. to continue, or cause to remain, in operation. I enjoy our friendship and try to keep it up.
2. (often with with) to move fast enough not to be left behind (by). Even the children managed to keep up; Don't run – I can't keep up with you.
keep up with the Joneses (ˈdʒounziz)
to have everything one's neighbours have. She didn't need a new cooker – she just bought one to keep up with the Joneses.
keep watch
to have the task of staying alert and watching for danger.

keeping

n. cuidado, custodia.
References in classic literature ?
It's naughty to fret, but I do think washing dishes and keeping things tidy is the worst work in the world.
Here and there he went throwing the money about, driving carriages through the streets, giving wine parties to crowds of men and women, playing cards for high stakes and keeping mistresses whose wardrobes cost him hundreds of dollars.
What's this about the idol keeping guard over the ancient city?
Everything about this old man was in keeping with his dignified manner.
She played very well, keeping excellent waltz time and infusing an expression into the strains which was indeed inspiring.
At that rate, keeping Spear out of prison would cost a thousand dollars.
Nor was it out of keeping with the general coarseness and matter-of-fact character of the age, that the son should be willing to earn an honest penny, or, rather, a weighty amount of sterling pounds, from the purse of his father's deadly enemy.
His tendency to veer about from one subject to another; his habit of keeping his tongue perpetually going, so long as there was anybody, no matter whom, within reach of the sound of his voice; his comical want of all dignity and reserve with his servants, promised, in appearance, much, and performed in reality nothing.
The design of the objection, which has been mentioned, is to preclude standing armies in time of peace, though we have never been informed how far it is designed the prohibition should extend; whether to raising armies as well as to KEEPING THEM UP in a season of tranquillity or not.
I half turned, keeping my eyes fixed upon the cylinder still, from which other tentacles were now projecting, and began pushing my way back from the edge of the pit.
To heighten the excitement and confuse the guessers, a number of dry poles are laid before each platoon, upon which the members of the party "in hand" beat furiously with short staves, keeping time to the choral chant already mentioned, which waxes fast and furious as the game proceeds.
This was done after the Indian fashion, by drawing up the edges of the skin with thongs, and keeping them distended by sticks or thwart pieces.