Kelvin

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Kelvin

, First Baron Title of William Thomson. 1824-1907.
British physicist who developed the Kelvin scale of temperature (1848) and supervised the laying of a trans-Atlantic cable (1866).

kel·vin

 (kĕl′vĭn)
n. pl. kelvin Abbr. K
1. A unit of absolute temperature equal to 1/273.16 of the absolute temperature of the triple point of water. One kelvin degree is equal to one Celsius degree. See Table at measurement.
2. Kelvin A temperature scale in which zero occurs at absolute zero and each degree equals one kelvin. Water freezes at 273.15 K and boils at 373.15 K.

[After First Baron Kelvin.]

Kelvin

(ˈkɛlvɪn)
n
(Biography) William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin. 1824–1907, British physicist, noted for his work in thermodynamics, inventing the Kelvin scale, and in electricity, pioneering undersea telegraphy

kelvin

(ˈkɛlvɪn)
n
(Units) the basic SI unit of thermodynamic temperature; the fraction of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water. Symbol: K

Kel•vin

(ˈkɛl vɪn)

n.
1. William Thomson, 1st Baron, 1824–1907, English physicist and mathematician.
2. (l.c.) the base SI unit of temperature, defined to be 1/273.16 of the triple point of water. Symbol: K
adj.
3. of or pertaining to an absolute scale of temperature (Kel′vin scale`) based on the kelvin in which the degree intervals are equal to those of the Celsius scale.

kel·vin

(kĕl′vĭn)
A unit of absolute temperature having the same value as one Celsius degree. It is used in the Kelvin scale. See more at Celsius. See Table at measurement.

Kelvin

, First Baron. Title of William Thomson 1824-1907.
British mathematician and physicist known especially for his work on heat and electricity. In 1848 he proposed a scale of temperature independent of any physical substance, which became known as the Kelvin scale.

kelvin

(K) A scale of temperature measurement in which each degree is equal to 1⁄273.16 of the interval between 0 K (absolute zero) and the triple point of water. K = °C + 273.16. Named after William Thomson, Lord Kelvin (1824–1907).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kelvin - the basic unit of thermodynamic temperature adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites
temperature unit - a unit of measurement for temperature
2.kelvin - British physicist who invented the Kelvin scale of temperature and pioneered undersea telegraphy (1824-1907)Kelvin - British physicist who invented the Kelvin scale of temperature and pioneered undersea telegraphy (1824-1907)
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
However, his calculations suggest that a neutron star's surface can't reach temperatures as high as 1 billion kelvins.
Homing in on the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Andromeda galaxy, the sharp eye of the Chandra X-ray Observatory has found that gas falling into the dense object has a temperature of a few million kelvins.
4]--increased its maximum superconducting temperature from 25 to 49 kelvins, researchers report in the July 30 Nature.
In one elderly pair, WZ Sagittae, a small but extremely dense star known as a white dwarf has stripped so much material from its average-density companion that this partner has only about 5 percent of the mass of the sun and a temperature of just 1,700 kelvins.
The Sandia team has proposed building a new machine, called X-1, which would aim for a power of 1,000 terawatts, an energy of 16 megajoules, and temperatures in the range of 2 million to 3 million kelvins, says Jeffrey P.
Although many of the new ceramic superconductors work at 100 kelvins or more, sulfur sets a record high temperature for a pure element conducting electricity without resistance.
The absence of neon suggests that the grains of interstellar ice that built Hale-Bopp and Hyakutake must have done so in a part of the solar system where temperatures are above 25 kelvins.
Though it lies several hundred thousand kilometers above the sun's surface, the corona has a temperature of at least 1 million kelvins, about 200 times greater than that of the surface itself.
The spot has a diameter about 10 times that of Earth and a temperature of roughly 7,000 kelvins, 2,000 kelvins higher than its surroundings.
Astronomers had also thought that the periodic explosions would raise a dwarf's temperature to several hundred thousand or perhaps a million kelvins.