kerosene


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ker·o·sene

also ker·o·sine  (kĕr′ə-sēn′, kăr′-, kĕr′ə-sēn′, kăr′-)
n.
A thin oil distilled from petroleum or shale oil, used as a fuel for heating and cooking, in lamps, and as a denaturant for alcohol. Also called coal oil.

[Greek kēros, wax + -ene.]

kerosene

(ˈkɛrəˌsiːn) or

kerosine

n
1. (Elements & Compounds) Also called: paraffin a liquid mixture consisting mainly of alkane hydrocarbons with boiling points in the range 150°–300°C, used as an aircraft fuel, in domestic heaters, and as a solvent
2. (Aeronautics) the general name for paraffin as a fuel for jet aircraft
[C19: from Greek kēros wax + -ene]
Usage: The spelling kerosine is now the preferred form in technical and industrial usage

ker•o•sene

or ker•o•sine

(ˈkɛr əˌsin, ˈkær-, ˌkɛr əˈsin, ˌkær-)

n.
a mixture of liquid hydrocarbons obtained by distilling petroleum, bituminous shale, or the like and widely used as a fuel and cleaning solvent.
[1852; irreg. < Greek kērós wax + -ene; formerly a trademark]

ker·o·sene

(kĕr′ə-sēn′)
A thin, light-colored oil that is obtained from petroleum and used mainly as a fuel in lamps, home heaters and furnaces, and jet engines.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kerosene - a flammable hydrocarbon oil used as fuel in lamps and heaterskerosene - a flammable hydrocarbon oil used as fuel in lamps and heaters
fuel - a substance that can be consumed to produce energy; "more fuel is needed during the winter months"; "they developed alternative fuels for aircraft"
hydrocarbon - an organic compound containing only carbon and hydrogen
paraffin oil, paraffin - (British usage) kerosine
Translations
بَارَافِيـنكِيروسِيـنكيروسين: زيت إنارَه
petrolejparafín
petroleum
lambiõlipetrooleum
kerosiiniparafiiniPetroleumpetroli
मिट्टी का तेल
kerozinparafin
kerozin
steinolía
パラフィン灯油
등유
žibalasžibalinis
petrolejapetrolejas-
kerozin
fotogen
น้ำมันก๊าดพาราฟิน
dầu hỏadầu lửa

kerosene

[ˈkerəsiːn]
A. Nkeroseno m, queroseno m, querosén m (LAm)
B. CPD kerosene lamp Nlámpara f de petróleo

kerosene

[ˈkɛrəsiːn] nkérosène m

kerosene

nKerosin nt

kerosene

kerosine [ˈkɛrəsiːn] n (esp Am) → cherosene m

kerosene

(ˈkerəsiːn) noun
paraffin oil, obtained from petroleum or from coal. The jet plane refuelled with kerosene; (also adjective) a kerosene lamp/stove.

kerosene

بَارَافِيـن, كِيروسِيـن parafín, petrolej petroleum Kerosin, Paraffin κηροζίνη, παραφίνη parafina, queroseno kerosiini, parafiini kérosène, paraffine kerozin, parafin cherosene, paraffina パラフィン, 灯油 등유 paraffine, petroleum parafin nafta, parafina parafina, querosene керосин fotogen น้ำมันก๊าด, พาราฟิน gazyağı, parafin dầu hỏa, dầu lửa 煤油, 石蜡
References in classic literature ?
I wish you would go and fetch my satchel, two lanterns, and a can of kerosene oil that is under the seat.
Just then his eye fell upon the lanterns and the can of kerosene oil which Zeb had brought from the car of his balloon, and he got a clever idea from those commonplace things.
The kerosene lamps above flung high lights from the rash of sweat on his forehead.
Daylight leaned back in his chair and gazed up at the kerosene lamps while he computed aloud.
Tar; Spanish onions; kerosene oil; wet raincoats; crushed laurel-leaves; rubber burning; lace-curtains being washed--No, my mistake, lace-curtains hanging out to dry; and foxes-- hundreds of 'em--cubs; and--"
One evening in July, when the transient guests who made the New Willard House their temporary home had become scarce, and the hallways, lighted only by kerosene lamps turned low, were plunged in gloom, Elizabeth Willard had an adventure.
He's been piling up branches for a fortnight and pestering Marilla to be let pour some kerosene oil over it before setting it on fire.
He cooked for himself," she interrupted, "on a little kerosene stove.
From a cache behind a hollow rotting log my companion brought out a variety of things,--a fifty-pound sack of flour, tinned foods of all sorts, cooking utensils, blankets, a canvas tarpaulin, books and writing material, a great bundle of letters, a five-gallon can of kerosene, an oil stove, and, last and most important, a large coil of stout rope.
At nightfall he ran into Teddy's nursery to watch how kerosene lamps were lighted, and when Teddy went to bed Rikki-tikki climbed up too.
It stands to reason the sea's the sea; and you'll git jest about what's goin', candles or kerosene, fer that matter.
His face, by the full ray of the kerosene lamp, changed and darkened, and Kim, used as every beggar must be to watching countenances, took good note.