kick in


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Related to kick in: kick upstairs, kick off, kick out, kicking back

kick

 (kĭk)
v. kicked, kick·ing, kicks
v.intr.
1. To extend the leg away from the body; strike out with the foot or feet.
2. Sports
a. To score or gain ground by kicking a ball.
b. To punt in football.
c. To propel the body in swimming by moving the legs, as with a flutter kick or frog kick.
3. To recoil: The powerful rifle kicked upon being fired.
4. Informal
a. To express negative feelings vigorously; complain.
b. To oppose by argument; protest.
v.tr.
1. To strike with the foot: kicked the wall in frustration.
2. To propel by striking with the foot: kick a ball.
3. To spring back against suddenly: The rifle kicked my shoulder when I fired it.
4. Sports To score (a goal or point) by kicking a ball.
n.
1.
a. A vigorous blow with the foot.
b. Sports The motion of the legs that propels the body in swimming.
2. Any of various moves in dance in which the leg is extended from the body.
3. A jolting recoil: a rifle with a heavy kick.
4. Slang A complaint; a protest.
5. Slang Power; force: a car engine with a lot of kick.
6. Slang
a. A feeling of pleasurable stimulation: got a kick out of the show.
b. kicks Fun: went bowling just for kicks.
7. Slang Temporary, often obsessive interest: I'm on a science fiction kick.
8. Slang A sudden, striking surprise; a twist.
9. kicks Slang Shoes.
10. Sports
a. The act or an instance of kicking a ball.
b. A kicked ball.
c. The distance spanned by a kicked ball.
Phrasal Verbs:
kick about Informal
To move from place to place.
kick around Informal
1. To treat badly; abuse.
2. To move from place to place: "spent the next three years in Italy, kicking around the country on a motor scooter" (Charles E. Claffey).
3. To give thought or consideration to; ponder or discuss.
kick back
1. To recoil unexpectedly and violently.
2. Informal To take it easy; relax: kicked back at home and watched TV.
3. Slang To return (stolen items).
4. Slang To pay a kickback.
kick in
1. Informal To contribute (one's share): kicked in a few dollars for the office party.
2. Informal To become operative or take effect: "His pituitary kicked in, and his growth was suddenly vertical" (Kenneth Browser).
3. Slang To die.
kick off
1. Sports To begin or resume play with a kickoff.
2. Informal To begin; start: kicked off the promotional tour with a press conference.
3. Slang To die.
kick out Slang
To throw out; dismiss.
kick over
To begin to fire: The engine finally kicked over.
kick up Informal
1. To increase in amount or force; intensify: A sandstorm kicked up while we drove through the desert.
2. To stir up (trouble): kicked up a row.
3. To show signs of disorder: His ulcer has kicked up again.
Idioms:
kick ass/butt Vulgar Slang
To take forceful or harsh measures to achieve an objective.
kick the bucket Slang
To die.
kick the habit Slang
To free oneself of an addiction, as to narcotics or cigarettes.
kick up (one's) heels Informal
To cast off one's inhibitions and have a good time.
kick upstairs Slang
To promote to a higher yet less desirable position.

[Middle English kiken, perhaps of Scandinavian origin.]

kick in

vb (adverb)
1. (intr) to start or become activated
2. (tr) chiefly informal Austral and NZ to contribute
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.kick in - enter a particular state; "Laziness set in"; "After a few moments, the effects of the drug kicked in"
begin, start - have a beginning, in a temporal, spatial, or evaluative sense; "The DMZ begins right over the hill"; "The second movement begins after the Allegro"; "Prices for these homes start at $250,000"
2.kick in - contribute to some cause; "I gave at the office"
give - transfer possession of something concrete or abstract to somebody; "I gave her my money"; "can you give me lessons?"; "She gave the children lots of love and tender loving care"
combine - add together from different sources; "combine resources"
3.kick in - open violently; "kick in the doors"
ruin, destroy - destroy completely; damage irreparably; "You have ruined my car by pouring sugar in the tank!"; "The tears ruined her make-up"

kick

verb
1. Informal. To express negative feelings, especially of dissatisfaction or resentment:
Informal: crab, gripe, grouse.
Slang: beef, bellyache, bitch.
2. Informal. To express opposition, often by argument:
Informal: squawk.
Idioms: set up a squawk, take exception.
3. Slang. To desist from, cease, or discontinue (a habit, for example):
phrasal verb
kick around
Informal. To speak together and exchange ideas and opinions about:
bandy (about), discuss, moot, talk over, thrash out (or over), thresh out (or over), toss around.
Informal: hash (over), knock about (or around).
Slang: rap.
phrasal verb
kick in
1. Informal. To give in common with others:
Slang: come across.
2. Slang. To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
phrasal verb
kick off
2. Slang. To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
phrasal verb
kick out
Slang. To put out by force:
Informal: chuck.
Slang: boot (out), bounce.
Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear.
noun
1. Slang. An expression of dissatisfaction or a circumstance regarded as a cause for such expression:
Informal: gripe, grouse.
Slang: beef.
Idiom: bone to pick.
2. Slang. The act of expressing strong or reasoned opposition:
3. Slang. A stimulating or intoxicating effect:
Informal: punch, sting, wallop.
4. Slang. A strong, pleasant feeling of excitement or stimulation:
Informal: wallop.
Slang: bang, boot, high.
5. Slang. A temporary concentration of interest:
Slang: trip.
6. Slang. A clever, unexpected new trick or method:
Informal: kicker, wrinkle.
Slang: angle.
Translations
potkaistasisään

w>kick in

vt sep dooreintreten; to kick somebody’s teeth injdm die Zähne einschlagen
vi (= take effect) (system, fear)ausgelöst werden; (drug etc)wirken
References in classic literature ?
Look at Mary an' me, Come on an' kick in, you cold-feets.
Buy a pup and your money will buy Love unflinching that cannot lie-- Perfect passion and worship fed By a kick in the ribs or a pat on the head.
He slashed ankle and foot as he received the second kick in mid-air; and, although he slid clear down the slope of deck into the scuppers, he left on the black skin the red tracery of his puppy-needle teeth.