kick off


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kick

 (kĭk)
v. kicked, kick·ing, kicks
v.intr.
1. To extend the leg away from the body; strike out with the foot or feet.
2. Sports
a. To score or gain ground by kicking a ball.
b. To punt in football.
c. To propel the body in swimming by moving the legs, as with a flutter kick or frog kick.
3. To recoil: The powerful rifle kicked upon being fired.
4. Informal
a. To express negative feelings vigorously; complain.
b. To oppose by argument; protest.
v.tr.
1. To strike with the foot: kicked the wall in frustration.
2. To propel by striking with the foot: kick a ball.
3. To spring back against suddenly: The rifle kicked my shoulder when I fired it.
4. Sports To score (a goal or point) by kicking a ball.
n.
1.
a. A vigorous blow with the foot.
b. Sports The motion of the legs that propels the body in swimming.
2. Any of various moves in dance in which the leg is extended from the body.
3. A jolting recoil: a rifle with a heavy kick.
4. Slang A complaint; a protest.
5. Slang Power; force: a car engine with a lot of kick.
6. Slang
a. A feeling of pleasurable stimulation: got a kick out of the show.
b. kicks Fun: went bowling just for kicks.
7. Slang Temporary, often obsessive interest: I'm on a science fiction kick.
8. Slang A sudden, striking surprise; a twist.
9. kicks Slang Shoes.
10. Sports
a. The act or an instance of kicking a ball.
b. A kicked ball.
c. The distance spanned by a kicked ball.
Phrasal Verbs:
kick about Informal
To move from place to place.
kick around Informal
1. To treat badly; abuse.
2. To move from place to place: "spent the next three years in Italy, kicking around the country on a motor scooter" (Charles E. Claffey).
3. To give thought or consideration to; ponder or discuss.
kick back
1. To recoil unexpectedly and violently.
2. Informal To take it easy; relax: kicked back at home and watched TV.
3. Slang To return (stolen items).
4. Slang To pay a kickback.
kick in
1. Informal To contribute (one's share): kicked in a few dollars for the office party.
2. Informal To become operative or take effect: "His pituitary kicked in, and his growth was suddenly vertical" (Kenneth Browser).
3. Slang To die.
kick off
1. Sports To begin or resume play with a kickoff.
2. Informal To begin; start: kicked off the promotional tour with a press conference.
3. Slang To die.
kick out Slang
To throw out; dismiss.
kick over
To begin to fire: The engine finally kicked over.
kick up Informal
1. To increase in amount or force; intensify: A sandstorm kicked up while we drove through the desert.
2. To stir up (trouble): kicked up a row.
3. To show signs of disorder: His ulcer has kicked up again.
Idioms:
kick ass/butt Vulgar Slang
To take forceful or harsh measures to achieve an objective.
kick the bucket Slang
To die.
kick the habit Slang
To free oneself of an addiction, as to narcotics or cigarettes.
kick up (one's) heels Informal
To cast off one's inhibitions and have a good time.
kick upstairs Slang
To promote to a higher yet less desirable position.

[Middle English kiken, perhaps of Scandinavian origin.]

kick off

vb (intr, adverb)
1. (Soccer) to start play in a game of football by kicking the ball from the centre of the field
2. (Rugby) to start play in a game of football by kicking the ball from the centre of the field
3. informal to commence a discussion, job, etc
n
4. (Soccer)
a. a place kick from the centre of the field in a game of football
b. the time at which the first such kick is due to take place: kickoff is at 2.30 p.m.
5. (Rugby)
a. a place kick from the centre of the field in a game of football
b. the time at which the first such kick is due to take place: kickoff is at 2.30 p.m.
6. informal
a. the beginning of something
b. for a kickoff to begin with
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.kick off - commence officially
swear in - administer on oath to; "The speaker of the House swore in the new President"
embark on, start up, commence, start - get off the ground; "Who started this company?"; "We embarked on an exciting enterprise"; "I start my day with a good breakfast"; "We began the new semester"; "The afternoon session begins at 4 PM"; "The blood shed started when the partisans launched a surprise attack"
dedicate - open to public use, as of a highway, park, or building; "The Beauty Queen spends her time dedicating parks and nursing homes"

kick

verb
1. Informal. To express negative feelings, especially of dissatisfaction or resentment:
Informal: crab, gripe, grouse.
Slang: beef, bellyache, bitch.
2. Informal. To express opposition, often by argument:
Informal: squawk.
Idioms: set up a squawk, take exception.
3. Slang. To desist from, cease, or discontinue (a habit, for example):
phrasal verb
kick around
Informal. To speak together and exchange ideas and opinions about:
bandy (about), discuss, moot, talk over, thrash out (or over), thresh out (or over), toss around.
Informal: hash (over), knock about (or around).
Slang: rap.
phrasal verb
kick in
1. Informal. To give in common with others:
Slang: come across.
2. Slang. To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
phrasal verb
kick off
2. Slang. To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
phrasal verb
kick out
Slang. To put out by force:
Informal: chuck.
Slang: boot (out), bounce.
Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear.
noun
1. Slang. An expression of dissatisfaction or a circumstance regarded as a cause for such expression:
Informal: gripe, grouse.
Slang: beef.
Idiom: bone to pick.
2. Slang. The act of expressing strong or reasoned opposition:
3. Slang. A stimulating or intoxicating effect:
Informal: punch, sting, wallop.
4. Slang. A strong, pleasant feeling of excitement or stimulation:
Informal: wallop.
Slang: bang, boot, high.
5. Slang. A temporary concentration of interest:
Slang: trip.
6. Slang. A clever, unexpected new trick or method:
Informal: kicker, wrinkle.
Slang: angle.
Translations
zahájit
startstarte
aloittaa
početi
kezdõ rúgást tesz
hefja leik
キックオフする
시작하다
urobiť výkop
sparka igång
เริ่ม
mở màn

w>kick off

vi (Ftbl) → anstoßen; (player also) → den Anstoß ausführen; (fig inf)losgehen (inf), → beginnen; who’s going to kick off? (fig inf)wer fängt an?
vt sepwegtreten; shoesvon sich schleudern; they kicked him off the committee (inf)sie warfen ihn aus dem Ausschuss

kick

(kik) verb
1. to hit or strike out with the foot. The child kicked his brother; He kicked the ball into the next garden; He kicked at the locked door; He kicked open the gate.
2. (of a gun) to jerk or spring back violently when fired.
noun
1. a blow with the foot. The boy gave him a kick on the ankle; He was injured by a kick from a horse.
2. the springing back of a gun after it has been fired.
3. a pleasant thrill. She gets a kick out of making people happy.
kick about/around
to treat badly or bully. The bigger boys are always kicking him around.
kick off to start a football game by kicking the ball: We kick off at 2.30 . ( noun ˈkick-off: The kick-off is at 2.30)
kick up
to cause or start off (a fuss etc).

kick off

يَنْطَلِقُ zahájit starte anstoßen δίνω το εναρκτήριο λάκτισμα empezar aloittaa démarrer početi battere il calcio d’inizio キックオフする 시작하다 aftrappen sette i gang dać pierwszy strzał w meczu piłki nożnej iniciar начинать sparka igång เริ่ม başlama vuruşu yapmak mở màn 开始
References in classic literature ?
And on each side of old Brooke, who is now standing in the middle of the ground and just going to kick off, you see a separate wing of players-up, each with a boy of acknowledged prowess to look to--here Warner, and there Hedge; but over all is old Brooke, absolute as he of Russia, but wisely and bravely ruling over willing and worshipping subjects, a true football king.
But now Griffith's baskets are empty, the ball is placed again midway, and the School are going to kick off.
She sank again, in the moment when I stopped to throw aside my hat and coat and to kick off my shoes.
So now, when I heard him kick off his own shoes, I did the same, and was on the stairs at his heels before I realized what an extraordinary way was this of approaching a stranger for money in the dead of night.
The home game with Crystal Palace will now be played on Sunday September 21, kick off 4pm, while the trip to Sunderland will take place on Sunday November 9, kick off 1.
SERIE A: live coverage of a top Italian match, kick off 7.
If the FA want to start making improvements to the game, they can get their own house in order first, and go back to 3pm kick offs.
Train bosses have written to the Welsh Rugby Union and the International Rugby Board begging them to kick off earlier.