kin selection


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

kin selection

n.
A biological theory stating that a gene that causes an organism to exhibit behavior detrimental to its survival will increase in frequency in a population if that behavior benefits the organism's relatives, which will pass the gene on to subsequent generations.

kin selection

n
(Biology) biology natural selection resulting from altruistic behaviour by animals towards members of the same species, esp their offspring or other relatives
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The theory of kin selection has for some time allowed biologists to explain why some animals and other organisms adopt altruistic behaviour, at their own expense, for the benefit of their relatives.
The theory of kin selection explains why some animals adopt behaviour, at their own expense, like worker bees laying down their lives for the queen.
They insisted that everything group selection tried to explain could be better explained by principles like kin selection and reciprocal altruism.
A short introductory chapter builds a basic model of morality as the emotional extension of kin selection and a history of increasing interdependence.
Evidently associating "inclusive fitness" (the general idea) with kin selection (the more particular application of the general idea), Wilson sometimes says that kin selection exists (76, 109), sometimes that it does not (53, 106), and sometimes that it might or might not exist but that if it does exist it does not count for much (174, 181).
The basic assumptions that inform DLS are: (1) kindness has evolutionary roots; (2) kin selection, based on shared ancestry/genes, does not account for the range of kindness displayed by humans, and does not address why altruism often extends to non-kin; (3) cross-generational social learnings/teachings may account for kindness-based behaviours evidenced in Newfoundland/Alberta migration processes and in global contexts.
Environments during childhood can have a whopping effect on each of these three traits as well, but none of this changes the mathematics or the long-term predictive value of kin selection theory.
Research also indicates that fa'afafine exhibit elevated avuncular tendencies and behaviour compared to women and gynephilic men, which is consistent with the Kin Selection Hypothesis.
The study not only demonstrates that the influence of kin selection may stretch beyond that of nuclear and extended family groups thus promoting co-operation in large social groups, but it is also the first study to show that kin selection may promote the communal construction and maintenance of an animal-built physical structure.
This article is divided in four parts being part one this introduction, on the second part we show how a behavior can be the result of an adaptive trait, in the third part we show how kin selection, reciprocal altruism and indication of suitability are adaptive traits that can lead to altruistic behavior, and finally in the fourth part we make the final analysis on those themes and conclude the article.
SATISFIED DARWINIANS LIKE WILSON see at least four mechanisms for the evolution of social cooperation and human morality: kin selection (cooperating with relatives), direct reciprocity (tit-for-tat exchanges), indirect reciprocity (having a good or bad reputation), and multilevel selection (individual selection and group selection).
Gad Saad, a professor of marketing at Concordia University and the founder of the field of evolutionary consumption, argues most acts of consumption can be mapped into four main Darwinian drives--namely, survival (we prefer food high in calories); reproduction (we use products as sexual signals); kin selection (we naturally exchange gifts with family members); and reciprocal altruism (we enjoy giving gifts to close friends).