kindled


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Related to kindled: inevitability, reported

kin·dle 1

 (kĭn′dl)
v. kin·dled, kin·dling, kin·dles
v.tr.
1.
a. To build or fuel (a fire).
b. To set fire to; ignite.
2. To cause to glow; light up: The sunset kindled the skies.
3. To arouse (an emotion, for example): "No spark had yet kindled in him an intellectual passion" (George Eliot).
v.intr.
1. To catch fire; burst into flame.
2. To become bright; glow.
3. To become inflamed.
4. To be stirred up; rise.

[Middle English kindelen (influenced by kindelen, to give birth to, cause), probably from Old Norse kynda.]

kin′dler n.

kin·dle 2

 (kĭn′dl)
intr.v. kin·dled, kin·dling, kin·dles
To give birth to young. Used especially of rabbits.
n.
A brood or litter, especially of kittens.

[Middle English kindelen, from kindel, offspring, from Old English gecynd; see kind2.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.kindled - set afire; "the ignited paper"; "a kindled fire"
lighted, lit - set afire or burning; "the lighted candles"; "a lighted cigarette"; "a lit firecracker"
References in classic literature ?
Here encamping for the night, in the midst of abundance of sage, or wormwood, which afforded fodder for their horses, they kindled a huge fire for the benefit of their damp comrade, and then proceeded to prepare a sumptuous supper of buffalo humps and ribs, and other choice bits, which they had brought with them.
When he first heard Blifil tell his uncle this story, Jones could hardly contain the wrath which kindled in him at the other's indiscretion, especially as the doctor shook his head, and declared his unwillingness to have the matter mentioned to his patient.
So the man listened to her words, and the woman dwelt there, and brought the wood and kindled the fire, till one day her husband said to her, 'It is now two years since you died.