kindled


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to kindled: inevitability, reported

kin·dle 1

 (kĭn′dl)
v. kin·dled, kin·dling, kin·dles
v.tr.
1.
a. To build or fuel (a fire).
b. To set fire to; ignite.
2. To cause to glow; light up: The sunset kindled the skies.
3. To arouse (an emotion, for example): "No spark had yet kindled in him an intellectual passion" (George Eliot).
v.intr.
1. To catch fire; burst into flame.
2. To become bright; glow.
3. To become inflamed.
4. To be stirred up; rise.

[Middle English kindelen (influenced by kindelen, to give birth to, cause), probably from Old Norse kynda.]

kin′dler n.

kin·dle 2

 (kĭn′dl)
intr.v. kin·dled, kin·dling, kin·dles
To give birth to young. Used especially of rabbits.
n.
A brood or litter, especially of kittens.

[Middle English kindelen, from kindel, offspring, from Old English gecynd; see kind2.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.kindled - set afire; "the ignited paper"; "a kindled fire"
lighted, lit - set afire or burning; "the lighted candles"; "a lighted cigarette"; "a lit firecracker"
References in classic literature ?
said Jo, turning very pale, while her eyes kindled and her hands clutched Amy nervously.
When he spoke of courage, their looks were firm and responsive; when he alluded to their injuries, their eyes kindled with fury; when he mentioned the taunts of the women, they dropped their heads in shame; but when he pointed out their means of vengeance, he struck a chord which never failed to thrill in the breast of an Indian.
I kindled a fire near a fountain of sweet water, and feasted on the loin of a buck, which a few hours before I had killed.
These were some of the fantasies which she had long dreamed about; and, aided by these, Uncle Venner's casual attempt at encouragement kindled a strange festal glory in the poor, bare, melancholy chambers of her brain, as if that inner world were suddenly lighted up with gas.
Certainly, if the meteor kindled up the sky, and disclosed the earth, with an awfulness that admonished Hester Prynne and the clergyman of the day of judgment, then might Roger Chillingworth have passed with them for the arch-fiend, standing there with a smile and scowl, to claim his own.