kindred


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Related to kindred: Kindred Spirit

kin·dred

 (kĭn′drĭd)
n.
1. A group of related persons, as a clan or tribe.
2. (used with a pl. verb) A person's relatives; kinfolk.
adj.
1. Of the same ancestry or family: kindred clans.
2. Having a similar or related origin, nature, or character: kindred emotions.

[Middle English kinrede, kindrede, from Late Old English cynrēde : cyn, kin; see genə- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots + -rēde, condition (from Old English rǣden, -rǣden, condition; see ar- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots).]

kin′dred·ness n.

kindred

(ˈkɪndrɪd)
adj
1. having similar or common qualities, origin, etc
2. related by blood or marriage
3. kindred spirit a person with whom one has something in common
n
4. relationship by blood
5. similarity in character
6. a person's relatives collectively
[C12 kinred, from kin + -red, from Old English rǣden rule, from rǣdan to rule]
ˈkindredness, ˈkindredˌship n

kin•dred

(ˈkɪn drɪd)

n.
1. kin; kinfolk.
2. relationship by birth or descent, or sometimes by marriage.
adj.
3. having the same belief, attitude, or feeling.
4. associated by origin, nature, qualities, etc.
5. related by birth or descent.
[1125–75; Middle English, variant of kinrede]

Kindred

 kinsfolk or relatives, collectively, 1225.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kindred - group of people related by blood or marriagekindred - group of people related by blood or marriage
social group - people sharing some social relation
mishpachah, mishpocha - (Yiddish) the entire family network of relatives by blood or marriage (and sometimes close friends); "she invited the whole mishpocha"
family unit, family - primary social group; parents and children; "he wanted to have a good job before starting a family"
folks - your parents; "he wrote to his folks every day"
family tree, genealogy - successive generations of kin
totem - a clan or tribe identified by their kinship to a common totemic object
Tribes of Israel, Twelve Tribes of Israel - twelve kin groups of ancient Israel each traditionally descended from one of the twelve sons of Jacob
relative, relation - a person related by blood or marriage; "police are searching for relatives of the deceased"; "he has distant relations back in New Jersey"
clan member, clansman, clanswoman - a member of a clan
tribesman - someone who lives in a tribe
Adj.1.kindred - similar in quality or character; "a feeling akin to terror"; "kindred souls"; "the amateur is closely related to the collector"
similar - marked by correspondence or resemblance; "similar food at similar prices"; "problems similar to mine"; "they wore similar coats"
2.kindred - related by blood or marriage; "kindred clans"
related - connected by kinship, common origin, or marriage

kindred

noun
1. family, relations, relatives, connections, flesh, kin, lineage, kinsmen, kinsfolk The offender made proper restitution to the victim's kindred.
adjective
1. similar, like, related, allied, corresponding, affiliated, akin, kin, cognate, matching I recall discussions with her on these and kindred topics.

kindred

noun
1. A group of people sharing common ancestry:
2. One's relatives collectively:
adjective
Connected by or as if by kinship or common origin:
Translations
أقارِب، أنْسِباء، أهْلمُشابِه
beslægtetslægt
fjölskyldalíkur, ámóta
līdzīgsradiradiniekiradniecībaradniecīgs
akrabalaraynı türden olan

kindred

[ˈkɪndrɪd]
A. ADJ (= related by blood or group) → emparentado; [language] → de un tronco común (fig) → afín, semejante
kindred spiritsalmas fpl gemelas
to have a kindred feeling for sbsentirse hermano de algn
B. N (= relations) → familia f, parientes mpl

kindred

[ˈkɪndrɪd] adj (= similar) → apparenté(e)kindred spirit nâme f sœur
We are kindred spirits → Nous sommes des âmesurs.

kindred

n no pl (= relatives)Verwandtschaft f
adj (= related)verwandt; kindred spiritGleichgesinnte(r) mf

kindred

[ˈkɪndrɪd]
1. adj (tribes, peoples) → imparentato/a; (language) → affine
to have a kindred feeling for sb → sentirsi molto vicino/a a qn
2. n (relations) → familiari mpl, parenti mpl

kindred

(ˈkindrid) noun plural
one's relatives.
adjective
of the same sort. climbing and kindred sports.

kin·dred

n. parentesco.
References in classic literature ?
March, feeling that he had got a kindred spirit, opened his choicest stores for his guest's benefit, while silent John listened and enjoyed the talk, but said not a word, and Mr.
There would have been a species of profanity in the omission, had this man passed so powerful a community of his fancied kindred, without bestowing some evidence of his regard.
Or the member of Parliament, now at the head of the English branch of the family, --with which the elder stock, on this side of the Atlantic, had held little or no intercourse for the last two centuries,--this eminent gentleman might invite Hepzibah to quit the ruinous House of the Seven Gables, and come over to dwell with her kindred at Pyncheon Hall.
This long connexion of a family with one spot, as its place of birth and burial, creates a kindred between the human being and the locality, quite independent of any charm in the scenery or moral circumstances that surround him.
Yes, here were a set of sea-dogs, many of whom without the slightest bashfulness had boarded great whales on the high seas --entire strangers to them --and duelled them dead without winking; and yet, here they sat at a social breakfast table --all of the same calling, all of kindred tastes --looking round as sheepishly at each other as though they had never been out of sight of some sheepfold among the Green Mountains.
But if the doctrine of Fast-Fish be pretty generally applicable, the kindred doctrine of Loose-Fish is still more widely so.
He thought of how he should make out his gang; he thought of the respective market value of certain supposititious men and women and children who were to compose it, and other kindred topics of the business; then he thought of himself, and how humane he was, that whereas other men chained their "niggers" hand and foot both, he only put fetters on the feet, and left Tom the use of his hands, as long as he behaved well; and he sighed to think how ungrateful human nature was, so that there was even room to doubt whether Tom appreciated his mercies.
I know that most men think differently from myself; but those whose lives are by profession devoted to the study of these or kindred subjects content me as little as any.
Which is to assert an always self-proven fact: that even the best governed and most free and most enlightened monarchy is still behind the best condition attainable by its people; and that the same is true of kindred governments of lower grades, all the way down to the lowest.
It was a good show, and as stately and complex as guard-mount and the trooping of the colors; and it had its own special music, composed for the occasion by the bandmaster of the Seventh; and the child was as serious as the most serious war-worn soldier of them all; and finally when they throned her upon the shoulder of the oldest veteran, and pronounced her "well and truly adopted," and the bands struck up and all saluted and she saluted in return, it was better and more moving than any kindred thing I have seen on the stage, because stage things are make-believe, but this was real and the players' hearts were in it.
At first the talk was a little gloomy, and ran mainly upon the shortness of life, the uncertainty of it, the perils which beset it, and the need and wisdom of being always prepared for the worst; this shaded off into low-voiced references to the dangers of the deep, and kindred matters; but as the gray east began to redden and the mysterious solemnity and silence of the dawn to give place to the joy-songs of the birds, the talk took a cheerier tone, and our spirits began to rise steadily.
A single word from the white men was enough--against all our wishes, prayers, and entreaties--to sunder forever the dearest friends, dearest kindred, and strongest ties known to human beings.