king's peace


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king's peace

n
1. (Historical Terms) (in early medieval England) the protection secured by the king for particular people or places
2. (Historical Terms) (in medieval England) the general peace secured to the entire realm by the law administered in the king's name
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References in classic literature ?
While these resolute and determined preparations for the conservation of the king's peace were pending, Mr.
In particular, the right to travel armed for reasons of self-defense was always balanced against the need to preserve the King's Peace.
The Sheriff is an annual appointment by warrant from the Privy Council and the role can trace its origins beyond the tenth century when the 'reeve' was the keeper of the King's peace throughout the county.
No law specifically censored political speech, leaving only the much higher legal threshold of "disturbing the King's peace.
officials said they valued the King's peace efforts and his wise approach towards various Middle East challenges, pledging to work with the U.
The first book she had published - in keeping with her Celtic roots - was an Arthurian fantasy called The King's Peace, published in 2000.
The Act reflected the importance of the King's Peace where men, women and children should be able to go about their daily lives free from threat or violence.
It was in 1195 this post of Justice of the Peace was created by Richard I in England widely became known as King's Peace.
But he was just a fixer, not to be blamed for what went first, him being only the cover-up man, the preserver of the King's peace, a minor Lord Muck in the area, and God forgive him for all that he'd done, but his was not the leading role.
Specific subjects include seventeenth-century Gaelic Ireland, eighteenth-century Wales, images of king's peace and bounty in bardic poetry, satire in seventeenth and eighteenth century Gaelic poetry, and the role of Tain Bo Flidais in the growth and development of the late Ulster Cycle of works.
In other words, crime became a breach of the King's peace.
There are some historians who continue to believe that the late medieval justices of the peace acted as a kind of mafia, appropriating the King's peace for the pursuit of their own personal and class interests; but increasingly it is now argued that the placing of such power in the hands of the elite had the effect of mobilising the energies of the political classes, and especially the gentry, in the service of the state and creating within these groups a much keener sense of responsibility to upholding the authority of the crown.