knavery


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knav·er·y

 (nā′və-rē)
n. pl. knav·er·ies
1. Dishonest or crafty dealing.
2. An instance of trickery or mischief.

knavery

(ˈneɪvərɪ)
n, pl -eries
1. a deceitful or dishonest act
2. dishonest conduct; trickery

knav•er•y

(ˈneɪ və ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
1. unprincipled or dishonest dealing; trickery.
2. a knavish act or practice.
[1520–30]

knavery

petty dishonesty or fraud. — knave, n. — knavish, adj.
See also: Crime
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knavery - lack of honesty; acts of lying or cheating or stealing
actus reus, wrongful conduct, misconduct, wrongdoing - activity that transgresses moral or civil law; "he denied any wrongdoing"
betrayal, perfidy, treachery, treason - an act of deliberate betrayal
charlatanism, quackery - the dishonesty of a charlatan
trick - an attempt to get you to do something foolish or imprudent; "that offer was a dirty trick"
falsehood, falsification - the act of rendering something false as by fraudulent changes (of documents or measures etc.) or counterfeiting

knavery

noun (Old-fashioned) dishonesty, fraud, corruption, deception, deceit, trickery, duplicity, double-dealing, chicanery, villainy, imposture, roguery, rascality a hotbed of intrigue and malicious knavery
Translations

knavery

[ˈneɪvərɪ] Nbellaquería f

knavery

n (old)Bubenstück nt (old), → Büberei f (old)
References in classic literature ?
Mercury, displeased at his knavery, not only took away the golden axe, but refused to recover for him the axe he had thrown into the pool.
The adventures of his rogue of a hero, who began life as the servant and accomplice of a blind beggar, and then adventured on through a most diverting career of knavery, brought back the atmosphere of Don Quixote, and all the landscape of that dear wonder- world of Spain, where I had lived so much, and I followed him with all the old delight.
Monks, still bearing that assumed name, retired with his portion to a distant part of the New World; where, having quickly squandered it, he once more fell into his old courses, and, after undergoing a long confinement for some fresh act of fraud and knavery, at length sunk under an attack of his old disorder, and died in prison.
The farmer, seeing before him this figure in full armour brandishing a lance over his head, gave himself up for dead, and made answer meekly, "Sir Knight, this youth that I am chastising is my servant, employed by me to watch a flock of sheep that I have hard by, and he is so careless that I lose one every day, and when I punish him for his carelessness and knavery he says I do it out of niggardliness, to escape paying him the wages I owe him, and before God, and on my soul, he lies.
Even if his father could not be persuaded, they could fly to Ptarth, laying all the blame of the knavery and intrigue that had thrown four great nations into war, upon the shoulders of Nutus.
From whence is it that the knave is generally so quick-sighted to those symptoms and operations of knavery, which often dupe an honest man of a much better understanding?
Visions of gallantry, knavery, robbery; and of the nightly absences from home for which he had accounted so strangely, having been occasioned by some unlawful pursuit; flocked into her brain and rendered her afraid to question him.
Tis a safe thing to calculate on the knavery of an Iroquois," said the scout, throwing his rifle forward, by a sort of instinctive movement.
Eventually he proclaims, "I would we were well rid of this knavery.
Iago's only bond with his wife Emilia is not intimate, or even affectionate, and it becomes the means that undoes him when he believes he must kill her to prevent her from revealing his knavery.
against the knavery of their clients, by disabling clients from
If the world knew the villainy and knavery (beside ignorance) of the physicians and apothecaries', John Aubrey was told by a doctor, `the people would throw stones at 'em as they walked in the streets'.