knelt


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knelt

 (nĕlt)
v.
A past tense and a past participle of kneel.

knelt

(nɛlt)
vb
a past tense and past participle of kneel

kneel

(nil)

v.i. knelt kneeled, kneel•ing.
to go down or rest on the knees or a knee.
[before 1000; Middle English knelen, Old English cnēowlian (c. Middle Low German knēlen, Dutch knielen). See knee, -le]
References in classic literature ?
In the son's presence she was timid and reserved, but sometimes while he hurried about town intent upon his duties as a reporter, she went into his room and closing the door knelt by a little desk, made of a kitchen table, that sat near a window.
complained Tom, after having been knelt to by the Indian's wife and child, who called him the "preserver" and other endearing titles of the same kind.
Shimerda rose, crossed himself, and quietly knelt down before the tree, his head sunk forward.
Inaudible the creaking joints of her stiffened knees, as she knelt down by the bedside.
Old Roger Chillingworth knelt down beside him, with a blank, dull countenance, out of which the life seemed to have departed,
Tom knelt before him, with clasped hands, and with an absorbed expression of love, trust, adoration, on his quiet face.
At a sign from a sort of master of ceremonies, six or eight of the prisoners rose and came forward in a body and knelt on the floor and lifted up their hands toward the ladies' gallery and begged the grace of a word with the queen.
We bore her home, all mangled and drenched in blood, and knelt by her and listened to her broken and wandering words, and prayed for her passing spirit, and there was no comfort - nor ever will be, I think.
Then he knelt by the fire and painfully wrote something upon each of these with his "red keel"; one he rolled up and put in his jacket pocket, and the other he put in Joe's hat and removed it to a little distance from the owner.
Now, like Mira, it was cold and quiet, wrapped in its shroud of snow; but Rebecca knelt by the brink, and putting her ear to the glaze of ice, fancied, where it used to be deepest, she could hear a faint, tinkling sound.
The impulse of gratitude swelled my heart, and I knelt down at the bedside, and offered up thanks where thanks were due; not forgetting, ere I rose, to implore aid on my further path, and the power of meriting the kindness which seemed so frankly offered me before it was earned.
Heathcliff had knelt on one knee to embrace her; he attempted to rise, but she seized his hair, and kept him down.