knelt


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knelt

 (nĕlt)
v.
A past tense and a past participle of kneel.

knelt

(nɛlt)
vb
a past tense and past participle of kneel

kneel

(nil)

v.i. knelt kneeled, kneel•ing.
to go down or rest on the knees or a knee.
[before 1000; Middle English knelen, Old English cnēowlian (c. Middle Low German knēlen, Dutch knielen). See knee, -le]
References in classic literature ?
As she knelt down, the border of her garment was dipped into the pool; she laid her forehead on the old woman's knees, and the latter drew a cloak about the lady's face, so that she was in darkness.
Anne knelt at Marilla's knee and looked up gravely.
Ojo knelt again and by feeling carefully in the dark managed to fill the flask with the unseen water that was in the well.
The King knelt beside the still form, across the breast of which lay the unconscious body of Bertrade de Montfort.
Next morning he was up and washed and dressed, all but his jacket and waistcoat, just as the ten minutes' bell began to ring, and then in the face of the whole room knelt down to pray.
Shimerda rose, crossed himself, and quietly knelt down before the tree, his head sunk forward.
His own, so cold and dark and dreary, his empty gardens where no flowers could bloom, no green trees dwell, or gay birds sing, all desolate and dim;--and while he gazed, his own Spirits, casting off their dark mantles, knelt before him and besought him not to send them forth to blight the things the gentle Fairies loved so much.
So the Waggoner threw down his whip, and knelt down and prayed to Hercules the Strong.
He knelt down just opposite the chapel in order not to lose sight of his man; and as he had almost forgotten his prayers and had omitted to take a book with him, he made use of his time in gazing at Bazin.
complained Tom, after having been knelt to by the Indian's wife and child, who called him the "preserver" and other endearing titles of the same kind.
Sancho went off at top speed, forcing Dapple out of his regular pace, and came to where the fair huntress was standing, and dismounting knelt before her and said, "Fair lady, that knight that you see there, the Knight of the Lions by name, is my master, and I am a squire of his, and at home they call me Sancho Panza.
Unexpectedly, in the middle of the service, and not in the usual order Natasha knew so well, the deacon brought out a small stool, the one he knelt on when praying on Trinity Sunday, and placed it before the doors of the sanctuary screen.