knew


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knew

 (no͞o, nyo͞o)
v.
Past tense of know.

knew

(njuː)
vb
the past tense of know

know

(noʊ)

v. knew, known, know•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to perceive or understand as fact or truth; apprehend clearly and with certainty.
2. to have fixed in the mind or memory: to know a poem by heart.
3. to be cognizant of: I know it.
4. to be acquainted or familiar with (a thing, place, person, etc.): I know the mayor well.
5. to understand from experience or practice: to know how to make gingerbread.
6. to be able to distinguish, as one from another: to know right from wrong.
7. to recognize: I'd know her if I saw her again.
8. Archaic. to have sexual intercourse with.
v.i.
9. to have knowledge or clear and certain perception, as of fact or truth.
10. to be cognizant or aware, as of some circumstance or occurrence; have information.
n.
11. the fact or state of knowing; knowledge.
Idioms:
in the know, privy to information.
[before 900; Middle English knowen, knawen, Old English gecnāwan; c. Old High German -cnāhan, Old Norse knā to know how, be able to; akin to Latin(g)nōscere, Greek gignṓskein. See gnostic, can1]
know′a•ble, adj.
know′er, n.
Translations

know

(nəu) past tense knew (njuː) : past participle known verb
1. to be aware of or to have been informed about. He knows everything; I know he is at home because his car is in the drive; He knows all about it; I know of no reason why you cannot go.
2. to have learned and to remember. He knows a lot of poetry.
3. to be aware of the identity of; to be friendly with. I know Mrs Smith – she lives near me.
4. to (be able to) recognize or identify. You would hardly know her now – she has become very thin; He knows a good car when he sees one.
ˈknowing adjective
showing secret understanding. She gave him a knowing look.
ˈknowingly adverb
1. in a knowing manner. She smiled knowingly.
2. deliberately or on purpose. He would not knowingly insult her.
ˈknow-all noun
an unkind name for a person who thinks he knows everything.
ˈknow-how noun
the practical knowledge and skill to deal with something. She has acquired a lot of know-how about cars.
in the know
having information possessed only by a small group of people. People in the know tell me that she is the most likely person to get the job.
know backwards
to know extremely well or perfectly. He knows his history backwards.
know better
to be too wise or well-taught (to do something). She should know better at her age!; He should have known better than to trust them.
know how to
to have learned the way to. She already knew how to read when she went to school.
know the ropes
to understand the detail and procedure of a job etc.
References in classic literature ?
She knew it very well, for it was that beautiful old story of the best life ever lived, and Jo felt that it was a true guidebook for any pilgrim going on a long journey.
By chance David's father knew that he had disap- peared.
He says he knows it was all his fault, though he is sure he did the best he knew, and he says if Beauty dies no one will ever speak to him again.
Her next question and your next answer informed me that this person was a friend of my sister's, who felt a strong interest in her, and who knew that you had just returned from a visit to Norah.
He knew her to be so, without looking at her, and said:
The instant the housekeeper knew who it was, she ran to hide herself so as not to see him; in such abhorrence did she hold him.
That he had insulted you deeply I knew from my own feelings, for I felt insulted in an equal degree.
He knew that tree well; it was the boundary mark of his youth--the sign, to him, of the time when some of his earliest, strongest feelings had left him.
Later, at sea, he used to refer to La Senora in a particular tone and I knew that henceforth his devotion was not for me alone.
I never knew him myself; I only heard of him; but there was a something in his conduct then, with regard to my father and sister, and afterwards in the circumstances of his marriage, which I never could quite reconcile with present times.
I knew him at once, because I happened to have watched him make his hundred at Lord's only the day before.
We didn't know whether you knew or not; it made all the difference to us; and somebody had to dog you and find out how much you did know.