knight


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knight

 (nīt)
n.
1.
a. A medieval tenant giving military service as a mounted man-at-arms to a feudal landholder.
b. A medieval gentleman-soldier, usually high-born, raised by a sovereign to privileged military status after training as a page and squire.
c. A man holding a nonhereditary title conferred by a sovereign in recognition of personal merit or service to the country.
2. A man belonging to an order or brotherhood.
3.
a. A defender, champion, or zealous upholder of a cause or principle.
b. The devoted champion of a lady.
4. Abbr. Kt or N Games A chess piece, usually in the shape of a horse's head, that can be moved two squares along a rank and one along a file or two squares along a file and one along a rank. The knight is the only piece that can jump other pieces to land on an open square.
tr.v. knight·ed, knight·ing, knights
To raise (a person) to knighthood.

[Middle English, from Old English cniht.]

knight′ly adj. & adv.
knight′li·ness n.

knight

(naɪt)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in medieval Europe)
a. (originally) a person who served his lord as a mounted and heavily armed soldier
b. (later) a gentleman invested by a king or other lord with the military and social standing of this rank
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in modern times) a person invested by a sovereign with a nonhereditary rank and dignity usually in recognition of personal services, achievements, etc. A British knight bears the title Sir placed before his name, as in Sir Winston Churchill
3. (Chess & Draughts) a chess piece, usually shaped like a horse's head, that moves either two squares horizontally and one square vertically or one square horizontally and two squares vertically
4. a heroic champion of a lady or of a cause or principle
5. (Historical Terms) a member of the Roman class of the equites
vb
(tr) to make (a person) a knight; dub
[Old English cniht servant; related to Old High German kneht boy]

Knight

(naɪt)
n
(Biography) Dame Laura. 1887–1970, British painter, noted for her paintings of Gypsies, the ballet, and the circus

knight

(naɪt)
n.
1. (in the Middle Ages)
a. a mounted soldier serving under a feudal superior.
b. a man, usu. of noble birth, who after serving as page and squire was raised to honorable military rank and bound to chivalrous conduct.
2. any person of a rank similar to that of the medieval knight.
3. a man upon whom nonhereditary knighthood is conferred by a sovereign, in Great Britain ranking next below a baronet.
4. a member of any association that designates its members as knights.
5. a chess piece shaped like a horse's head, moved one square vertically and then two squares horizontally or one square horizontally and two squares vertically.
v.t.
6. to dub or make (a man) a knight.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English cniht boy, manservant; c. Old High German kneht]

knight

  • esquire - At its root, it means "shield bearer (in service to a knight)," from Latin scutarius.
  • forget-me-nots - May have gotten their name from the last words of a knight who drowned while trying to pick these flowers by a riverside.
  • heart on one's sleeve - Comes from chivalry, when a knight wore a scarf or other item from his lady tied to his sleeve.

knight


Past participle: knighted
Gerund: knighting

Imperative
knight
knight
Present
I knight
you knight
he/she/it knights
we knight
you knight
they knight
Preterite
I knighted
you knighted
he/she/it knighted
we knighted
you knighted
they knighted
Present Continuous
I am knighting
you are knighting
he/she/it is knighting
we are knighting
you are knighting
they are knighting
Present Perfect
I have knighted
you have knighted
he/she/it has knighted
we have knighted
you have knighted
they have knighted
Past Continuous
I was knighting
you were knighting
he/she/it was knighting
we were knighting
you were knighting
they were knighting
Past Perfect
I had knighted
you had knighted
he/she/it had knighted
we had knighted
you had knighted
they had knighted
Future
I will knight
you will knight
he/she/it will knight
we will knight
you will knight
they will knight
Future Perfect
I will have knighted
you will have knighted
he/she/it will have knighted
we will have knighted
you will have knighted
they will have knighted
Future Continuous
I will be knighting
you will be knighting
he/she/it will be knighting
we will be knighting
you will be knighting
they will be knighting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been knighting
you have been knighting
he/she/it has been knighting
we have been knighting
you have been knighting
they have been knighting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been knighting
you will have been knighting
he/she/it will have been knighting
we will have been knighting
you will have been knighting
they will have been knighting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been knighting
you had been knighting
he/she/it had been knighting
we had been knighting
you had been knighting
they had been knighting
Conditional
I would knight
you would knight
he/she/it would knight
we would knight
you would knight
they would knight
Past Conditional
I would have knighted
you would have knighted
he/she/it would have knighted
we would have knighted
you would have knighted
they would have knighted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knight - originally a person of noble birth trained to arms and chivalryknight - originally a person of noble birth trained to arms and chivalry; today in Great Britain a person honored by the sovereign for personal merit
carpet knight - a knight who spends his time in luxury and idleness (knighted on the carpet at court rather than on the field of battle)
bachelor-at-arms, knight bachelor, bachelor - a knight of the lowest order; could display only a pennon
banneret, knight banneret, knight of the square flag - a knight honored for valor; entitled to display a square banner and to hold higher command
Knight of the Round Table - in the Arthurian legend, a knight of King Arthur's court
knight-errant - a wandering knight travelling in search of adventure
Templar, Knight Templar - a knight of a religious military order established in 1118 to protect pilgrims and the Holy Sepulcher
male aristocrat - a man who is an aristocrat
2.knight - a chessman shaped to resemble the head of a horse; can move two squares horizontally and one vertically (or vice versa)
chess game, chess - a board game for two players who move their 16 pieces according to specific rules; the object is to checkmate the opponent's king
chess piece, chessman - any of 16 white and 16 black pieces used in playing the game of chess
Verb1.knight - raise (someone) to knighthood; "The Beatles were knighted"
ennoble, gentle, entitle - give a title to someone; make someone a member of the nobility

knight

noun cavalier, equestrian, horseman, gallant, chevalier, champion I wish I were a fit knight for the sea princess.
knight in shining armour saviour, deliverer, hero, defender, guardian, salvation, rescuer, protector, good Samaritan, redeemer, preserver believing in happy endings and knights in shining armour
Translations
حامِل وِسام رُتْبَة فارِسفارسفارِسفَرَس في لُعْبَة الشَّطْرَنْجيَمْنَح لَقَب فارِس
конрицар
jezdecpasovatrytíř
ridderspringer
ĉevalokavaliro
caballerocaballocaballo (chess)
hevonenlyödä ritariksiratsuritari
konjskakačvitez
lovaggá üthuszárlovag
riddarisá sem sæmdur er riddaratignslá til riddara
eques
„knight“ titulassuteikti „knight“ tituląžirgas
bruņinieksiecelt bruņinieku kārtāpiešķirt muižnieku kārtas tituluzirdziņš
jazdecpasovať na rytiera
vitezkonjskakač
dubbahästknektriddarespringare
atşövalyeşövalye unvanı vermekşövalye yapmaksir ünvanlı kimse

knight

[naɪt]
A. N (Hist) → caballero m (Chess) → caballo m; (modern) (Brit) → Sir m caballero de una orden
knight in shining armourpríncipe m azul
Knight (of the Order) of the Garter (Brit) → caballero m de la orden de la Jarretera
B. VT (Hist) → armar caballero; (modern) (Brit) → otorgar el título de Sir a
C. CPD knight errant Ncaballero m andante
Knight Templar Ncaballero m templario, templario m

knight

[ˈnaɪt]
n
(= nobleman) → chevalier m
the knights of the Round Table → les chevaliers de la Table Ronde
(= chessman) → cavalier m
vt (= confer knighthood on) → faire chevalier
to be knighted → être fait chevalier

knight

n (= title, Hist) → Ritter m; (Chess) → Springer m, → Pferd(chen) nt, → Rössel nt; Knight of the GarterTräger(in) m(f)des Hosenbandordens; knight of the road (Brit hum) → Kapitän mder Landstraße (hum); a knight in shining armour (fig)ein Märchenprinz m

knight

:
knight errant
n pl <knights errant> → fahrender Ritter
knight errantry

knight

[naɪt]
1. ncavaliere m (Chess) → cavallo

knight

(nait) noun
1. in earlier times, a man of noble birth who is trained to fight, especially on horseback. King Arthur and his knights.
2. a man of rank, having the title `Sir'. Sir John Brown was made a knight in 1969.
3. a piece used in chess, usually shaped like a horse's head.
verb
to make (a person) a knight. He was knighted for his services to industry.
ˈknighthood noun
the rank or title of a knight. He received a knighthood from the Queen.
References in classic literature ?
He meant to write a poem in twelve books, each book containing the adventures of a knight who was to show forth one virtue.
The first three books tell the adventures of the Red Cross Knight St.
and a Knight dressed in crimson armour came galloping down upon her, brandishing a great club.
He drew up at Alice's side, and tumbled off his horse just as the Red Knight had done: then he got on again, and the two Knights sat and looked at each other for some time without speaking.
no knight here will lay lance in rest if such an insult is attempted.
Secondly, any knight proposing to combat, might, if he pleased, select a special antagonist from among the challengers, by touching his shield.
Along the causeway rode a knight with a score of stout men-at-arms behind him.
There the Knight called to one of his men and bade him knock at the porter's lodge with the heft of his sword.
Then answered him the gentle knight With words both fair and thee: "God save thee, my good Robin, And all thy company
While Robin and Marian were having their encounter with the stag, Little John, Much the miller's son, and Will Scarlet had sallied forth to watch the highroad leading to Barnesdale, if perchance they might find some haughty knight or fat priest whose wallet needed lightening.
I looked for no less, my lord, from your High Magnificence," replied Don Quixote, "and I have to tell you that the boon I have asked and your liberality has granted is that you shall dub me knight to-morrow morning, and that to-night I shall watch my arms in the chapel of this your castle; thus tomorrow, as I have said, will be accomplished what I so much desire, enabling me lawfully to roam through all the four quarters of the world seeking adventures on behalf of those in distress, as is the duty of chivalry and of knights-errant like myself, whose ambition is directed to such deeds.
Those banks of beautiful ladies, shining in their barbaric splendors, would see a knight sprawl from his horse in the lists with a lance- shaft the thickness of your ankle clean through him and the blood spouting, and instead of fainting they would clap their hands and crowd each other for a better view; only sometimes one would dive into her handkerchief, and look ostentatiously broken-hearted, and then you could lay two to one that there was a scandal there somewhere and she was afraid the public hadn't found it out.