knightly


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

knight

 (nīt)
n.
1.
a. A medieval tenant giving military service as a mounted man-at-arms to a feudal landholder.
b. A medieval gentleman-soldier, usually high-born, raised by a sovereign to privileged military status after training as a page and squire.
c. A man holding a nonhereditary title conferred by a sovereign in recognition of personal merit or service to the country.
2. A man belonging to an order or brotherhood.
3.
a. A defender, champion, or zealous upholder of a cause or principle.
b. The devoted champion of a lady.
4. Abbr. Kt or N Games A chess piece, usually in the shape of a horse's head, that can be moved two squares along a rank and one along a file or two squares along a file and one along a rank. The knight is the only piece that can jump other pieces to land on an open square.
tr.v. knight·ed, knight·ing, knights
To raise (a person) to knighthood.

[Middle English, from Old English cniht.]

knight′ly adj. & adv.
knight′li·ness n.

knightly

(ˈnaɪtlɪ)
adj, -lier or -liest
of, relating to, resembling, or befitting a knight
ˈknightliness n

knight•ly

(ˈnaɪt li)

adj.
1. of, resembling, or characteristic of a knight.
2. composed of knights.
[before 1000]
knight′li•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.knightly - characteristic of the time of chivalry and knighthood in the Middle Agesknightly - characteristic of the time of chivalry and knighthood in the Middle Ages; "chivalric rites"; "the knightly years"
past - earlier than the present time; no longer current; "time past"; "his youth is past"; "this past Thursday"; "the past year"
2.knightly - being attentive to women like an ideal knightknightly - being attentive to women like an ideal knight
courteous - characterized by courtesy and gracious good manners; "if a man be gracious and courteous to strangers it shows he is a citizen of the world"-Francis Bacon

knightly

adjective chivalrous, noble, heroic, courageous, gracious, gallant, valiant, courtly the splendour of knightly days, recreated for modern visitors

knightly

adjective
Characterized by elaborate but usually formal courtesy:
Translations

knightly

[ˈnaɪtlɪ] ADJcaballeroso, caballeresco

knightly

adj (+er)ritterlich
References in classic literature ?
Don Quixote went off satisfied, elated, and vain-glorious in the highest degree at having won a victory over such a valiant knight as he fancied him of the Mirrors to be, and one from whose knightly word he expected to learn whether the enchantment of his lady still continued; inasmuch as the said vanquished knight was bound, under the penalty of ceasing to be one, to return and render him an account of what took place between him and her.
Those were the knightly days of our profession, when we only bore arms to succor the distressed, and not to fill men's lamp-feeders.
This dignity and these knightly graces suggest the tournament, not the prize-fight.
High deeds achieved of knightly fame, From Palestine the champion came; The cross upon his shoulders borne, Battle and blast had dimm'd and torn.
The Sir Richard of the Lea, divining that the Sheriff had been at the King's ear with his story, made a clean breast of all he knew; how that the outlaws had befriended him in sore need--as they had befriended others--and how that he had given them only knightly protection in return.
And this is one of those gales whose memory in after-years returns, welcome in dignified austerity, as you would remember with pleasure the noble features of a stranger with whom you crossed swords once in knightly encounter and are never to see again.
Don't you really know, Durbeyfield, that you are the lineal representative of the ancient and knightly family of the d'Urbervilles, who derive their descent from Sir Pagan d'Urberville, that renowned knight who came from Normandy with William the Conqueror, as appears by Battle Abbey Roll?
Here is a crumbling wall that was old when Columbus discovered America; was old when Peter the Hermit roused the knightly men of the Middle Ages to arm for the first Crusade; was old when Charlemagne and his paladins beleaguered enchanted castles and battled with giants and genii in the fabled days of the olden time; was old when Christ and his disciples walked the earth; stood where it stands today when the lips of Memnon were vocal and men bought and sold in the streets of ancient Thebes!
The knightly, chivalrous King set his country high among the countries of Europe.
The first of all was a tall, thin man, of knightly bearing, dressed all in black silk, with a black velvet cap upon his head, turned up with scarlet.
Lawk no, kind sir," she answered, clutching her bacon the tighter, as though some design upon it might be hid under this knightly offer.
And when Sir Launcelot heard this he rose up, and looked out at the window, and saw by the moonlight three knights come riding after that one man, and all three lashed on him at once with swords, and that one knight turned on them knightly again and defended him.