knock back


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knock

 (nŏk)
v. knocked, knock·ing, knocks
v.tr.
1. To strike with a hard blow: knocked him on the head.
2. To affect in a specified way by striking hard: knocked the mugger senseless.
3. To cause to be displaced or unengaged; force: a wind that knocked the tower over; a blunder that knocked him out of the job.
4. To cause to collide: I knocked my head on a low beam.
5. To produce by hitting or striking: knocked a hole in the wall.
6. Informal To find fault with; criticize: Don't knock the food; it's free.
v.intr.
1. To strike a sharp audible blow or series of blows, as on a door.
2. To collide with something: knocked into the table.
3. To make a pounding or clanking noise: The car engine is knocking.
n.
1. An instance of striking or colliding.
2. The sound of a sharp blow on a hard surface.
3. A pounding or clanking noise made by an engine, often as a result of faulty fuel combustion. Also called ping.
4. Slang A cutting, often petty criticism.
Phrasal Verbs:
knock around (or about) Informal
1. To be rough or brutal with; maltreat.
2. To wander from place to place: knocking around Europe.
3. To discuss or consider: met to knock around some ideas.
knock back Informal
To gulp (an alcoholic drink).
knock down
1. To bring to the ground with a blow or other forceful action; topple.
2. To disassemble into parts, as for storage or shipping.
3. To declare sold at an auction, as by striking a blow with a gavel.
4. To reduce in amount or intensity: a retailer who knocked down the price by 20 percent; firefighters who knocked down the fire enough to search the house.
5. Slang To receive as wages; earn: knocks down $50 an hour.
knock off
1. Informal
a. To take a break or rest from; stop: knocked off work at noon.
b. To cease work: It's after five; let's knock off.
2. Informal To complete, accomplish, or dispose of hastily or easily; finish: That author knocks off a book a year.
3. Informal To get rid of; eliminate: knocked off 12 pounds in a month.
4. Slang To kill or overcome.
5. Slang To hold up or rob: knocked off a bank.
6. Informal To copy or imitate, especially without permission: knocking off someone else's ideas.
knock out
1. To render unconscious.
2. Sports To defeat (a boxing opponent) by a knockout.
3. To render useless or inoperative: The storm knocked out the phones.
4. Informal To excite or overwhelm, especially by being sexually attractive.
5. Informal To exert or exhaust (oneself or another) to the utmost: knocked herself out to be ready on time.
6. Informal To produce in abundance: The workers knocked out 500 parts in one hour.
7. To inactivate (a gene or genes) by genetic manipulation so that the resulting phenotypic effects can be observed.
knock together
To make or assemble quickly or carelessly.
knock up
1. Derogatory Slang To make pregnant.
2. Chiefly British To wake up or summon, as by knocking at the door.
3. Chiefly British To wear out; exhaust.
Idioms:
have it knocked Slang
To be certain of success: "He knew he had it knocked after he saw a rough cut of Chinatown" (Time).
knock cold
To render unconscious; knock out.
knock dead
1. To kill with a blow.
2. Slang To affect strongly and positively: a performance that knocked the audience dead.
knock it off Slang
To stop doing something. Often used in the imperative: He asked us to knock it off.
knock out of the box Baseball
To force the removal of (an opposing pitcher) by heavy hitting.
knock (someone's) socks off Slang
To overwhelm or amaze.
knock some sense into Slang
To beat or hit (someone) in an effort to teach a lesson or cause a person to adopt an acceptable pattern of behavior.

[Middle English knokken, from Old English cnocian.]

knock back

vb (tr, adverb)
1. informal to drink, esp quickly
2. informal to cost
3. slang to reject or refuse: you cannot possibly knock back such an offer.
4. slang to come as an unpleasant surprise to; disconcert
n
5. slang a refusal or rejection
6. prison slang failure to obtain parole
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.knock back - cost a certain amount; "My daughter's wedding set me back $20,000"
cost, be - be priced at; "These shoes cost $100"
Translations
يَشْرَب
hælde i sig
sturta í sig
obrátiť do seba
dikmekyuvarlamak

w>knock back

vt sep (inf)
he knocked back his whiskyer kippte sich (dat)den Whisky hinter die Binde (inf); come on, knock it backnun trink schon (aus) (inf)
(= cost) this watch knocked me back £20ich habe für die Uhr £ 20 hingelegt, die Uhr hat mich £ 20 gekostet; what did they knock you back for it?was mussten Sie dafür hinlegen or blechen? (inf)
(= shock)schocken, erschüttern
(= reject)zurückweisen

knock

(nok) verb
1. to make a sharp noise by hitting or tapping, especially on a door etc to attract attention. Just then, someone knocked at the door.
2. to cause to move, especially to fall, by hitting (often accidentally). She knocked a vase on to the floor while she was dusting.
3. to put into a certain state or position by hitting. He knocked the other man senseless.
4. (often with against, ~on) to strike against or bump into. She knocked against the table and spilt his cup of coffee; I knocked my head on the car door.
noun
1. an act of knocking or striking. She gave two knocks on the door; He had a nasty bruise from a knock he had received playing football.
2. the sound made by a knock, especially on a door etc. Suddenly they heard a loud knock.
ˈknocker noun
a piece of metal etc fixed to a door and used for knocking.
ˌknock-ˈkneed adjective
having legs that curve inwards abnormally at the knee.
knock about/around
1. to treat in a rough and unkind manner, especially to hit repeatedly. I've heard that her husband knocks her about.
2. to move about (in) in a casual manner without a definite destination or purpose. He spent six months knocking around before getting a job.
3. (with with) to be friendly with. I don't like the boys he knocks about with.
knock back
to drink, especially quickly and in large quantities. He knocked back three pints of beer in ten minutes.
knock down
1. to cause to fall by striking. He was so angry with the man that he knocked him down; The old lady was knocked down by a van as she crossed the street.
2. to reduce the price of (goods). She bought a coat that had been knocked down to half-price.
knock off
to stop working. I knocked off at six o'clock after studying for four hours; What time do you knock off in this factory?
knock out
1. to make unconscious by a blow, or (in boxing) unable to recover within the required time. The boxer knocked his opponent out in the third round.
2. to defeat and cause to retire from a competition. That team knocked us out in the semi-finals (noun ˈknock-out).
knock over
to cause to fall from an upright position. The dog knocked over a chair as it rushed past.
knock up
1. (of opponents in a tennis match) to have a short practice before starting on the match (noun ˈknock-up).
2. (slang) to make a woman pregnant.
get knocked up
to get pregnant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alliance secretary Helen Rodgers said the group has been lobbying the state government for many months - were delighted by the decision to knock back the PEL application.
And Albion chairman Peace could have made himself a massive profit - but chose to knock back a pounds 4million bid from West Ham last week.
Town End residents asked Kirklees Council's Huddersfield Planning Sub-committee to knock back the plan at yesterday's meeting.