knock down


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knock

 (nŏk)
v. knocked, knock·ing, knocks
v.tr.
1. To strike with a hard blow: knocked him on the head.
2. To affect in a specified way by striking hard: knocked the mugger senseless.
3. To cause to be displaced or unengaged; force: a wind that knocked the tower over; a blunder that knocked him out of the job.
4. To cause to collide: I knocked my head on a low beam.
5. To produce by hitting or striking: knocked a hole in the wall.
6. Informal To find fault with; criticize: Don't knock the food; it's free.
v.intr.
1. To strike a sharp audible blow or series of blows, as on a door.
2. To collide with something: knocked into the table.
3. To make a pounding or clanking noise: The car engine is knocking.
n.
1. An instance of striking or colliding.
2. The sound of a sharp blow on a hard surface.
3. A pounding or clanking noise made by an engine, often as a result of faulty fuel combustion. Also called ping.
4. Slang A cutting, often petty criticism.
Phrasal Verbs:
knock around (or about) Informal
1. To be rough or brutal with; maltreat.
2. To wander from place to place: knocking around Europe.
3. To discuss or consider: met to knock around some ideas.
knock back Informal
To gulp (an alcoholic drink).
knock down
1. To bring to the ground with a blow or other forceful action; topple.
2. To disassemble into parts, as for storage or shipping.
3. To declare sold at an auction, as by striking a blow with a gavel.
4. To reduce in amount or intensity: a retailer who knocked down the price by 20 percent; firefighters who knocked down the fire enough to search the house.
5. Slang To receive as wages; earn: knocks down $50 an hour.
knock off
1. Informal
a. To take a break or rest from; stop: knocked off work at noon.
b. To cease work: It's after five; let's knock off.
2. Informal To complete, accomplish, or dispose of hastily or easily; finish: That author knocks off a book a year.
3. Informal To get rid of; eliminate: knocked off 12 pounds in a month.
4. Slang To kill or overcome.
5. Slang To hold up or rob: knocked off a bank.
6. Informal To copy or imitate, especially without permission: knocking off someone else's ideas.
knock out
1. To render unconscious.
2. Sports To defeat (a boxing opponent) by a knockout.
3. To render useless or inoperative: The storm knocked out the phones.
4. Informal To excite or overwhelm, especially by being sexually attractive.
5. Informal To exert or exhaust (oneself or another) to the utmost: knocked herself out to be ready on time.
6. Informal To produce in abundance: The workers knocked out 500 parts in one hour.
7. To inactivate (a gene or genes) by genetic manipulation so that the resulting phenotypic effects can be observed.
knock together
To make or assemble quickly or carelessly.
knock up
1. Derogatory Slang To make pregnant.
2. Chiefly British To wake up or summon, as by knocking at the door.
3. Chiefly British To wear out; exhaust.
Idioms:
have it knocked Slang
To be certain of success: "He knew he had it knocked after he saw a rough cut of Chinatown" (Time).
knock cold
To render unconscious; knock out.
knock dead
1. To kill with a blow.
2. Slang To affect strongly and positively: a performance that knocked the audience dead.
knock it off Slang
To stop doing something. Often used in the imperative: He asked us to knock it off.
knock out of the box Baseball
To force the removal of (an opposing pitcher) by heavy hitting.
knock (someone's) socks off Slang
To overwhelm or amaze.
knock some sense into Slang
To beat or hit (someone) in an effort to teach a lesson or cause a person to adopt an acceptable pattern of behavior.

[Middle English knokken, from Old English cnocian.]

knock down

vb (tr, adverb)
1. to strike to the ground with a blow, as in boxing
2. (Commerce) (in auctions) to declare (an article) sold, as by striking a blow with a gavel
3. to demolish
4. to dismantle, for ease of transport
5. informal to reduce (a price, etc)
6. slang Austral to spend (a cheque)
7. slang Austral to drink
adj (prenominal)
8. overwhelming; powerful: a knockdown blow.
9. chiefly Brit cheap: I got the table at a knockdown price.
10. easily dismantled: knockdown furniture.
n
slang US and Austral an introduction: will you give me a knockdown to her?.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.knock down - cause to come or go down; "The policeman downed the heavily armed suspect"; "The mugger knocked down the old lady after she refused to hand over her wallet"
submarine - bring down with a blow to the legs
strike - deliver a sharp blow, as with the hand, fist, or weapon; "The teacher struck the child"; "the opponent refused to strike"; "The boxer struck the attacker dead"
2.knock down - knock down with force; "He decked his opponent"
beat - hit repeatedly; "beat on the door"; "beat the table with his shoe"
3.knock down - shatter as if by explosion
dash, smash - break into pieces, as by striking or knocking over; "Smash a plate"

knock

verb
1. To deliver a powerful blow to suddenly and sharply:
Informal: biff, bop, clip, wallop.
Slang: belt, conk, paste.
Idioms: let someone have it, sock it to someone.
2. To make a noise by striking:
3. Slang. To find fault with:
Informal: cut up, pan.
phrasal verb
knock about or around
1. To be rough or brutal with:
Slang: mess up.
2. To injure or damage, as by abuse or heavy wear:
3. Informal. To speak together and exchange ideas and opinions about:
bandy (about), discuss, moot, talk over, thrash out (or over), thresh out (or over), toss around.
Informal: hash (over), kick around.
Slang: rap.
phrasal verb
knock down
1. To cause to fall, as from a shot or blow:
Slang: deck.
Idiom: lay low.
2. To pull down or break up so that reconstruction is impossible:
Aerospace: destruct.
phrasal verb
knock off
1. Informal. To take away (a quantity) from another quantity:
2. Slang. To take the life of (a person or persons) unlawfully:
Informal: put away.
3. Slang. To take property or possessions from (a person or company, for example) unlawfully and usually forcibly:
Slang: heist.
phrasal verb
knock out
1. To render powerless or motionless, as by inflicting severe injury:
Idiom: put out of action.
2. Informal. To make extremely tired:
Informal: tucker (out).
Slang: do in, poop (out).
Idioms: run ragged, take it out of.
phrasal verb
knock over
To turn or cause to turn from a vertical or horizontal position:
noun
1. The sound made by a light blow:
2. Slang. A comment expressing fault:
Informal: pan.
Translations
يُخَفِّض الأسْعاريَصْرَع، يُلقي أرضاًيُهَدِّمُ
strhnout
køre overnedsætteslå ned
iskeä maahan
srušiti
leszorít
lækkaîur í verîislá/keyra niîur
打ち倒す
때려 부수다
zlacnieťzraziť na zem
slå ner
ทุบทิ้ง
phá hủy

w>knock down

vt sep
person, thingumwerfen, zu Boden werfen; opponent (by hitting) → niederschlagen; (car, driver)anfahren; (completely) → umfahren; (fatally) → überfahren; buildingabreißen, niederreißen; treefällen, umhauen; dooreinschlagen; obstacle, fenceniederreißen; she was knocked down and killedsie wurde überfahren; he knocked him down with one blower schlug or streckte (geh)ihn mit einem Schlag zu Boden
price (buyer)herunterhandeln (→ to auf +acc); (seller)heruntergehen mit; I managed to knock him down a poundich konnte ein Pfund herunterhandeln; I knocked him down to £15ich habe es auf £ 15 heruntergehandelt; he knocked the price down by £5 for meer hat mir £ 5 nachgelassen
(at auction) → zuschlagen (to sb jdm); to be knocked down at £1für ein Pfund versteigert werden
machine, furniturezerlegen, auseinandernehmen

knock

(nok) verb
1. to make a sharp noise by hitting or tapping, especially on a door etc to attract attention. Just then, someone knocked at the door.
2. to cause to move, especially to fall, by hitting (often accidentally). She knocked a vase on to the floor while she was dusting.
3. to put into a certain state or position by hitting. He knocked the other man senseless.
4. (often with against, ~on) to strike against or bump into. She knocked against the table and spilt his cup of coffee; I knocked my head on the car door.
noun
1. an act of knocking or striking. She gave two knocks on the door; He had a nasty bruise from a knock he had received playing football.
2. the sound made by a knock, especially on a door etc. Suddenly they heard a loud knock.
ˈknocker noun
a piece of metal etc fixed to a door and used for knocking.
ˌknock-ˈkneed adjective
having legs that curve inwards abnormally at the knee.
knock about/around
1. to treat in a rough and unkind manner, especially to hit repeatedly. I've heard that her husband knocks her about.
2. to move about (in) in a casual manner without a definite destination or purpose. He spent six months knocking around before getting a job.
3. (with with) to be friendly with. I don't like the boys he knocks about with.
knock back
to drink, especially quickly and in large quantities. He knocked back three pints of beer in ten minutes.
knock down
1. to cause to fall by striking. He was so angry with the man that he knocked him down; The old lady was knocked down by a van as she crossed the street.
2. to reduce the price of (goods). She bought a coat that had been knocked down to half-price.
knock off
to stop working. I knocked off at six o'clock after studying for four hours; What time do you knock off in this factory?
knock out
1. to make unconscious by a blow, or (in boxing) unable to recover within the required time. The boxer knocked his opponent out in the third round.
2. to defeat and cause to retire from a competition. That team knocked us out in the semi-finals (noun ˈknock-out).
knock over
to cause to fall from an upright position. The dog knocked over a chair as it rushed past.
knock up
1. (of opponents in a tennis match) to have a short practice before starting on the match (noun ˈknock-up).
2. (slang) to make a woman pregnant.
get knocked up
to get pregnant.

knock down

يُهَدِّمُ strhnout slå ned niederschlagen ρίχνω κάτω με ένα χτύπημα derribar iskeä maahan renverser srušiti abbattere 打ち倒す 때려 부수다 neerhalen slå ned wywrócić derrubar, derrubar com uma pancada сносить slå ner ทุบทิ้ง devirmek phá hủy 击倒
References in classic literature ?
I will put that poor little boy on the top of the tree, and then I will knock down the wall, and my garden shall be the children's playground for ever and ever.
So I started on my hands and knees, because I could go faster that way, and with more confidence, too, and not knock down things.
Eight foot and a half, and 'twill knock down a calf"--here he made it whistle in the air--"and I hope it will knock down you.
I want the damages at a thousand, but he says that for so simple a knock down we can't lay them at more than five hundred.
The case was plain, but it seemed preposterous, nevertheless--as preposterous as trying to knock down a mountain or wipe out a continent.
My staff is long enough to knock down a calf; so look to thyself, fellow, I say again.
So that he can knock down bullocks, as he used formerly.