knocking


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knock

 (nŏk)
v. knocked, knock·ing, knocks
v.tr.
1. To strike with a hard blow: knocked him on the head.
2. To affect in a specified way by striking hard: knocked the mugger senseless.
3. To cause to be displaced or unengaged; force: a wind that knocked the tower over; a blunder that knocked him out of the job.
4. To cause to collide: I knocked my head on a low beam.
5. To produce by hitting or striking: knocked a hole in the wall.
6. Informal To find fault with; criticize: Don't knock the food; it's free.
v.intr.
1. To strike a sharp audible blow or series of blows, as on a door.
2. To collide with something: knocked into the table.
3. To make a pounding or clanking noise: The car engine is knocking.
n.
1. An instance of striking or colliding.
2. The sound of a sharp blow on a hard surface.
3. A pounding or clanking noise made by an engine, often as a result of faulty fuel combustion. Also called ping.
4. Slang A cutting, often petty criticism.
Phrasal Verbs:
knock around (or about) Informal
1. To be rough or brutal with; maltreat.
2. To wander from place to place: knocking around Europe.
3. To discuss or consider: met to knock around some ideas.
knock back Informal
To gulp (an alcoholic drink).
knock down
1. To bring to the ground with a blow or other forceful action; topple.
2. To disassemble into parts, as for storage or shipping.
3. To declare sold at an auction, as by striking a blow with a gavel.
4. To reduce in amount or intensity: a retailer who knocked down the price by 20 percent; firefighters who knocked down the fire enough to search the house.
5. Slang To receive as wages; earn: knocks down $50 an hour.
knock off
1. Informal
a. To take a break or rest from; stop: knocked off work at noon.
b. To cease work: It's after five; let's knock off.
2. Informal To complete, accomplish, or dispose of hastily or easily; finish: That author knocks off a book a year.
3. Informal To get rid of; eliminate: knocked off 12 pounds in a month.
4. Slang To kill or overcome.
5. Slang To hold up or rob: knocked off a bank.
6. Informal To copy or imitate, especially without permission: knocking off someone else's ideas.
knock out
1. To render unconscious.
2. Sports To defeat (a boxing opponent) by a knockout.
3. To render useless or inoperative: The storm knocked out the phones.
4. Informal To excite or overwhelm, especially by being sexually attractive.
5. Informal To exert or exhaust (oneself or another) to the utmost: knocked herself out to be ready on time.
6. Informal To produce in abundance: The workers knocked out 500 parts in one hour.
7. To inactivate (a gene or genes) by genetic manipulation so that the resulting phenotypic effects can be observed.
knock together
To make or assemble quickly or carelessly.
knock up
1. Derogatory Slang To make pregnant.
2. Chiefly British To wake up or summon, as by knocking at the door.
3. Chiefly British To wear out; exhaust.
Idioms:
have it knocked Slang
To be certain of success: "He knew he had it knocked after he saw a rough cut of Chinatown" (Time).
knock cold
To render unconscious; knock out.
knock dead
1. To kill with a blow.
2. Slang To affect strongly and positively: a performance that knocked the audience dead.
knock it off Slang
To stop doing something. Often used in the imperative: He asked us to knock it off.
knock out of the box Baseball
To force the removal of (an opposing pitcher) by heavy hitting.
knock (someone's) socks off Slang
To overwhelm or amaze.
knock some sense into Slang
To beat or hit (someone) in an effort to teach a lesson or cause a person to adopt an acceptable pattern of behavior.

[Middle English knokken, from Old English cnocian.]

knocking

(ˈnɒkɪŋ)
n
sharp rapping with the knuckles, a hard object, etc, esp to capture attentionthe sound that an engine or bearing makes as a result of wear or faulty combustion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knocking - the sound of knocking (as on a door or in an engine or bearing)knocking - the sound of knocking (as on a door or in an engine or bearing); "the knocking grew louder"
sound - the sudden occurrence of an audible event; "the sound awakened them"
Translations

knocking

[ˈnɒkɪŋ]
A. N (= sound) → golpes mpl, golpeteo m; (at door) → golpe m, llamada f (Aut) → golpeteo m
B. CPD knocking copy Ncontrapublicidad f anuncio destinado a denigrar el producto de otro

knocking

[ˈnɒkɪŋ] n (= sound) → coups mpl
there was loud knocking → on entendit frapper bruyamment, on entendit des coups bruyantsknocking-off time nheure f de la sortieknock-kneed [ˌnɒkˈniːd] adj [person] → aux genoux cagneux
to be knock-kneed → avoir les genoux cagneuxknock-on effect nretombées fpl
to have a knock-on effect on sth → avoir des retombées sur qch

knocking

n
Klopfen nt, → Pochen nt (liter); (in engine) → Klopfen nt
(inf)Kritik f (→ of an +dat); he has taken a knockinger ist unter Beschuss gekommen

knocking

:
knocking copy
n (in advertising) → Negativwerbung f
knocking-off time
n (inf)Feierabend m
knocking-shop
n (Brit inf) → Puff m (inf)

knocking

[ˈnɒkɪŋ] ncolpi mpl
References in classic literature ?
One Evening in December as my Father, my Mother and myself, were arranged in social converse round our Fireside, we were on a sudden greatly astonished, by hearing a violent knocking on the outward door of our rustic Cot.
I am certain there is somebody knocking at the Door.
Daniel Quilp of Tower Hill, and Sampson Brass of Bevis Marks in the city of London, Gentleman, one of her Majesty's attornies of the Courts of the King's Bench and Common Pleas at Westminster and a solicitor of the High Court of Chancery, slumbered on, unconscious and unsuspicious of any mischance, until a knocking on the street door, often repeated and gradually mounting up from a modest single rap to a perfect battery of knocks, fired in long discharges with a very short interval between, caused the said Daniel Quilp to struggle into a horizontal position, and to stare at the ceiling with a drowsy indifference, betokening that he heard the noise and rather wondered at the same, and couldn't be at the trouble of bestowing any further thought upon the subject.
As the knocking, however, instead of accommodating itself to his lazy state, increased in vigour and became more importunate, as if in earnest remonstrance against his falling asleep again, now that he had once opened his eyes, Daniel Quilp began by degrees to comprehend the possibility of there being somebody at the door; and thus he gradually came to recollect that it was Friday morning, and he had ordered Mrs Quilp to be in waiting upon him at an early hour.
There were three distinct stages in the evolution of Annette Brougham's attitude towards the knocking in the room above.
I live in the room below, and I heard you knocking.
But the cart pressed down colder and colder, and then he heard a strange knocking, awoke completely, and remembered everything.
As knocking was of no use, Pinocchio, in despair, began to kick and bang against the door, as if he wanted to break it.
Instead of lying down, he kept jerking his halter rope up and down through the ring, and knocking the block about against the manger till I could not sleep.
In this short interval the knocking came again, and a voice close to the window--a voice the locksmith seemed to recollect, and to have some disagreeable association with--whispered 'Make haste.
Mauki did not know what seven bells were, but they occurred in beche-de-mer, and he imagined them to be the blood and teeth that sometimes accompanied the process of knocking out seven bells.
Bishopriggs, "that I wadna come in without knocking first.