knoll


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knoll 1

 (nōl)
n.
A small rounded hill or mound; a hillock.

[Middle English knol, from Old English cnoll.]

knoll 2

 (nōl) Archaic
v. knolled, knoll·ing, knolls
v.intr.
To ring mournfully; knell.
v.tr.
To ring or sound (a bell, for example) mournfully; knell.
n.
A knell.

[Middle English knollen, probably alteration of knellen, to knell; see knell.]

knoll

(nəʊl)
n
(Physical Geography) a small rounded hill
[Old English cnoll; compare Old Norse knollr hilltop]
ˈknolly adj

knoll

(nəʊl)
n, vb
an archaic or dialect word for knell
ˈknoller n

knoll1

(noʊl)

n.
a small, rounded hill or mound.
[before 900; Middle English cnol, Old English cnoll, c. Middle Dutch, Middle High German knolle clod, Old Norse knollr summit]
knoll′y, adj.

knoll2

(noʊl)
Archaic. v.t.
1. to ring or toll a bell for; announce by tolling.
2. to ring or toll (a bell).
v.i.
3. to sound, as a bell; ring.
4. to sound a knell.
n.
5. a stroke of a bell in ringing or tolling.
[1350–1400; Middle English (n. and v.); alter. of knell]
knoll′er, n.

knoll

- The summit or rounded top of a mountain or hill, it seems to derive from Old Teutonic knoo-lo, meaning "ball, clod, knot."
See also related terms for summit.

knoll


Past participle: knolled
Gerund: knolling

Imperative
knoll
knoll
Present
I knoll
you knoll
he/she/it knolls
we knoll
you knoll
they knoll
Preterite
I knolled
you knolled
he/she/it knolled
we knolled
you knolled
they knolled
Present Continuous
I am knolling
you are knolling
he/she/it is knolling
we are knolling
you are knolling
they are knolling
Present Perfect
I have knolled
you have knolled
he/she/it has knolled
we have knolled
you have knolled
they have knolled
Past Continuous
I was knolling
you were knolling
he/she/it was knolling
we were knolling
you were knolling
they were knolling
Past Perfect
I had knolled
you had knolled
he/she/it had knolled
we had knolled
you had knolled
they had knolled
Future
I will knoll
you will knoll
he/she/it will knoll
we will knoll
you will knoll
they will knoll
Future Perfect
I will have knolled
you will have knolled
he/she/it will have knolled
we will have knolled
you will have knolled
they will have knolled
Future Continuous
I will be knolling
you will be knolling
he/she/it will be knolling
we will be knolling
you will be knolling
they will be knolling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been knolling
you have been knolling
he/she/it has been knolling
we have been knolling
you have been knolling
they have been knolling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been knolling
you will have been knolling
he/she/it will have been knolling
we will have been knolling
you will have been knolling
they will have been knolling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been knolling
you had been knolling
he/she/it had been knolling
we had been knolling
you had been knolling
they had been knolling
Conditional
I would knoll
you would knoll
he/she/it would knoll
we would knoll
you would knoll
they would knoll
Past Conditional
I would have knolled
you would have knolled
he/she/it would have knolled
we would have knolled
you would have knolled
they would have knolled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knoll - a small natural hillknoll - a small natural hill      
anthill, formicary - a mound of earth made by ants as they dig their nest
hill - a local and well-defined elevation of the land; "they loved to roam the hills of West Virginia"
kopje, koppie - a small hill rising up from the African veld
molehill - a mound of earth made by moles while burrowing

knoll

hillock
noun hill, swell, mound, barrow, hummock a grassy knoll
Translations
kumpare

knoll

[nəʊl] Notero m, montículo m

knoll

nHügel m, → Kuppe f

knoll

[nəʊl] npoggio
References in classic literature ?
The place which had been chosen for the grave of Cora was a little knoll, where a cluster of young and healthful pines had taken root, forming of themselves a melancholy and appropriate shade over the spot.
It stands on a knoll, surrounded by locust, trees and lofty elms, from among which its decent, whitewashed walls shine modestly forth, like Christian purity beaming through the shades of retirement.
Beyond the boundaries of the plantation, George had noticed a dry, sandy knoll, shaded by a few trees; there they made the grave.
A little hamlet, whose roofs were blent with trees, straggled up the side of one of these hills; the church of the district stood nearer Thornfield: its old tower-top looked over a knoll between the house and gates.
How often, at hare and hounds, have I seen him mounted on a little knoll, cheering the whole field on to action, and waving his hat above his grey head, oblivious of King Charles the Martyr's head, and all belonging to it
Then while the whole glade was filled with the savory smell of roasting venison and fat capons, and brown pasties warmed beside the blaze, and mulled wine sent forth a cordial fragrance, Robin Hood placed the Sheriff upon a knoll beneath the largest oak and sat himself down by him.
A few lofty Scotch firs grew hard by upon a knoll; a clear fountain near the foot of the knoll sent up a miniature streamlet which meandered in the heather.
Then I shifted my position to a little knoll that gave me the advantage of a yard or more of eleva- tion and when I looked for him presently he was walking towards Woking.
I was sitting one evening upon a knoll that overlooked the meadow where the horses were pastured.
Sometimes he declared it must have been at the foot of a mulberry tree hard by; then beside a great white stone; then under a small green knoll, a short distance from the ledge of rocks, until at length Wolfert became as bewildered as himself.
It was the very thing of all others to be wished, it was the best, it was the only way of proceeding with any advantage, in Henry Crawford's opinion; and he directly saw a knoll not half a mile off, which would give them exactly the requisite command of the house.
The opposite, or northern side, is Cape Disappointment; a kind of peninsula, terminating in a steep knoll or promontory crowned with a forest of pine-trees, and connected with the mainland by a low and narrow neck.