knop

(redirected from knops)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.
Related to knops: Knobs

knop

 (nŏp)
n.
A small decorative knob or boss.

[Middle English knop, knoppe, from Old English cnop.]

knop

(nɒp)
n
archaic a knob, esp an ornamental one
[C14: from Germanic; compare Middle Dutch cnoppe bud, Old High German knopf]

knop

(nɒp)

n.
a small knob or similar rounded protuberance, esp. for ornament.
[1325–75; Middle English; Old English cnop; c. Dutch knop, German Knopf]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) is not an agreement between Iran and the United States, rather it is a deal between six countries representing the international community; we must not allow one country to take full control of the fate of the agreement," Boroujerdi said in a meeting with Dutch parliamentarian Raymond Knops in Tehran on Saturday.
It is estimated at PS4,000 to PS6,000, while a group of Malacca canes dating from the late 17th and early 18th centuries with pique-decorated ivory knops have estimates ranging from PS2,000 to PS4,500.
Knops, a University of Nebraska-Lincoln biologist and one of the paper's international co-authors, said.
Joseph Medical Center, Kiwanis Club of Bellingham, Northwest Eye Clinic, IMCO General Construction, Pepper Sisters, The Franklin Corporation, CH2MHILL, Richard and Ann Van Kolken, Deborah Loober and Gail and Joost Knops.
3 Sixteen-year-old Wisconsin hunter Kyle Knops killed this 184-inch Dunn County nontypical on Oct.
Various polymorphic forms of CR1, including molecular weight polymorphism, red blood cell expression levels /density polymorphism and Knops (KN) polymorphism are known.
Although not required, most of Knops "test" students had some calculus background.
Rochelle Knops, 3M marketing administrator, said commercial buildings are the most frequent targets--especially those in visible areas where all can view the taggers' work.
Figural knops, such as the lion sejant (seated) and maidenheads (images of the Virgin Mary) were very popular during the late 16th and early 17th centuries.
In the research, UNL biologist Johannes Knops has demonstrated how one invasive plant species replaces native species because of its ability to take up and hold on to nitrogen.
Final proof that this candlestick is, in fact, modern is provided by the absence of wear on the ridges of the knops, which are actually quite sharp.