knothole


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knot·hole

 (nŏt′hōl′)
n.
A hole in a piece of lumber where a knot has dropped out or been removed.

knothole

(ˈnɒtˌhəʊl)
n
a hole in a piece of wood where a knot has been

knot•hole

(ˈnɒtˌhoʊl)

n.
a hole in a board or plank formed by the falling out of a knot or a portion of a knot.
[1720–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knothole - a hole in a board where a knot came out
hole - an opening into or through something
plank, board - a stout length of sawn timber; made in a wide variety of sizes and used for many purposes
Translations

knothole

[ˈnɒthəʊl] Nagujero m (que deja un nudo en la madera)

knothole

n (in timber) → Astloch nt
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
It was all the fault of the knothole," protested Phil.
It was a good thing the knothole was there," said Aunt Jamesina rather severely.
At these words the Cobbler's eyes opened big and wide, and his mouth grew round with wonder, like a knothole in a board fence.
He'd known her cousin, Chris, since they were kids in Knothole baseball.
Then he won fame in television's infancy as the creator and host of Happy Felton's Knothole (or, Knot-Hole) Gang-a kiddie-oriented television program broadcast live from Ebbets Field.
Louis," Sievers continued, "and I used to sit with the Knothole Gang in left field at Sportsman's Park and watch Medwick.
the back of the Backyard I talk to his voice Through a knothole A funny
Junie James was to my left and spotted him climbing into a knothole.
If any part of you is visible through a crack in a door, a knothole, whatever; if there's even a change in light through that slice, that hole, somebody can put rounds on you.
At home, I used sandstone from local sources for walkways and created a birdhouse from a knothole in my old tobacco shed.
To put this in concrete terms, consider a 2008-10 suite of fifteen panels, also on view here, that picture every knothole in the wooden architecture of her upstate home; together, the set partakes equally of Robert Mangold's serial rigor and Sylvia Plimack Mangold's domestic interiors.