knout


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knout

 (nout)
n.
A leather scourge used for flogging.
tr.v. knout·ed, knout·ing, knouts
To flog with a knout.

[French, from Russian knut, from Old Russian knutŭ, from Old Norse knūtr, knot in cord.]

knout

(naʊt)
n
a stout whip used formerly in Russia as an instrument of punishment
[C17: from Russian knut, of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse knūtr knot]

knout

(naʊt)
n.
1. a whip with a lash of leather thongs, formerly used in Russia for flogging criminals.
v.t.
2. to flog with the knout.
[1710–20; < French < Russian knut, Old Russian]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knout - a whip with a lash of leather thongs twisted with wire; used for flogging prisoners
whip - an instrument with a handle and a flexible lash that is used for whipping
Translations

knout

[naʊt] Nknut m

knout

nKnute f
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
I believe that he keeps a little private knout at home for his wife and children.
Pott's door, which door itself opened, and displayed the great Pott accoutred as a Russian officer of justice, with a tremendous knout in his hand--tastefully typical of the stern and mighty power of the Eatanswill GAZETTE, and the fearful lashings it bestowed on public offenders.
Torture in a public school is as much licensed as the knout in Russia.
These young fellows nowadays want someone standing over them with a knout all the time.
The drivers disputed as to whose troyka should go ahead, and the youngest, seating himself sideways with a dashing air, swung his long knout and shouted to the horses.
57) The suspects were tortured several times a day, and at times, the number of blows with the knout exceeded the norms in the Petrine era, which for peasants consisted of 15 to 35-40 blows at a time.
Is it the Russian State, to whom the knout, the gibbet, and Siberia are the sole means of persuasion?
The idea of the barbaric Tartar whip and Czarist knout in The Secret Agent and Under Western Eyes (1911) recurs in The Magic Mountain (1924) when the liberal Settembrini, referring to the notorious prison in St.
Wolves of the steppes, snow, vodka, the knout, Shlusselburg, Holy Russia.
98) In 1856 Westgarth relished the thought that 'Holy Willie's Prayer', 'The Address to the Unco Guid' and 'The Holy Fair' had descended on religious hypocrites like a 'Russian knout wielded by a practised hand'.
For shoppers who are not familiar with the store's knout, die pet section is clearly delineated with a bright.
You might even knout a little bit about them, which makes the vetting process easier.