knowing


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know·ing

 (nō′ĭng)
adj.
1. Possessing knowledge, information, or understanding: very knowing about transportation costs.
2. Showing clever awareness and resourcefulness; shrewd and worldly: "Even so knowing a young ruffian as William Chaloner would have had no preparation for the shock of London" (Thomas Levenson).
3. Suggestive of secret or private knowledge: a knowing glance.
4. Deliberate; conscious: a knowing attempt to defraud.
5. Archaic Fashionable; stylish: "Many young men ... drove about town in very knowing gigs" (Jane Austen).

know′ing·ly adv.
know′ing·ness n.

knowing

(ˈnəʊɪŋ)
adj
1. suggesting secret information or knowledge
2. wise, shrewd, or clever
3. deliberate; intentional
n
there is no knowing one cannot tell
ˈknowingly adv
ˈknowingness n

know•ing

(ˈnoʊ ɪŋ)

adj.
1. affecting or revealing shrewd knowledge of secret or private information: a knowing glance.
2. having knowledge or information; intelligent.
3. shrewd, sharp, or astute.
4. conscious; intentional; deliberate.
[1325–75]
know′ing•ly, adv.
know′ing•ness, n.

knowing

  • gnostic - Means "relating to knowledge" or "clever, knowing."
  • polyglot - Meaning "written in or knowing many languages," it is from Greek polu-, "many," and glotto, "tongue."
  • savoir vivre - Literally, "knowing how to live" or knowing how to get the most out of life.
  • scibility - The power of knowing.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knowing - a clear and certain mental apprehension
awareness, cognisance, cognizance, knowingness, consciousness - having knowledge of; "he had no awareness of his mistakes"; "his sudden consciousness of the problem he faced"; "their intelligence and general knowingness was impressive"
incognizance - a lack of knowledge or recognition
higher cognitive process - cognitive processes that presuppose the availability of knowledge and put it to use
know - the fact of being aware of information that is known to few people; "he is always in the know"
ken, cognizance - range of what one can know or understand; "beyond my ken"
prospicience, foresight, prevision, farsightedness - seeing ahead; knowing in advance; foreseeing
discernment, savvy, understanding, apprehension - the cognitive condition of someone who understands; "he has virtually no understanding of social cause and effect"
Adj.1.knowing - evidencing the possession of inside information
informed - having much knowledge or education; "an informed public"; "informed opinion"; "the informed customer"
2.knowing - characterized by conscious design or purpose; "intentional damage"; "a knowing attempt to defraud"; "a willful waste of time"
intended - resulting from one's intentions; "your intended trip abroad"; "an intended insult"
3.knowing - alert and fully informed; "a knowing collector of rare books"; "surprisingly knowledgeable about what was going on"
informed - having much knowledge or education; "an informed public"; "informed opinion"; "the informed customer"
4.knowing - highly educated; having extensive information or understanding; "knowing instructors"; "a knowledgeable critic"; "a knowledgeable audience"
educated - possessing an education (especially having more than average knowledge)

knowing

adjective meaningful, significant, expressive, eloquent, enigmatic, suggestive Ron gave her a knowing smile.

knowing

adjective
1. Having or showing intelligence, often of a high order:
Informal: brainy.
2. Possessing or showing sound judgment and keen perception:
3. Having or showing a clever awareness and resourcefulness in practical matters:
Informal: savvy.
Translations
عارِف، عالِم بالسِّر
sigende
bennfentes
íbygginnómögulegt
bildiğini gösterenbilen

knowing

[ˈnəʊɪŋ]
A. ADJ (= sharp) → astuto, sagaz; [look, smile] → de complicidad
B. N there's no knowingno hay modo de saberlo
there's no knowing what he'll does imposible adivinar lo que hará

knowing

[ˈnəʊɪŋ] adj [look, smile] → entendu(e)

knowing

adj look, smilewissend; personverständnisvoll

knowing

[ˈnəʊɪŋ] adj (look, smile) → d'intesa; (shrewd) → scaltro/a

know

(nəu) past tense knew (njuː) : past participle known verb
1. to be aware of or to have been informed about. He knows everything; I know he is at home because his car is in the drive; He knows all about it; I know of no reason why you cannot go.
2. to have learned and to remember. He knows a lot of poetry.
3. to be aware of the identity of; to be friendly with. I know Mrs Smith – she lives near me.
4. to (be able to) recognize or identify. You would hardly know her now – she has become very thin; He knows a good car when he sees one.
ˈknowing adjective
showing secret understanding. She gave him a knowing look.
ˈknowingly adverb
1. in a knowing manner. She smiled knowingly.
2. deliberately or on purpose. He would not knowingly insult her.
ˈknow-all noun
an unkind name for a person who thinks he knows everything.
ˈknow-how noun
the practical knowledge and skill to deal with something. She has acquired a lot of know-how about cars.
in the know
having information possessed only by a small group of people. People in the know tell me that she is the most likely person to get the job.
know backwards
to know extremely well or perfectly. He knows his history backwards.
know better
to be too wise or well-taught (to do something). She should know better at her age!; He should have known better than to trust them.
know how to
to have learned the way to. She already knew how to read when she went to school.
know the ropes
to understand the detail and procedure of a job etc.
References in classic literature ?
I waited in that inner room -- knowing my own violent temper, and not trusting myself to see you, after what I had heard -- I waited in that inner room, trembling lest the servant should tell you of my visit before I could find an opportunity of leaving the house.
He did not so consider himself, but he could not help knowing that he had more intellect than his wife and Agafea Mihalovna, and he could not help knowing that when he thought of death, he thought with all the force of his intellect.
On getting back from the sick-room to their own two rooms for the night, Levin sat with hanging head not knowing what to do.
He knew, without thinking about it, without knowing that he knew, why Biddy, the wise as well as the brave, did not act upon all the message that her heart voiced to him, and spring into the water and swim after him.
A woman should not undertake to nurse a tender little child without knowing what is good and what is bad for it.
I would not hinder Casaubon; I said so at once; for there is no knowing how anything may turn out.
If you came without knowing why, I suppose you love her very much indeed
But after knowing you even for this short time, I knew you were quite the opposite of that, and I remembered that the first thing you had done on coming into the money had been to offer me half, so the information that you were the Lord Dawlish whom I had been hating did not affect me.
The woman that was with me had told me that by a mere accident, knowing nothing of what importance it was to me.
Knowing all this,--and still always going on with infinite endurance, pains, and perseverance, could his dark soul doubt whither he went?
I have said virtue, wealth, and generosity, because a great man who is vicious will be a great example of vice, and a rich man who is not generous will be merely a miserly beggar; for the possessor of wealth is not made happy by possessing it, but by spending it, and not by spending as he pleases, but by knowing how to spend it well.
She in the overflowing spirits of her recovery, repeats it all to her nurse; and the nurse knowing my acquaintance with you, very naturally brings it all to me.