labial


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Related to labial: labial swelling, labial surface

la·bi·al

 (lā′bē-əl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the lips or labia.
2. Linguistics Articulated mainly by closing or partly closing the lips, as the sounds (b), (m), or (w).
n.
1. Linguistics A labial consonant.
2. Music See flue1.

[Medieval Latin labiālis, from Latin labium, lip; see leb- in Indo-European roots.]

la′bi·al·ly adv.

labial

(ˈleɪbɪəl)
adj
1. (Anatomy) of, relating to, or near lips or labia
2. (Music, other) music producing sounds by the action of an air stream over a narrow liplike fissure, as in a flue pipe of an organ
3. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics relating to a speech sound whose articulation involves movement or use of the lips: a labial click.
n
4. (Music, other) music Also called: labial pipe an organ pipe with a liplike fissure
5. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics a speech sound such as English p or m, whose articulation involves movement or use of the lips
[C16: from Medieval Latin labiālis, from Latin labium lip]
ˌlabiˈality n
ˈlabially adv

la•bi•al

(ˈleɪ bi əl)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or resembling a labium.
2. of or pertaining to the lips.
3. (of a speech sound) articulated using one or both lips, as the sounds (p), (v), (m), (w), or (o̅o̅).
n.
4. a labial speech sound, esp. a consonant.
[1585–95; < Medieval Latin]
la`bi•al′i•ty, n.
la′bi•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.labial - a consonant whose articulation involves movement of the lips
consonant - a speech sound that is not a vowel
bilabial - a consonant that is articulated using both lips; /p/ or /b/ or /w/
labial stop - a stop consonant that is produced with the lips
Adj.1.labial - of or relating to the lips of the mouth; "labial stops"
2.labial - relating to or near the female labium
Translations
labijalusnenik

labial

[ˈleɪbɪəl]
A. ADJlabial
B. Nlabial f

labial

adj (Anat, Phon) → labial, Lippen-; labial soundLabial- or Lippenlaut
n (Phon) → Labial- or Lippenlaut m

la·bi·al

a. labial, rel. a los labios;
___ branches of mental nerveramas labiales del nervio mentoniano;
___ glandsglándulas labiales;
___ herniahernia ___;
___ occlusionoclusión ___;
___ splintférula ___;
___ veinsvenas labiales.

labial

adj labial
References in classic literature ?
From two to five o'clock a species of labial telegraphy went on throughout the town; and all the inhabitants learned that Mademoiselle Cormon had at last found a husband by letter, and was about to marry the Vicomte de Troisville.
The labial melody with which the Typee girls carry on an ordinary conversation, giving a musical prolongation to the final syllable of every sentence, and chirping out some of the words with a liquid, bird-like accent, was singularly pleasing.
The labial face is weakly convex with coarse longitudinal striations restricted to the crown foot.
Labial salivary gland biopsies were performed as described[31,32] with the removal of 5 to 6 glands from all patients.
The VV, or common wart, is classically described as a white, firm, exophytic lesion with a stippled or papillary surface, and is found most commonly on the labial mucosa and vermilion border of the lips.
Martello said the surgery was challenging because she had to locate and then reconnect incredibly small portions of the labial artery - both in the face and in the severed lip.
When classifying lip prints, experts divide distinguishing labial wrinkles and grooves of the lips into two categories--simple and compound.
One study found more perineal tears in a "chair group" while another showed fewer perineal but more labial tears.
BioAlliance Pharma SA (Euronext Paris - BIO) (Paris:BIO), an innovative Company dedicated to the development of orphan oncology products and to supportive care products, announces the approval of Sitavig([R]) (acyclovir Lauriad(TM)) for the treatment of recurrent labial herpes in 8 European countries*.
Head, thorax and collar white; antenna brown, bipectinate; labial palpus white with light brown at base.
Suzi Leather, chair of the RCOG's Ethics Committee, said: "The Ethics Committee at the RCOG is concerned about the recent increase in labial reduction procedures, fuelled in part by the mass media and inaccurate advertising.
The group is diagnosed by the truncate third labial segment, the similar wing venation, the absence of a pronotal collar, and the distinct hyperpleural lobes (as defined by Emsley, 1969).