laboring


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la·bor

 (lā′bər)
n.
1. Physical or mental exertion, especially when difficult or exhausting; work. See Synonyms at work.
2. A specific task or effort, especially a painful or arduous one: "Eating the bread was a labor I put myself through to quiet my stomach" (Gail Anderson-Dargatz).
3. A particular form of work or method of working: manual labor.
4. Work for wages: businesses paying more for labor.
5.
a. Workers considered as a group.
b. The trade union movement, especially its officials.
6. Labor A political party representing workers' interests, especially in Great Britain.
7. The process by which childbirth occurs, beginning with contractions of the uterus and ending with the expulsion of the fetus or infant and the placenta.
v. la·bored, la·bor·ing, la·bors
v.intr.
1. To work; toil: labored in the fields.
2. To strive painstakingly: labored over the needlepoint.
3.
a. To proceed with great effort; plod: labored up the hill.
b. Nautical To pitch and roll.
4. To suffer from distress or a disadvantage: labored under the misconception that others were cooperating.
5. To undergo the labor of childbirth.
v.tr.
1. To deal with in exhaustive or excessive detail; belabor: labor a point in the argument.
2. To distress; burden: I will not labor you with trivial matters.
adj.
1. Of or relating to labor.
2. Labor Of or relating to a Labor Party.

[Middle English, from Old French labour, from Latin labor.]

la′bor·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.laboring - doing arduous or unpleasant worklaboring - doing arduous or unpleasant work; "drudging peasants"; "the bent backs of laboring slaves picking cotton"; "toiling coal miners in the black deeps"
busy - actively or fully engaged or occupied; "busy with her work"; "a busy man"; "too busy to eat lunch"
References in classic literature ?
John Brooke', and evidently laboring under the delusion that the whole affair had been brought about by his excellent management.
The sticks were removed, and the stones lifted; for Indian cunning was known frequently to adopt these objects as covers, laboring with the utmost patience and industry, to conceal each footstep as they proceeded.
They were generally poverty-stricken; always plebeian and obscure; working with unsuccessful diligence at handicrafts; laboring on the wharves, or following the sea, as sailors before the mast; living here and there about the town, in hired tenements, and coming finally to the almshouse as the natural home of their old age.
A poor devil of a bookkeeper who had been working in Durham's for twenty years at a salary of six dollars a week, and might work there for twenty more and do no better, would yet consider himself a gentleman, as far removed as the poles from the most skilled worker on the killing beds; he would dress differently, and live in another part of the town, and come to work at a different hour of the day, and in every way make sure that he never rubbed elbows with a laboring man.
He had been comforting himself with the thought of a cottage, rude, indeed, but one which he might make neat and quiet, and where he might have a shelf for his Bible, and a place to be alone out of his laboring hours.