labourer


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labourer

(ˈleɪbərə) or

laborer

n
(Professions) a person engaged in physical work, esp of an unskilled kind
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.labourer - someone who works with their handslabourer - someone who works with their hands; someone engaged in manual labor
agricultural laborer, agricultural labourer - a person who tills the soil for a living
bracero - a Mexican laborer who worked in the United States on farms and railroads in order to ease labor shortages during World War II
cleaner - someone whose occupation is cleaning
day laborer, day labourer - a laborer who works by the day; for daily wages
digger - a laborer who digs
dishwasher - someone who washes dishes
navvy, peon, drudge, galley slave - a laborer who is obliged to do menial work
gandy dancer - a laborer in a railroad maintenance gang
gravedigger - a person who earns a living by digging graves
hewer - a person who hews
hired hand, hired man, hand - a hired laborer on a farm or ranch; "the hired hand fixed the railing"; "a ranch hand"
hod carrier, hodman - a laborer who carries supplies to masons or bricklayers
gipsy, gypsy, itinerant - a laborer who moves from place to place as demanded by employment; "itinerant traders"
faller, feller, logger, lumberjack, lumberman - a person who fells trees
miner, mineworker - laborer who works in a mine
mule driver, mule skinner, muleteer, skinner - a worker who drives mules
platelayer, tracklayer - a workman who lays and repairs railroad tracks
porter - a person employed to carry luggage and supplies
rail-splitter, splitter - a laborer who splits logs to build split-rail fences
sawyer - one who is employed to saw wood
section hand - a laborer assigned to a section gang
sprayer - a worker who applies spray to a surface
stacker - a laborer who builds up a stack or pile
steeplejack - someone who builds or maintains very tall structures
dock worker, docker, dockhand, dock-walloper, dockworker, loader, longshoreman, lumper, stevedore - a laborer who loads and unloads vessels in a port
fireman, stoker - a laborer who tends fires (as on a coal-fired train or steamship)
woodcutter - cuts down trees and chops wood as a job
working man, working person, workingman, workman - an employee who performs manual or industrial labor
wrecker - someone who demolishes or dismantles buildings as a job
yardman - a laborer hired to do outdoor work (such as mowing lawns)

labourer

noun worker, workman, working man, manual worker, hand, blue-collar worker, drudge, unskilled worker, navvy (Brit. informal), labouring man Her husband had been a farm labourer.
Proverbs
"The labourer is worthy of his hire"
Translations
عَامِلٌعامِل
dělníknádeník
arbejder
työläinen
radnik
kétkezi munkás
verkamaîur
労働者
노동자
arbetare
กรรมกร
người lao động

labourer

laborer (US) [ˈleɪbərəʳ] N (on roads etc) → peón m, obrero/a m/f; (= farm labourer) → trabajador(a) m/f del campo, peón m; (= day labourer) → jornalero/a m/f (Agr) → bracero/a m/f
bricklayer's labourerpeón m de albañil

labourer

[ˈleɪbərər] (British) laborer (US) n
(on building site, in factory)manœuvre mf
farm labourer → ouvrier/ière m/f agricolelabour force (British) labor force (US) n
[country] → population f active
Unemployment in Britain rose to 8.1% of the labour force → Le chômage au Royaume Uni atteignait 8.1% de la population active.
[company] → main-d'œuvre flabour-intensive [ˌleɪbərɪnˈtɛnsɪv] (British) labor-intensive (US) adj [method, industry] → gros consommateur de main d'œuvre(grosse)/trice
Construction remains a labour-intensive industry → Le bâtiment demeure une industrie grosse consommatrice de main d'œuvre.labour market (British) labor market (US) nmarché m du travailLabour movement (British) labour movement (British) labor movement (US) n
the Labour movement → le mouvement travaillistelabour pains (British) labor pains (US) npldouleurs fpl, douleurs fpl de l'accouchementLabour Party (British) n
the Labour Party → le parti travaillistelabour relations (British) labor relations (US) nplrelations fpl du travaillabour-saving [ˈleɪbərseɪvɪŋ] (British) labor-saving (US) adj [machine, gadget] → qui facilite le travail
labour-saving devices → appareils qui facilitent le travaillabour unrest (British) labor unrest (US) nagitation f socialelabour ward (British) labor ward (US) nsalle f de travail

labourer

, (US) laborer
n(Hilfs)arbeiter(in) m(f); (= farm labourer)Landarbeiter(in) m(f); (= day-labourer)Tagelöhner(in) m(f)

labourer

laborer (Am) [ˈleɪbərəʳ] n (on building site) → manovale m; (on farm) → bracciante m

labour

(American) labor (ˈleibə) noun
1. hard work. The building of the cathedral involved considerable labour over two centuries; People engaged in manual labour are often badly paid.
2. workmen on a job. The firm is having difficulty hiring labour.
3. (in a pregnant woman etc) the process of childbirth. She was in labour for several hours before the baby was born.
4. used (with capital) as a name for the Socialist party in the United Kingdom.
verb
1. to be employed to do hard and unskilled work. He spends the summer labouring on a building site.
2. to move or work etc slowly or with difficulty. They laboured through the deep undergrowth in the jungle; the car engine labours a bit on steep hills.
laborious (ləˈboːriəs) adjective
difficult; requiring hard work. Moving house is always a laborious process.
laˈboriously adverb
laˈboriousness noun
ˈlabourer noun
a workman who is employed to do heavy work requiring little skill. the labourers on a building site.
ˈlabour court noun
a court of law for settling disputes between management and workers.
ˈlabour dispute noun
a disagreement between management and workers about working conditions, pay etc.
ˈlabour-saving adjective
intended to lessen work. washing-machines and other labour-saving devices.

labourer

عَامِلٌ dělník arbejder Arbeiter χειρωνακτικός εργάτης jornalero työläinen travailleur manuel radnik operaio 労働者 노동자 arbeider arbeider robotnik trabalhador, trabalhador braçal рабочий arbetare กรรมกร işçi người lao động 劳工
References in classic literature ?
A few passers turned their heads, and a few shook their fingers at him as an aristocrat; otherwise, that a man in good clothes should be going to prison, was no more remarkable than that a labourer in working clothes should be going to work.
She ascertained from me in a few words what it was all about, comforted Dora, and gradually convinced her that I was not a labourer - from my manner of stating the case I believe Dora concluded that I was a navigator, and went balancing myself up and down a plank all day with a wheelbarrow - and so brought us together in peace.
I want to get work as a day labourer,' he answered.
No sooner is the exploitation of the labourer by the manufacturer,so far, at an end, that he receives his wages in cash, than he is set upon by the other portions of the bourgeoisie, the landlord,the shopkeeper, the pawnbroker, etc.
At first, proceeding from the problems of our own age, it seemed clear as daylight to me that the gradual widening of the present merely temporary and social difference between the Capitalist and the Labourer, was the key to the whole position.
The lowest labourer hires himself as a workman, but he doesn't make a slave of himself altogether; besides, he knows that he will be free again presently.
For a town or country labourer to practise thrift would be absolutely immoral.
Now and then there was a new arrival; perhaps a slouching labourer, who, having eaten his supper, came out to look at the unusual scene with a slow bovine gaze, willing to hear what any one had to say in explanation of it, but by no means excited enough to ask a question.
He always seems to think that he is addressing the House, and consequently whenever he discusses the state of the agricultural labourer, or the Welsh Church, or something quite improper of that kind, I am obliged to send all the servants out of the room.
Todd might easily get dropped by some man he'd never even heard of; some labourer he'd locked out, or some clerk in a business he'd busted.
Cut on one of these pillars we discovered the crude likeness of a mummy, by the head of which sat what appeared to be the figure of an Egyptian god, doubtless the handiwork of some old-world labourer in the mine.
Philip found himself sitting between an old labourer in corduroys, with string tied under his knees, and a shiny-faced lad of seventeen with a love-lock neatly plastered on his red forehead.