labourer

(redirected from Labourers)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

labourer

(ˈleɪbərə) or

laborer

n
(Professions) a person engaged in physical work, esp of an unskilled kind
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.labourer - someone who works with their handslabourer - someone who works with their hands; someone engaged in manual labor
agricultural laborer, agricultural labourer - a person who tills the soil for a living
bracero - a Mexican laborer who worked in the United States on farms and railroads in order to ease labor shortages during World War II
cleaner - someone whose occupation is cleaning
day laborer, day labourer - a laborer who works by the day; for daily wages
digger - a laborer who digs
dishwasher - someone who washes dishes
navvy, peon, drudge, galley slave - a laborer who is obliged to do menial work
gandy dancer - a laborer in a railroad maintenance gang
gravedigger - a person who earns a living by digging graves
hewer - a person who hews
hired hand, hired man, hand - a hired laborer on a farm or ranch; "the hired hand fixed the railing"; "a ranch hand"
hod carrier, hodman - a laborer who carries supplies to masons or bricklayers
gipsy, gypsy, itinerant - a laborer who moves from place to place as demanded by employment; "itinerant traders"
faller, feller, logger, lumberjack, lumberman - a person who fells trees
miner, mineworker - laborer who works in a mine
mule driver, mule skinner, muleteer, skinner - a worker who drives mules
platelayer, tracklayer - a workman who lays and repairs railroad tracks
porter - a person employed to carry luggage and supplies
rail-splitter, splitter - a laborer who splits logs to build split-rail fences
sawyer - one who is employed to saw wood
section hand - a laborer assigned to a section gang
sprayer - a worker who applies spray to a surface
stacker - a laborer who builds up a stack or pile
steeplejack - someone who builds or maintains very tall structures
dock worker, docker, dockhand, dock-walloper, dockworker, loader, longshoreman, lumper, stevedore - a laborer who loads and unloads vessels in a port
fireman, stoker - a laborer who tends fires (as on a coal-fired train or steamship)
woodcutter - cuts down trees and chops wood as a job
working man, working person, workingman, workman - an employee who performs manual or industrial labor
wrecker - someone who demolishes or dismantles buildings as a job
yardman - a laborer hired to do outdoor work (such as mowing lawns)

labourer

noun worker, workman, working man, manual worker, hand, blue-collar worker, drudge, unskilled worker, navvy (Brit. informal), labouring man Her husband had been a farm labourer.
Proverbs
"The labourer is worthy of his hire"
Translations
عَامِلٌعامِل
dělníknádeník
arbejder
työläinen
radnik
kétkezi munkás
verkamaîur
労働者
노동자
arbetare
กรรมกร
người lao động

labourer

laborer (US) [ˈleɪbərəʳ] N (on roads etc) → peón m, obrero/a m/f; (= farm labourer) → trabajador(a) m/f del campo, peón m; (= day labourer) → jornalero/a m/f (Agr) → bracero/a m/f
bricklayer's labourerpeón m de albañil

labourer

[ˈleɪbərər] (British) laborer (US) n
(on building site, in factory)manœuvre mf
farm labourer → ouvrier/ière m/f agricolelabour force (British) labor force (US) n
[country] → population f active
Unemployment in Britain rose to 8.1% of the labour force → Le chômage au Royaume Uni atteignait 8.1% de la population active.
[company] → main-d'œuvre flabour-intensive [ˌleɪbərɪnˈtɛnsɪv] (British) labor-intensive (US) adj [method, industry] → gros consommateur de main d'œuvre(grosse)/trice
Construction remains a labour-intensive industry → Le bâtiment demeure une industrie grosse consommatrice de main d'œuvre.labour market (British) labor market (US) nmarché m du travailLabour movement (British) labour movement (British) labor movement (US) n
the Labour movement → le mouvement travaillistelabour pains (British) labor pains (US) npldouleurs fpl, douleurs fpl de l'accouchementLabour Party (British) n
the Labour Party → le parti travaillistelabour relations (British) labor relations (US) nplrelations fpl du travaillabour-saving [ˈleɪbərseɪvɪŋ] (British) labor-saving (US) adj [machine, gadget] → qui facilite le travail
labour-saving devices → appareils qui facilitent le travaillabour unrest (British) labor unrest (US) nagitation f socialelabour ward (British) labor ward (US) nsalle f de travail

labourer

, (US) laborer
n(Hilfs)arbeiter(in) m(f); (= farm labourer)Landarbeiter(in) m(f); (= day-labourer)Tagelöhner(in) m(f)

labourer

laborer (Am) [ˈleɪbərəʳ] n (on building site) → manovale m; (on farm) → bracciante m

labour

(American) labor (ˈleibə) noun
1. hard work. The building of the cathedral involved considerable labour over two centuries; People engaged in manual labour are often badly paid.
2. workmen on a job. The firm is having difficulty hiring labour.
3. (in a pregnant woman etc) the process of childbirth. She was in labour for several hours before the baby was born.
4. used (with capital) as a name for the Socialist party in the United Kingdom.
verb
1. to be employed to do hard and unskilled work. He spends the summer labouring on a building site.
2. to move or work etc slowly or with difficulty. They laboured through the deep undergrowth in the jungle; the car engine labours a bit on steep hills.
laborious (ləˈboːriəs) adjective
difficult; requiring hard work. Moving house is always a laborious process.
laˈboriously adverb
laˈboriousness noun
ˈlabourer noun
a workman who is employed to do heavy work requiring little skill. the labourers on a building site.
ˈlabour court noun
a court of law for settling disputes between management and workers.
ˈlabour dispute noun
a disagreement between management and workers about working conditions, pay etc.
ˈlabour-saving adjective
intended to lessen work. washing-machines and other labour-saving devices.

labourer

عَامِلٌ dělník arbejder Arbeiter χειρωνακτικός εργάτης jornalero työläinen travailleur manuel radnik operaio 労働者 노동자 arbeider arbeider robotnik trabalhador, trabalhador braçal рабочий arbetare กรรมกร işçi người lao động 劳工
References in classic literature ?
Otto was already one of those drifting, case-hardened labourers who never marry or have children of their own.
What nonsense one talks, Miss Woodhouse, when hard at work, if one talks at all;your real workmen, I suppose, hold their tongues; but we gentlemen labourers if we get hold of a wordMiss Fairfax said something about conjecturing.
They are making hay, too, in Thornfield meadows: or rather, the labourers are just quitting their work, and returning home with their rakes on their shoulders, now, at the hour I arrive.
In the main street at the corner of the court, some labourers were repairing the gas-pipes, and had lighted a great fire in a brazier, round which a party of ragged men and boys were gathered: warming their hands and winking their eyes before the blaze in rapture.
I said aside, to Traddles, that I wondered whether it occurred to anybody, that there was a striking contrast between these plentiful repasts of choice quality, and the dinners, not to say of paupers, but of soldiers, sailors, labourers, the great bulk of the honest, working community; of whom not one man in five hundred ever dined half so well.
Not that the idea of being robbed presented itself often or strongly to his mind: hoarding was common in country districts in those days; there were old labourers in the parish of Raveloe who were known to have their savings by them, probably inside their flock-beds; but their rustic neighbours, though not all of them as honest as their ancestors in the days of King Alfred, had not imaginations bold enough to lay a plan of burglary.
So spake our Mother EVE, and ADAM heard VVell pleas'd, but answer'd not; for now too nigh Th' Archangel stood, and from the other Hill To thir fixt Station, all in bright array The Cherubim descended; on the ground Gliding meteorous, as Ev'ning Mist Ris'n from a River o're the marish glides, And gathers ground fast at the Labourers heel Homeward returning.
Upon these, and the like reasonings, their opinion is, that parents are the last of all others to be trusted with the education of their own children; and therefore they have in every town public nurseries, where all parents, except cottagers and labourers, are obliged to send their infants of both sexes to be reared and educated, when they come to the age of twenty moons, at which time they are supposed to have some rudiments of docility.
But I must tell you I engage my labourers without wages.
The Xumo, who superintended the work, would not allow any one to come near the labourers, but stood by, attended by the old monk, who almost sang himself to death.
I can tell you one day she posted herself on the top of the belfry of the village to call some labourers of theirs that were in a ploughed field of her father's, and though they were better than half a league off they heard her as well as if they were at the foot of the tower; and the best of her is that she is not a bit prudish, for she has plenty of affability, and jokes with everybody, and has a grin and a jest for everything.
It has converted the physician, the lawyer, the priest, the poet, the man of science, into its paid wage labourers.