lacquerwork


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

lacquerwork

(ˈlækəˌwɜːk)
n
(Crafts) lacquered wood, often with ivory inlays
References in periodicals archive ?
Japanning - a finish used on furniture and ornaments that imitated Asian lacquerwork - had its base here.
Through these trade routes, Chinese silk, porcelain and lacquerwork were shipped to the West, while pepper, flax and spices entered China.
Gold-plated filigree over-lays, lacquerwork and coloured celluloid decoration are sought-after.
Gray was one of the great innovators of modern times, her designs feted across the continent; Goff considers her achievements in fields as diverse as architecture, lacquerwork, carpet design and furniture, as well as her complex relationships with peers such as Le Corbusier.
Caption: 3 Displays at the Botanical Survey of India Industrial Section in Kolkata showing products derived from lac insects: dye, lacquerwork, shellac and the first gramophone records.
The Pompidou show covered Gray's career via a more or less chronological installation, beginning with her lacquerwork, then showcasing the rugs and furniture she produced for Jean Desert and private clients in the '20s, and then devoting large galleries to her plans, designs, and furnishings for E 1027 and another Provencal villa, Tempe a Pailla (1935).
Dupont is celebrating that most magical of Arabian tales with a starlight collection of lacquerwork pens, ink bottles and clever letter openers -- shaped like a sword that's as beautiful and collectable as it is covetable.
In 1901, Eileen Gray enrolled in the Slade School of Fine Arts, where she learned drawing and painting, and in London she discovered the art form that would change the trajectory of her career: Asian lacquerwork.
of course, in this transition to new forms some pre-Hispanic techniques persisted in ceramics, textiles, and lacquerwork and, most importantly in featherwork (feather mosaic) and corn-pith sculpture.
Earlier in the trip, we'd sipped potent millet alcohol from lacquerwork goblets in the shrine room of a village headman's house on a remote mountaintop.
Eileen Gray experimented with Oriental lacquerwork, designing screens, furniture, bowls and plates with traditional Japanese inlays such as crushed eggshell and mother of pearl.
She purchased prodigiously every kind of decorative art: furniture, marquetry, jewellery, glasswork and crystal, lacquerwork, fancy ironware, tapestries and carpets, ceramics and so on, making her numerous residences veritable treasure troves as well as pleasure zones.