ladder


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lad·der

 (lăd′ər)
n.
1.
a. An often portable structure consisting of two long sides crossed by parallel rungs, used to climb up and down.
b. Something that resembles this device, especially a run in a stocking.
2.
a. A means of moving higher or lower, as in a hierarchy: used his accomplishments as a ladder to success.
b. A series of ranked stages or levels: high on the executive ladder.
3. A fish ladder.
4. Sports
a. An athletic workout in which one does progressively longer intervals followed by progressively shorter intervals.
b. One of the intervals in such a workout.
intr.v. lad·dered, lad·der·ing, lad·ders
To run, as a stocking does.

[Middle English, from Old English hlǣder; see klei- in Indo-European roots.]

ladder

(ˈlædə)
n
1. a portable framework of wood, metal, rope, etc, in the form of two long parallel members connected by several parallel rungs or steps fixed to them at right angles, for climbing up or down
2. any hierarchy conceived of as having a series of ascending stages, levels, etc: the social ladder.
3.
a. anything resembling a ladder
b. (as modifier): ladder stitch.
4. (Knitting & Sewing) chiefly Also called: run Brit a line of connected stitches that have come undone in knitted material, esp stockings
5. (General Sporting Terms) See ladder tournament
vb
(Knitting & Sewing) chiefly Brit to cause a line of interconnected stitches in (stockings, etc) to undo, as by snagging, or (of a stocking) to come undone in this way
[Old English hlǣdder; related to Old High German leitara]

lad•der

(ˈlæd ər)

n.
1. a structure of wood, metal, or rope commonly consisting of two sidepieces between which a series of rungs are set at suitable distances to provide a means of climbing up or down.
2. a means of rising, as to eminence: the ladder of success.
3. a graded series of stages or levels in status: high on the political ladder.
4. Chiefly Brit. a run in a stocking.
[before 1000; Middle English laddre, Old English hlǣder, c. Middle Dutch lēdere, Old High German leitara; akin to Gothic hleithra tent, and to lid, lean1]

ladder


Past participle: laddered
Gerund: laddering

Imperative
ladder
ladder
Present
I ladder
you ladder
he/she/it ladders
we ladder
you ladder
they ladder
Preterite
I laddered
you laddered
he/she/it laddered
we laddered
you laddered
they laddered
Present Continuous
I am laddering
you are laddering
he/she/it is laddering
we are laddering
you are laddering
they are laddering
Present Perfect
I have laddered
you have laddered
he/she/it has laddered
we have laddered
you have laddered
they have laddered
Past Continuous
I was laddering
you were laddering
he/she/it was laddering
we were laddering
you were laddering
they were laddering
Past Perfect
I had laddered
you had laddered
he/she/it had laddered
we had laddered
you had laddered
they had laddered
Future
I will ladder
you will ladder
he/she/it will ladder
we will ladder
you will ladder
they will ladder
Future Perfect
I will have laddered
you will have laddered
he/she/it will have laddered
we will have laddered
you will have laddered
they will have laddered
Future Continuous
I will be laddering
you will be laddering
he/she/it will be laddering
we will be laddering
you will be laddering
they will be laddering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been laddering
you have been laddering
he/she/it has been laddering
we have been laddering
you have been laddering
they have been laddering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been laddering
you will have been laddering
he/she/it will have been laddering
we will have been laddering
you will have been laddering
they will have been laddering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been laddering
you had been laddering
he/she/it had been laddering
we had been laddering
you had been laddering
they had been laddering
Conditional
I would ladder
you would ladder
he/she/it would ladder
we would ladder
you would ladder
they would ladder
Past Conditional
I would have laddered
you would have laddered
he/she/it would have laddered
we would have laddered
you would have laddered
they would have laddered

ladder

(in pantyhose) run
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ladder - steps consisting of two parallel members connected by rungsladder - steps consisting of two parallel members connected by rungs; for climbing up or down
articulated ladder - a ladder consisting of segments (usually four) that are held together by joints that can lock in place
extension ladder - a ladder whose length can be extended
jack ladder, pilot ladder, Jacob's ladder - (nautical) a hanging ladder of ropes or chains supporting wooden or metal rungs or steps
monkey ladder - a light ladder to the monkey bridge on a ship
rope ladder - a ladder with side pieces of rope
rundle, rung, spoke - one of the crosspieces that form the steps of a ladder
scaling ladder - a ladder used to scale walls (as in an attack)
sea ladder, sea steps - (nautical) ladder to be lowered over a ship's side for coming aboard
stairs, steps - a flight of stairs or a flight of steps
step ladder, stepladder - a folding portable ladder hinged at the top
2.ladder - ascending stages by which somebody or something can progress; "he climbed the career ladder"
degree, stage, level, point - a specific identifiable position in a continuum or series or especially in a process; "a remarkable degree of frankness"; "at what stage are the social sciences?"
3.ladder - a row of unravelled stitches; "she got a run in her stocking"
damage, impairment, harm - the occurrence of a change for the worse
Verb1.ladder - come unraveled or undone as if by snagging; "Her nylons were running"
unravel, run - become undone; "the sweater unraveled"
come apart, break, split up, fall apart, separate - become separated into pieces or fragments; "The figurine broke"; "The freshly baked loaf fell apart"

ladder

noun
1. steps, set of steps She broke her arm when she fell off a ladder.
2. hierarchy, ranking, pecking order She admired her sister for climbing up the social ladder.
Translations
تَنْسيل طولي في جوارِب النِّساءسُلَّمٌسُلَّميُنسِل الخَيط
žebříkpuštěné okopustit okožebříček
stigeder er løbetløbemaske
escaleraescalera (de mano)
tikkaattikapuut
échelleen échellefiler
ljestve
lefutó szemleszalad a szemlétra
gera/fá lykkjufalllykkjufallstigi
はしご
사다리
kopėčioslaipteliainubėgusi akispaleisti akįsuplėšyti
kāpnesnoirtnoiruši valdziņi
pustiť očkorebrík
lestev
stege
บันได
çorabı kaçmakçorap kaçığıel merdivenikaçıkseyyar merdiven
thang

ladder

[ˈlædəʳ]
A. N
1.escalera f de mano
see also extension B
see also rope C
2. (fig) → escala f, jerarquía f
the social ladderla escala social
it's a first step up the ladderes el primer peldaño
it's a first step up the ladder of successes el primer paso hacia el éxito
to be at the top of the ladderestar en la cumbre de su profesión
3. (Brit) (in stockings) → carrera f
B. VT (Brit) [+ stocking, tights] → hacer una carrera en
C. VI (Brit) [stocking] → hacerse una carrera

ladder

[ˈlædər]
n
(wooden, metal)échelle f
(fig)échelle f
the social ladder → l'échelle sociale
the career ladder → l'échelle professionnelle
(British) (in tights)échelle f
You have a ladder in your tights → Tu as une échelle à ton collant.
vt (British) [+ tights] → filer
vi (British) [tights] → filer

ladder

n
Leiter f
(fig)(Stufen)leiter f; to be at the top/bottom of the ladderganz oben/unten auf der Leiter stehen; evolutionary ladderLeiter fder Evolution; social ladderLeiter fdes gesellschaftlichen Erfolges; to move up the social/career laddergesellschaftlich/beruflich aufsteigen; to move up the housing ladderein anspruchsvolleres Haus kaufen; it’s a first step up the ladderdas ist ein Anfang; a big step up the ladderein großer Schritt nach vorn ? top
(Brit: in stocking) → Laufmasche f
vt (Brit) stockingzerreißen; I’ve laddered my tightsich habe mir eine Laufmasche (in meiner Strumpfhose) geholt
vi (Brit: stocking) → Laufmaschen bekommen

ladder

[ˈlædəʳ]
1. nscala a pioli; (stepladder) → scala a libretto (Brit) (in tights) → smagliatura
social ladder → scala sociale
it's the first step up the ladder → è il primo passo sulla via del successo
2. vt (Brit) (tights) → smagliare
3. vi (Brit) (tights) → smagliarsi

ladder

(ˈlӕdə) noun
1. a set of rungs or steps between two long supports, for climbing up or down. She was standing on a ladder painting the ceiling; the ladder of success.
2. (American run) a long, narrow flaw caused by the breaking of a stitch in a stocking or other knitted fabric.
verb
to (cause to) develop such a flaw. I laddered my best pair of tights today; Fine stockings ladder very easily.

ladder

سُلَّمٌ žebřík stige Leiter σκάλα escalera tikkaat échelle ljestve scala はしご 사다리 ladder stige drabina escada лестница stege บันได taşınır merdiven thang 梯子
References in classic literature ?
Roderigo produced a rope ladder, with five steps to it, threw up one end, and invited Zara to descend.
Heavy clouds had drifted across the face of the moon, and before them in the deep twi- light went a man with a short ladder upon his shoul- der.
Please come down," he insisted, holding the ladder and looking up at her.
There was no great probability, therefore, of his volunteering information, out of his dungeon, that should elevate me still higher on the ladder of prosperity.
For I was not prepared to see Father Mapple after gaining the height, slowly turn round, and stooping over the pulpit, deliberately drag up the ladder step by step, till the whole was deposited within, leaving him impregnable in his little Quebec.
I say, Towler," said the hostler, "just run up the ladder into the loft and put some hay down into this horse's rack, will you?
Jurgis bounded to a door of the room and flung it open; there was a ladder leading through a trap door to the garret, and he was at the foot of it when suddenly he heard a voice behind him, and saw Marija at his heels.
So she would," said Andy; "but can't ye see through a ladder, ye black nigger?
Fair sir, of your kindness will ye climb the ladder there, and bring me news of what ye find?
By and by I heard the king and the duke come up; so I rolled off my pallet and laid with my chin at the top of my ladder, and waited to see if anything was going to happen.
Pudd'nhead was still toiling in obscurity at the bottom of the ladder, under the blight of that unlucky remark which he had let fall twenty-three years before about the dog.
Rebecca heard the sound of the sewing machine in the dining-room and the chopping of meat in the kitchen; so knowing the whereabouts of both her aunts, she scrambled out of the window, caught hold of the lightning rod, slid down to the helpful cleat, jumped to the porch, used the woodbine trellis for a ladder, and was flying up the road in the storm before she had time to arrange any details of her future movements.