ladies


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la·dy

(lā′dē)
n. pl. la·dies
1. A woman of high social standing or refinement, especially when viewed as dignified or well-mannered.
2. A woman who is the head of a household: Is the lady of the house at home?
3.
a. A woman, especially when spoken of or to in a polite way: Ladies, may I show you to your table?
b. Used as a form of address for a woman, often with sarcasm or irritation: Look, lady, I was ahead of you in line.
4.
a. A woman who is the object of romantic or chivalrous love: a knight serving his lady.
b. Informal A wife or girlfriend: a man kissing his lady at the airport.
5. A lady in waiting: the queen and her ladies.
6. Lady Chiefly British
a. A general feminine title of nobility and other rank, specifically as the title for the wife or widow of a knight or baronet.
b. Used as a form of address for a woman of high rank, especially for a marchioness, countess, viscountess, baroness, or baronetess.
7. Lady The Virgin Mary. Usually used with Our.

[Middle English, mistress of a household, from Old English hlǣfdige; see dheigh- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: The word lady goes back to Old English and was traditionally used for a woman of social standing or rank. Perhaps because of the word's association with high society, today lady is most acceptable in parallel with gentleman, as in the sentences Ladies and gentlemen, your attention please! and At the opera for the first time, they were dazzled by all of the ladies in ball gowns and gentlemen in sharp tuxedos. This latter sentence was approved by 91 percent of the Usage Panel in our 2016 survey. By contrast, the sentence Nancy Brown will be the first lady to serve as chair of the committee was accepted by only 29 percent of the Panel, with many panelists commenting that the use of lady where woman would easily do can be taken as offensive. The degree to which lady is or isn't considered offensive has become dependent on context. When presented with a range of sentences using lady in formal and informal contexts with both male and female speakers, many members of the Panel stated that they found lady to be acceptable and inoffensive when used ironically or jocularly. · The use of lady as an attributive to modify another noun, as in the phrase lady doctor, is widely considered offensive. When the sex of the person is relevant, the preferred modifier is woman or female. See Usage Note at female.

ladies

or

ladies' room

n
(functioning as singular) informal a women's public lavatory
Translations
dámské záchody
dametoilet
naisten wc
ženski toalet
女性用トイレ
여자 화장실
žensko stranišče
damtoalett
ห้องน้ำสตรี
phòng vệ sinh nữ

ladies

[ˈleɪdɪz] nsg ladies' room n (lavatory) the ladiesi gabinetti per signore, la toilette f inv
"Ladies" → "signore"
where is the Ladies? → dov'è la toilette? (per signore)

ladies

مَرَاحِيضُ السَّيَداتُ dámské záchody dametoilet Damentoilette τουαλέτα γυναικών aseo de señoras, baño de mujeres naisten wc toilettes pour femmes ženski toalet bagno delle donne 女性用トイレ 여자 화장실 damestoilet dametoalett damska toaleta casa de banho das senhoras, toalete feminino женский туалет damtoalett ห้องน้ำสตรี kadınlar tuvaleti phòng vệ sinh nữ 女厕所
References in classic literature ?
When the ladies of Gaunt House were at breakfast that morning, Lord Steyne (who took his chocolate in private and seldom disturbed the females of his household, or saw them except upon public days, or when they crossed each other in the hall, or when from his pit-box at the opera he surveyed them in their box on the grand tier) his lordship, we say, appeared among the ladies and the children who were assembled over the tea and toast, and a battle royal ensued apropos of Rebecca.
In the meanwhile, ladies, be as proud and virtuous as you like abroad, but don't give ME any airs.
There were families in London who would have sacrificed a year's income to receive such an honour at the hands of those great ladies.
Some of the ladies did know this rather extraordinary niece of their fellow-member, and nearly all had heard of her; but not one of them could think of anything to say, just then.
A great many ladies talked then, and several of them talked all at once, and even more loudly and more unpleasantly than before.
But she had beauty, pride, ambition, insolent resolve, and sense enough to portion out a legion of fine ladies.
For Isabel's own sake, therefore--to say nothing of other reasons--it was urgently desirable to keep the peace between the two ladies.
In the mean time, the interview between the two ladies began in a manner which would have astonished Mr.
Wardle was in the very height of his jollity; and he was so funny in his management of the board, and the old ladies were so sharp after their winnings, that the whole table was in a perpetual roar of merriment and laughter.
A singular tale had gone abroad among the ladies of the province, that their fair rival was indebted for much of the irresistible charm of her appearance to a certain article of dress--an embroidered mantle--which had been wrought by the most skilful artist in London, and possessed even magical properties of adornment.
Without much extravagance of eulogy, the spectacle might even be termed splendid; for, according to the fashion of the times, the ladies shone in rich silks and satins, outspread over wide-projecting hoops; and the gentlemen glittered in gold embroidery, laid unsparingly upon the purple, or scarlet, or sky-blue velvet, which was the material of their coats and waistcoats.
thank God, we have got nothing to do with him, in this business of the Diamond; he had the longest tongue and the shortest temper of any man, high or low, I ever met with)--I say, I went into the service of the old lord, as page-boy in waiting on the three honourable young ladies, at the age of fifteen years.