lake


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Related to lake: Lake Vostok

Lake

or Lake of  (lāk) or Loch (lŏk, lôKH)
For the names of actual lakes, see the specific element of the name; for example, Erie, Lake; Lucerne, Lake of; Lomond, Loch. Other geographic names beginning with Lake are entered under Lake; for example, Lake Charles, Louisiana.

lake 1

 (lāk)
n.
1. A large inland body of fresh water or salt water.
2. A scenic pond, as in a park.
3. A large pool of liquid: a lake of spilled coffee on my desk.

[Middle English, from Old French lac and from Old English lacu, both from Latin lacus.]

lake 2

 (lāk)
n.
1. A pigment consisting of organic coloring matter with an inorganic, usually metallic base or carrier, used in dyes, inks, and paints.
2. A deep red.

[From French laque; see lac1.]

lake

(leɪk)
n
1. (Physical Geography) an expanse of water entirely surrounded by land and unconnected to the sea except by rivers or streams.
2. anything resembling this
3. a surplus of a liquid commodity: a wine lake.
[C13: lac, via Old French from Latin lacus basin]

lake

(leɪk)
n
1. (Dyeing) a bright pigment used in textile dyeing and printing inks, produced by the combination of an organic colouring matter with an inorganic compound, usually a metallic salt, oxide, or hydroxide. See also mordant
2. (Dyeing) a red dye obtained by combining a metallic compound with cochineal
[C17: variant of lac1]

lake1

(leɪk)

n.
1. a body of fresh or salt water of considerable size, surrounded by land.
2. any similar body or pool of other liquid, as oil.
[before 1000; Middle English lak(e),lac(e) < Old French lac < Latin lacus]

lake2

(leɪk)

n.
1. any of various pigments prepared from animal, vegetable, or coal-tar coloring matters by chemical or other union with metallic compounds.
2. a red pigment prepared from lac or cochineal by combination with a metallic compound.
[1610–20; variant of lac1]

Lake

(leɪk)

n.
Simon, 1866–1945, U.S. engineer and naval architect.

lake

(lāk)
A large inland body of standing fresh or salt water.

lake

  • demersal - Describing a fish that lives close to the floor of the sea or a lake.
  • eyot, ait - A small island in a river or lake is an eyot or ait.
  • benthos - The flora and fauna at the bottom of a sea or lake.
  • lagoon - Derived from Latin lacuna, "pool, lake" or "hole, gap."

lake

A large sheet of water surrounded by land or, more rarely, ice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lake - a body of (usually fresh) water surrounded by landlake - a body of (usually fresh) water surrounded by land
artificial lake, man-made lake, reservoir - lake used to store water for community use
bayou - a swampy arm or slow-moving outlet of a lake (term used mainly in Mississippi and Louisiana)
body of water, water - the part of the earth's surface covered with water (such as a river or lake or ocean); "they invaded our territorial waters"; "they were sitting by the water's edge"
floor - the bottom surface of any lake or other body of water
inlet, recess - an arm off of a larger body of water (often between rocky headlands)
lagoon, laguna, lagune - a body of water cut off from a larger body by a reef of sand or coral
loch - Scottish word for a lake
lough - Irish word for a lake
oxbow lake - a crescent-shaped lake (often temporary) that is formed when a meander of a river is cut off from the main channel
pond, pool - a small lake; "the pond was too small for sailing"
shore - the land along the edge of a body of water
tarn - a mountain lake (especially one formed by glaciers)
lentic - of or relating to or living in still waters (as lakes or ponds)
2.lake - a purplish red pigment prepared from lac or cochineal
pigment - dry coloring material (especially a powder to be mixed with a liquid to produce paint, etc.)
3.lake - any of numerous bright translucent organic pigments
pigment - dry coloring material (especially a powder to be mixed with a liquid to produce paint, etc.)

lake

noun pond, pool, reservoir, loch (Scot.), lagoon, mere, lough (Irish), tarn They can go fishing in the lake.
Related words
adjective lacustrine

Lakes, lochs, and loughs

Allen, Annecy, Aral Sea or Lake Aral, Ard, Athabaska, Averno, Awe, Baikal, Bala, Balaton, Balkhash, Bangweulu, Bassenthwaite, Belfast, Biel, Bodensee, Buttermere, Caspian Sea, Chad, Champlain, Como, Coniston Water, Constance, Crummock Water, Dead Sea, Derwentwater, Dongting, Earn, Edward, Ennerdale Water, Erie, Erne, Eyre, Frome, Fyne, Garda, Gatún, Geneva, Grasmere, Great Bear, Great Bitter, Great Lakes, Great Salt, Great Slave, Hawes Water, Huron, Ijsselmeer or Ysselmeer, Iliamna, Ilmen, Issyk-Kul, Kariba, Katrine, Kivu, Koko Nor or Kuku Nor, Kootenay, Ladoga, Laggan, Lake of the Woods, Leven, Linnhe, Little Bitter, Lochy, Lomond, Lucerne, Lugano, Léman, Maggiore, Malawi, Managua, Manitoba, Maracaibo, Mead, Meech, Memphremagog, Menteith, Michigan, Miraflores, Mistassini, Mobutu, Morar, Mweru, Nam Co or Nam Tso, Nasser, Neagh, Ness, Neuchâtel, Nicaragua, Nipigon, Nipissing, No, Nyasa, Okanagan, Okeechobee, Onega, Oneida, Onondaga, Ontario, Patos, Peipus, Pontchartrain, Poopó, Poyang or P'o-yang, Pskov, Rannoch, Reindeer, Rudolf, Saint Clair, Saint John, Sea of Galilee, Sevan, Stanley Pool, Superior, Sween, Taal, Tahoe, Tana, Tanganyika, Taupo, Tay, Thirlmere, Thun, Tien, Titicaca, Tonle Sap, Torrens, Torridon, Trasimene, Tummel, Turkana, Ullswater, Urmia, Van, Victoria, Volta, Waikaremoana, Washington, Wast Water, Windermere, Winnebago, Winnipeg, Zug, Zürich
Translations
بُحَيْرَةٌبُحَيْرَه
езеро
jezero
lago
järv
دریاچه
järvilakka
झील
jezero
lakk
danau
stöîuvatnvatn
호수
lacus
ežeras
ezers
lac
jazero
jezero
sjö
ทะเลสาบ
озеро
دریاچہ
hồhồ nước

lake

1 [leɪk]
A. Nlago m
the Lakes (Brit) = the Lake District Lake Michiganel Lago Michigan
the Great Lakeslos Grandes Lagos
wine lakeexcedentes mpl de vino
oh! go and jump in a lake!¡que te zurzan!, ¡vete a freír espárragos!
B. CPD the Lake District Nel País de los Lagos (región de lagos en el noroeste de Inglaterra)
lake dweller N (Hist) habitante de una población lacustre
lake dwelling Nvivienda f lacustre

lake

2 [leɪk] N (= colour) → laca f

lake

[ˈleɪk] nlac m
Lake Geneva → le lac Léman

lake

:
Lake Constance
nder Bodensee
Lake District
nLake District m (Seengebiet im NW Englands)
lake dweller
nPfahlbaubewohner(in) m(f)
lake dwelling
nPfahlbau m
Lake Poets
pl Dichter des Lake District: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Southey
lakeside
nSeeufer nt
attram See

lake

1
nSee m

lake

2
n (colour) → Karm(es)inrot nt

lake

[leɪk] nlago

lake

(leik) noun
a large area of water surrounded by land. They go swimming in / sailing on the lake; Lake Michigan.

lake

بُحَيْرَةٌ jezero See λίμνη lago järvi lac jezero lago 호수 meer innsjø jezioro lago озеро sjö ทะเลสาบ göl hồ nước
References in classic literature ?
Schemes of Captain Bonneville The Great Salt Lake Expedition to explore it Preparations for a journey to the Bighorn
We lunched at the curious old town of Como, at the foot of the lake, and then took the small steamer and had an afternoon's pleasure excursion to this place,--Bellaggio.
The Catholic chapel might often be seen planted beside the trading house, and its spire surmounted by a cross, towering from the midst of an Indian village, on the banks of a river or a lake.
A strayed Indian from Lake Le Barge was willing to take his place; but Kama was obdurate.
The principal aim of his journey was to reconnoitre Lake Tchad, from which he was still three hundred and fifty miles distant.
In the middle of the garden they found a large lake, and when they reached the edge of it the Lake began to speak, and said to them, 'What men are you, and what brings you here?
During the night of the 5th of December, the train ran south-easterly for about fifty miles; then rose an equal distance in a north-easterly direction, towards the Great Salt Lake.
We went up the coast some ten or twelve miles in the U-33, tying up to shore near the mouth of a small stream which emptied great volumes of crude oil into the sea--I find it difficult to call this great lake by any other name.
There was the bright little water spring, from which we drank when we were weary and thirsty in sultry summer days, still bubbling its way downward to the lake as cheerily as ever.
IN spring of youth it was my lot To haunt of the wide earth a spot The which I could not love the less -- So lovely was the loneliness Of a wild lake, with black rock bound, And the tall pines that tower'd around.
Suddenly, Raoul remembered something about a gate opening into the Rue Scribe, an underground passage running straight to the Rue Scribe from the lake.
Especially do I remember the hunger we endured on the mountains between Long Lake and Far Lake, and the calf we caught sleeping in the thicket.