lama


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la·ma

 (lä′mə)
n.
In Tibetan Buddhism, one who is a religious teacher or is in a position of authority in a monastic community.

[Tibetan bla-ma, perhaps from bla, high, soul.]

lama

(ˈlɑːmə)
n
(Buddhism) a priest or monk of Lamaism
[C17: from Tibetan blama]

la•ma

(ˈlɑ mə)

n., pl. -mas.
a Lamaist monk.
[1645–55; < Tibetan lama (sp. bla ma) a monk of high rank, literally, superior one]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lama - a Tibetan or Mongolian priest of Lamaismlama - a Tibetan or Mongolian priest of Lamaism
Dalai Lama, Grand Lama - chief lama and once ruler of Tibet
Panchen Lama - the lama next in rank to the Dalai Lama
non-Christian priest, priest - a person who performs religious duties and ceremonies in a non-Christian religion
2.Lama - llamas
mammal genus - a genus of mammals
Camelidae, family Camelidae - camels and llamas and vicunas
domestic llama, Lama peruana - used in the Andes as a beast of burden and source of wool; considered a domesticated variety of the guanaco
guanaco, Lama guanicoe - wild llama
Lama pacos, alpaca - domesticated llama with long silky fleece; believed to be a domesticated variety of the guanaco

lama

noun Buddhist priest, Buddhist monk It takes twenty to twenty-five years to qualify as a lama.
Translations
lamao
lama
láma
lama
lama

lama

[ˈlɑːmə] Nlama m

lama

[ˈlɑːmə] nlama m

lama

n (Rel) → Lama m

lama

[ˈlɑːmə] n (Rel) → lama m inv
References in classic literature ?
I am no Khitai, but a Bhotiya [Tibetan], since you must know - a lama - or, say, a guru in your tongue.
In open-mouthed wonder the lama turned to this and that, and finally checked in rapt attention before a large alto- relief representing a coronation or apotheosis of the Lord Buddha.
It is Sakya Muni himself,' the lama half sobbed; and under his breath began the wonderful Buddhist invocation:
A white-bearded Englishman was looking at the lama, who gravely turned and saluted him and after some fumbling drew forth a note-book and a scrap of paper.
One of us who had made pilgrimage to the Holy Places - he is now Abbot of the Lung-Cho Monastery - gave it me,' stammered the lama.
The lama, haltingly at first, spoke to the Curator of his own lamassery, the Such-zen, opposite the Painted Rocks, four months' march away.
The lama mounted a pair of horn-rimmed spectacles of Chinese work.
Out shuffled the lama to the main hall, and, the Curator beside him, went through the collection with the reverence of a devotee and the appreciative instinct of a craftsman.
I travelled for two years in Tibet, therefore, and amused myself by visiting Lhassa, and spending some days with the head lama.
Aunt Ablewhite would listen to the Grand Lama of Thibet exactly as she listens to Me, and would reflect his views quite as readily as she reflects mine.
And he met Thibetan herdsmen with their dogs and flocks of sheep, each sheep with a little bag of borax on his back, and wandering wood-cutters, and cloaked and blanketed Lamas from Thibet, coming into India on pilgrimage, and envoys of little solitary Hill-states, posting furiously on ring-streaked and piebald ponies, or the cavalcade of a Rajah paying a visit; or else for a long, clear day he would see nothing more than a black bear grunting and rooting below in the valley.
mudjoes, readers, novices, vicars, pastors, rabbis, ulemas, lamas,