lame duck

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Related to lame-duck: Lame-Duck Amendment

lame duck

n.
1.
a. An elected officeholder or group continuing in office during the period between failure to win an election and the inauguration of a successor.
b. An officeholder who has chosen not to run for reelection or is ineligible for reelection.
2. An ineffective person; a weakling.

[Originally 18th-century British stock exchange slang, defaulter, one who has defaulted on debts (perhaps because such defaulters were likened to injured ducks waddling away from Change Alley, the narrow London side street where share trading was carried out in coffeehouses; compare similar zoomorphic 18th-century stock market terms, such as bear and bull).]

lame′-duck′ adj.

lame duck

n
1. a person or thing that is disabled or ineffectual
2. (Stock Exchange) stock exchange a speculator who cannot discharge his or her liabilities
3. (Commerce) a company with a large workforce and high prestige that is unable to meet foreign competition without government support
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. an elected official or body of officials remaining in office in the interval between the election and inauguration of a successor
b. (as modifier): a lame-duck president.
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (modifier) US designating a term of office after which the officeholder will not run for re-election

lame′ duck′


n.
1. an elected official or group continuing in office in the period between an election defeat and a successor's assumption of office.
2. a president who is completing a term of office and chooses not to run or is ineligible to run for reelection.
3. anyone or anything soon to be supplanted by another.
4. a person or thing that is disabled, ineffective, or inefficient.
[1755–65]
lame′-duck′, adj.

lame duck

An elected representative or administration that has failed to win re-election but continues in power until the inauguration of the winner of the last election.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lame duck - an elected official still in office but not slated to continuelame duck - an elected official still in office but not slated to continue
elected official - official who won the office in a free election
Translations
canard boiteux

lame duck

nNiete f (inf); lame duck companyunwirtschaftliche Firma

lame duck

n (person) → persona inetta; (firm) → azienda traballante
a lame duck president (Am) presidente uscente
References in periodicals archive ?
the 22nd Amendment, ratified in 1951, built a certain lame-duck status into the presidency when it prohibited presidents from running for a third term.
I want to make sure that the constituents in the Seventh District will have a voice in what will be a very consequential lame-duck session," he added.
Why Deal With A Lame-duck Congress On A Long-term Issue.
lame-duck presidents to make last-minute appointments, regulations, and even international agreements.
I truly believe that if we can get the deficit and debt issues solved, which I believe we can get done in the lame-duck or in the immediate aftermath of the lame-duck, then that clears away a lot of the ideological underbrush," he said.
Following the 20-minute talk, Kingston told Food Chemical News that funding for nutrition programs, including SNAP and other federal programs, like school meals, must be up for negotiation when Congress returns in the lame-duck session, if a farm bill is to be passed.
This is a lame-duck England team with a lame duck-faced manager and largely lame players and I would lay them until the cows come home if only the cows had travelled with their other halves.
The late, great New York Times columnist and language expert might have wished to revise that definition in light of the current lame-duck session of Congress.
One certainty about the lame-duck session is that members must act on federal budget appropriations for FY 2011.
Summary: WASHINGTON: Senate Republicans promised Wednesday to block legislative action on every issue being considered by the lame-duck Congress until the row over extending the Bush-era tax cuts is resolved and an extension of current government funding is approved.
After months of negotiations with the White House, he has decided to try to block the lame-duck Senate from ratifying the New Start arms control treaty.
A lame-duck period comes between the congressional election in November and the start of the new congress in January.