lameness


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lame 1

 (lām)
adj. lam·er, lam·est
1. Disabled so that movement, especially walking, is difficult or impossible: Lame from the accident, he walked with a cane. A lame wing kept the bird from flying.
2. Marked by pain or rigidness: a lame back.
3. Weak or ineffectual: a lame attempt to apologize.
4.
a. Informal Dull or unsatisfactory: That movie was so lame!
b. Slang Socially inappropriate; foolish.
tr.v. lamed, lam·ing, lames
To cause to become lame; cripple.

[Middle English, from Old English lama.]

lame′ly adv.
lame′ness n.

lame 2

 (lām)
n.
A thin metal plate, especially one of the overlapping steel plates in medieval armor.

[French, from Old French, from Latin lāmina, thin plate.]

la·mé

 (lă-mā′)
n.
A shiny fabric woven with metallic threads, often of gold or silver.

[French, spangled, laminated, lamé, from Old French lame, thin metal plate; see lame2.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lameness - disability of walking due to crippling of the legs or feetlameness - disability of walking due to crippling of the legs or feet
disability of walking - a disability that interferes with or prevents walking
intermittent claudication - lameness due to pain in leg muscles because the blood supply is inadequate; pain subsides with rest
2.lameness - an imperfection or defectiveness; "a stylist noted for the lameness of his plots"
defectiveness, faultiness - the state of being defective
Translations
عَرَج
kulhavost
det at være halt
bénaságsántaság
helti
chromosť
topallık

lameness

[ˈleɪmnɪs] N
1. [of person, horse, leg] → cojera f, renquera f
2. (fig) → pobreza f

lameness

[ˈleɪmnɪs] n [person, horse] → boiterie f

lameness

n
Lähmung f (→ in, of +gen); his lamenesssein Gelähmtsein nt
(fig) (of excuse)Lahmheit f; (of argument)Schwäche f, → mangelnde Überzeugungskraft

lameness

[ˈleɪmnɪs] nzoppia

lame

(leim) adjective
1. unable to walk properly. He was lame for weeks after his fall.
2. not satisfactory; unacceptable. a lame excuse.
verb
to make unable to walk properly. He was lamed by a bullet in the ankle.
ˈlamely adverb
ˈlameness noun
References in classic literature ?
If I might advise, sir, you had better drive him gently for awhile; the foot is a good deal hurt, and the lameness will not go off directly.
My wretched feet, flayed and swollen to lameness by the sharp air of January, began to heal and subside under the gentler breathings of April; the nights and mornings no longer by their Canadian temperature froze the very blood in our veins; we could now endure the play-hour passed in the garden: sometimes on a sunny day it began even to be pleasant and genial, and a greenness grew over those brown beds, which, freshening daily, suggested the thought that Hope traversed them at night, and left each morning brighter traces of her steps.
Again I remarked his lameness and the soft padding sound of his footfall, and standing up in my place, I saw his feet as he went out.
If Irwine had said nothing, I shouldn't have thought half so much of Hetty as of Meg's lameness.
But we decided to undertake it, though, for my own part, I felt little prepared to encounter its fatigues, shivering and burning by turns with the ague and fever; for I know not how else to describe the alternate sensations I experienced, and suffering not a little from the lameness which afflicted me.
His lameness prevented him from taking much exercise; but a mind of usefulness and ingenuity seemed to furnish him with constant employment within.
A horse so treated would develop a slight lameness, which would be put down to a strain in exercise or a touch of rheumatism, but never to foul play.
It was not so much his great height that marked him, for the "natives" were easily singled out by their lank longitude from the stockier foreign breed: it was the careless powerful look he had, in spite of a lameness checking each step like the jerk of a chain.
In the old mythology, mythologists observe, defects are ascribed to divine natures, as lameness to Vulcan, blindness to Cupid, and the like, --to signify exuberances.
Philip felt that his lameness began to irritate him.
Michael was not destined to permanent lameness, although in after-years his shoulder was always tender, and, on occasion, when the weather was damp, he was compelled to ease it with a slight limp.
The Wolf, coming up, inquired the cause of his lameness.