lamentation


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lam·en·ta·tion

 (lăm′ən-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of lamenting.
2. A lament.
3. Lamentations(used with a sing. verb) See Table at Bible.

lamentation

(ˌlæmɛnˈteɪʃən)
n
1. a lament; expression of sorrow
2. the act of lamenting

lam•en•ta•tion

(ˌlæm ənˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of or instance of lamenting; lament.
2. Lamentations, (used with a sing. v.) a book of the Bible, traditionally ascribed to Jeremiah.
[1325–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lamentation - a cry of sorrow and grieflamentation - a cry of sorrow and grief; "their pitiful laments could be heard throughout the ward"
complaint - (formerly) a loud cry (or repeated cries) of pain or rage or sorrow
2.lamentation - the passionate and demonstrative activity of expressing grief
activity - any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
expression, reflexion, reflection, manifestation - expression without words; "tears are an expression of grief"; "the pulse is a reflection of the heart's condition"

lamentation

noun sorrow, grief, weeping, mourning, moan, grieving, sobbing, keening, lament, wailing, dirge, plaint, ululation It was time for mourning and lamentation.
Translations
عَويل، نَحيب، نُواح
naříkání
jeremiadeklagesang
siránkozás
harmatölur, sorgarkvein
nariekanie

lamentation

[ˌlæmənˈteɪʃən] Nlamentación f

lamentation

[ˌlæmɛnˈteɪʃən] nlamentation f
It was a time for mourning and lamentation → L'heure était au deuil et à la lamentation.

lamentation

n(Weh)klage f; (= act)Klagen nt, → Jammern nt; (= poem, song)Klagelied nt; he cried out with lamentationer brach in lautes Wehklagen aus

lamentation

[ˌlæmənˈteɪʃn] n (frm) → lamento
there was much lamentation over the news that the president had died → la notizia della morte del presidente ha causato profonda afflizione

lament

(ləˈment) verb
to feel or express regret for. We all lament his death; He sat lamenting over his past failures.
noun
1. a poem or piece of music which laments something. This song is a lament for those killed in battle.
2. a show of grief, regret etc. I'm not going to sit listening to her laments all day.
ˌlamenˈtation (lӕmən-) noun
(an) act of lamenting. the lamentations of the widow.
References in classic literature ?
Some Frogs frequenting the pool heard his lamentation, and said, "What would you do if you had to live here always as we do, when you make such a fuss about a mere fall into the water?
Of the Choric part the Parode is the first undivided utterance of the Chorus: the Stasimon is a Choric ode without anapaests or trochaic tetrameters: the Commos is a joint lamentation of Chorus and actors.
How much does this custom among the Indian woman of repairing to the hilltops in the night, and pouring forth their wailings for the dead, call to mind the beautiful and affecting passage of Scripture, "In Rama was there a voice heard, lamentation, and weeping, and great mourning, Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted, because they are not.
The mutilated and almost undistinguishable bodies were placed in rows upon the ground, in the midst of the assemblage; and the scene of heart-rending anguish and lamentation that ensued would have confounded those who insist on Indian stoicism.
By his side stood a man with a native knife dancing around and singing - all through the place were sounds of wailing and lamentation, and in front of his hut the King was lying, with an empty bottle by his side, drunk and motionless.
Those who dream of the banquet, wake to lamentation and sorrow.
The words were connected by no regular continuation, but as one ceased another took up the eulogy, or lamentation, whichever it might be called, and gave vent to her emotions in such language as was suggested by her feelings and the occasion.
Creeping stealthily and keeping well in the cover of other huts, he approached that from which rose the sounds of lamentation.
Amidst all my Lamentations for her (and violent you may suppose they were) I yet received some consolation in the reflection of my having paid every attention to her, that could be offered, in her illness.
A proof of the infallibility of the foregoing receipt, in the lamentations of the widow; with other suitable decorations of death, such as physicians, &c.
Thus passes the Abyssinian winter, a dreadful season, in which the whole kingdom languishes with numberless diseases, an affliction which, however grievous, is yet equalled by the clouds of grasshoppers, which fly in such numbers from the desert, that the sun is hid and the sky darkened; whenever this plague appears, nothing is seen through the whole region but the most ghastly consternation, or heard but the most piercing lamentations, for wherever they fall, that unhappy place is laid waste and ruined; they leave not one blade of grass, nor any hopes of a harvest.
Without listening the least in the world to the lamentations of M.