lames


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Related to lames: lams

lame 1

 (lām)
adj. lam·er, lam·est
1. Disabled so that movement, especially walking, is difficult or impossible: Lame from the accident, he walked with a cane. A lame wing kept the bird from flying.
2. Marked by pain or rigidness: a lame back.
3. Weak or ineffectual: a lame attempt to apologize.
4.
a. Informal Dull or unsatisfactory: That movie was so lame!
b. Slang Socially inappropriate; foolish.
tr.v. lamed, lam·ing, lames
To cause to become lame; cripple.

[Middle English, from Old English lama.]

lame′ly adv.
lame′ness n.

lame 2

 (lām)
n.
A thin metal plate, especially one of the overlapping steel plates in medieval armor.

[French, from Old French, from Latin lāmina, thin plate.]

la·mé

 (lă-mā′)
n.
A shiny fabric woven with metallic threads, often of gold or silver.

[French, spangled, laminated, lamé, from Old French lame, thin metal plate; see lame2.]
References in classic literature ?
It was a thousand times more fun to haul real chips for old lame Susie's real fire than to drag painted blocks along the banquette on Esplanade Street!
By that time I was going so lame with the pain that at last he saw it, and called out, "Well, here's a go
Up by Astolat there was a chapel where the Virgin had once appeared to a girl who used to herd geese around there -- the girl said so herself -- and they built the chapel upon that spot and hung a picture in it representing the occur- rence -- a picture which you would think it dangerous for a sick person to approach; whereas, on the con- trary, thousands of the lame and the sick came and prayed before it every year and went away whole and sound; and even the well could look upon it and live.
He had a cow with a calf too, and an old lame horse-twenty-five years of age--and chickens, and pigeons, and two lambs, and many other animals.
Under favour, uncle,'' said the Jester, ``that were still somewhat on the bow-hand of fair justice; for it was no fault of Fangs that he was lame and could not gather the herd, but the fault of those that struck off two of his fore-claws, an operation for which, if the poor fellow had been consulted, he would scarce have given his voice.
The impression was, A KING LIFTING UP A LAME BEGGAR FROM THE EARTH.
That tiger limps because he was born lame, as everyone knows.
I sought him long from place to place, but it was only to-day, when I expected it least, that I came across him, as much irritated with me as ever"-- So saying the tailor went on to relate the story of the lame man and the barber, which has already been told.