lammergeier

(redirected from lammergeiers)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to lammergeiers: Lamb vulture

lam·mer·gei·er

also lam·mer·gey·er  (lăm′ər-gī′ər)
n.
A large vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) found in mountainous regions of southern Europe, Asia, and Africa, having stiff feathers that extend below the beak to form a beard and, unlike other vultures, a feathered head. Also called bearded vulture, ossifrage.

[German Lämmergeier : Lämmer, genitive pl. of Lamm, lamb (from Middle High German lamp, from Old High German lamb) + Geier, vulture (from Middle High German gīr, from Old High German).]

lammergeier

(ˈlæməˌɡaɪə) or

lammergeyer

n
(Animals) a rare vulture, Gypaetus barbatus, of S Europe, Africa, and Asia, with dark wings, a pale breast, and black feathers around the bill: family Accipitridae (hawks). Also called: bearded vulture or ossifrage (archaic)
[C19: from German Lämmergeier, from Lämmer lambs + Geier vulture]

lam•mer•gei•er

or lam•mer•gey•er or lam•mer•geir

(ˈlæm ərˌgaɪ ər, -ˌgaɪər)

n.
a large, eaglelike Eurasian vulture, Gypaëtus barbatus, with a tuft of bristlelike feathers below the bill.
[1810–20; < German Lämmergeier=Lämmer, pl. of Lamm lamb + Geier vulture]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lammergeier - the largest Eurasian bird of preylammergeier - the largest Eurasian bird of prey; having black feathers hanging around the bill
Old World vulture - any of several large vultures of Africa and Eurasia
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Two three-month-old lammergeiers are being reintroduced into a cave specially prepared for them on a 2,000-metre-high cliff.
The programme to reintroduce the lammergeier began at the end of the 1970s, when scientists successfully bred chicks from captive birds in Austria, In 1987, birds bred in Haute Savoie were released and were later seen hundreds of kilometres from their new home.
Biblical birds threatened with extinction include such species as the heron or egret, eagles and vultures and kites, buzzards and lammergeiers, griffon vultures and migrating quail.