languidness


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lan·guid

 (lăng′gwĭd)
adj.
1.
a. Lacking energy or disinclined to exert effort; listless: feeling languid from a fever.
b. Slow-moving or weak in force: languid breezes.
2. Showing little or no vitality or animation: languid prose.
3. Characterized by or conducive to indolence or inactivity: a languid afternoon.

[French languide, from Latin languidus, from languēre, to be languid; see slēg- in Indo-European roots.]

lan′guid·ly adv.
lan′guid·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

languidness

noun
A deficiency in mental and physical alertness and activity:
Translations

languidness

[ˈlæŋgwɪdnɪs] Nlanguidez f

languidness

nTrägheit f; (of gesture)Mattigkeit f; (of manner)Lässigkeit f; the languidness of her voiceihre müde Stimme

languidness

n. languidez, decaimiento.
References in periodicals archive ?
They went beyond the vast blueness of Indian skies, the tranquility of its lakes and the golden languidness of its deserts, beyond the breathtakingly dense foliage with their colourful birds and strange night-sounds.
One feels the languidness of the era as the region stumbles into the early 1800s and the beginnings of modernity.
The Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness (PILL) (Pennebaker, 1997) measures the frequency that general physical symptoms and sensations associated with stress are experienced.
The language creates simultaneous tension and languidness that challenge readers while remaining accessible.
Talking to KUNA after his participation in the first constitutional meeting for the GCC Education Ministers Committee in Doha today, Al-Issa referred to the languidness of developing curricula in the member states.
For its sheer lackadaisicalness and languidness, the beleaguered city resultantly now sits on a ticking live powder-keg of bloodshed and holocaust, which one even shudders to think of the mayhem it would cause all around in the deeply-stricken city when it explodes.
It displays a languidness (hukut, peten, 'to remember) pertaining to the absence of a friend, a relative, or a lover.
Languidness develops as a central idea in Decadent poetry as a refuge from an increasingly frenzied materialistic age.
What begins with paleness and languidness progresses to something she does not think she can recover from, for she tells her caretaker, Juno, "I know I cannot live long" (32).
Fatigue (also called exhaustion, tiredness, lethargy, languidness, languor, lassitude, and listlessness) is a subjective feeling of tiredness which is distinct from weakness, and has a gradual onset.
With it, we have long passed the stage of laziness, languidness or insincerity.