languor


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lan·guor

 (lăng′gər, lăng′ər)
n.
1. Lack of physical or mental energy; listlessness: "the languor of the men, induced by the heat" (Herman Melville). See Synonyms at lethargy.
2. A dreamy, lazy, or sensual quality, as of expression: "the clarity of her complexion, the length and languor of her eyelashes" (Jhumpa Lahiri).
3. Oppressive stillness, especially of the air: the languor of a hot July afternoon.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin, from languēre, to be languid; see languish.]

lan′guor·ous adj.
lan′guor·ous·ly adv.
lan′guor·ous·ness n.

languor

(ˈlæŋɡə)
n
1. physical or mental laziness or weariness
2. a feeling of dreaminess and relaxation
3. oppressive silence or stillness
[C14 langour, via Old French from Latin languor, from languēre to languish; the modern spelling is directly from Latin]

lan•guor

(ˈlæŋ gər)

n.
1. lack of energy or vitality.
2. lack of spirit or interest.
[1250–1300; < Old French < Latin languor]

languor

- Any distressed condition, such as illness, sorrow, fatigue, etc.
See also related terms for illness.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Switch to new thesaurus
Noun1.languor - a relaxed comfortable feeling
easiness, relaxation - a feeling of refreshing tranquility and an absence of tension or worry; "the easiness we feel when sleeping"
2.languor - a feeling of lack of interest or energy
apathy - an absence of emotion or enthusiasm
3.languor - inactivitylanguor - inactivity; showing an unusual lack of energy; "the general appearance of sluggishness alarmed his friends"
inertia, inactiveness, inactivity - a disposition to remain inactive or inert; "he had to overcome his inertia and get back to work"

languor

noun
2. (Literary) relaxation, laziness, sloth, drowsiness, sleepiness, indolence, dreaminess, lotus-eating She savoured the pleasant languor, the dreamy tranquillity.
3. stillness, silence, calm, hush, lull, oppressiveness a sleepy haven of rural languor

languor

noun
A deficiency in mental and physical alertness and activity:
Translations

languor

[ˈlæŋgəʳ] Nlanguidez f

languor

[ˈlæŋgər] nlangueur f

languor

n (= indolence)Trägheit f, → Schläfrigkeit f; (= weakness)Mattigkeit f, → Schlappheit f; (emotional) → Stumpfheit f, → Apathie f

languor

[ˈlæŋgəʳ] n (liter) → languore m
References in classic literature ?
His eyes gathered in and reflected the light and languor of the summer day.
The wine of life, henceforth to be presented to her lips, must be indeed rich, delicious, and exhilarating, in its chased and golden beaker, or else leave an inevitable and weary languor, after the lees of bitterness wherewith she had been drugged, as with a cordial of intensest potency.
The tranced ship indolently rolls; the drowsy trade winds blow; everything resolves you into languor.
She opened her eyes in a state of dreamy, delicious languor, such as one who has long been bearing a heavy load, and now feels it gone, and would rest.
She had been particularly unwell, however, suffering from headache to a degree, which made her aunt declare, that had the ball taken place, she did not think Jane could have attended it; and it was charity to impute some of her unbecoming indifference to the languor of illhealth.
Although he could not fail to notice the languor in her face and the listlessness of all her movements, he was relieved to find that she met him with perfect composure.
Micawber put on her brown gloves, and assumed a genteel languor.
He was still a pale young gentleman, and had a certain conquered languor about him in the midst of his spirits and briskness, that did not seem indicative of natural strength.
Yet she had just sufficiently that touch of languor which puts one at one's ease, though indeed it was rather the languor of waiting for what was going to happen than the weariness of experience gone by.
The rocks of the Spy-glass re-echoed it a score of times; the whole troop of marsh-birds rose again, darkening heaven, with a simultaneous whirr; and long after that death yell was still ringing in my brain, silence had re- established its empire, and only the rustle of the redescending birds and the boom of the distant surges disturbed the languor of the afternoon.
This has ever been the fate of energy in security; it takes to art and to eroticism, and then come languor and decay.
After supper I exhibited the same marks of languor as on the preceding evening; but this time, as I yielded to fatigue, or as if I had become familiarized with danger, I dragged myself toward my bed, let my robe fall, and lay down.