larboard


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lar·board

 (lär′bərd) Nautical
n.
See port2.
adj.
On the port side.

[Alteration (influenced by starboard) of Middle English laddebord : perhaps laden, to load; see load + borde, side of a ship; see starboard.]

larboard

(ˈlɑːbəd)
n, adj
(Nautical Terms) nautical a former word for port2
[C14 laddeborde (changed to larboard by association with starboard), from laden to load + borde board]

port1

(pɔrt, poʊrt)

n.
1. a city, town, or other place where ships load or unload.
2. a place along a coast in which ships may take refuge from storms; harbor.
3. Also called port of entry.
a. any place where imported goods may be received into a country subject to inspection by customs officials.
b. any place where travelers or immigrants may enter a country.
4. a geographical area that forms a harbor.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English < Latin portus harbor, haven; akin to ford]
syn: See harbor.

port2

(pɔrt, poʊrt)

n.
1. the left-hand side of a vessel or aircraft, facing forward.
adj.
2. of, pertaining to, or located on the left side of a vessel or aircraft.
v.t., v.i.
3. to turn or shift to the port, or left, side.
[1570–80; perhaps identical with port1]

port3

(pɔrt, poʊrt)

n.
a very sweet, usu. dark red, fortified wine, orig. from Portugal.
[1695–95; earlier Oporto wine, (Port) OPort wine < Portuguese Oporto Oporto, through which Portuguese wines are shipped]

port4

(pɔrt, poʊrt)

n.
1. an opening in the side or other exterior part of a ship for admitting air and light or for taking on cargo. Compare porthole (def. 1).
2. an aperture in the surface of a cylinder, as in machinery, for the passage of steam, air, water, etc.
3. a small aperture in an armored vehicle, aircraft, or fortification through which a gun can be fired or a camera directed.
4. a data connection in a computer to which a peripheral device or a transmission line from a remote terminal can be attached.
5. Chiefly Scot. a gate or portal, as to a town or fortress.
v.t.
6. to create a new version of (an application program) to run on a different hardware platform (sometimes fol. by over).
[before 950; Middle English, Old English < Latin porta gate; akin to portus port1]

port5

(pɔrt, poʊrt)

v.t.
to carry (a rifle or other weapon) in the port arms position.
[1560–70; < French porter < Latin portāre to carry; see fare]

Port.

1. Portugal.
2. Portuguese.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.larboard - the left side of a ship or aircraft to someone who is aboard and facing the bow or noselarboard - the left side of a ship or aircraft to someone who is aboard and facing the bow or nose
side - an extended outer surface of an object; "he turned the box over to examine the bottom side"; "they painted all four sides of the house"
starboard - the right side of a ship or aircraft to someone who is aboard and facing the bow or nose
Adj.1.larboard - located on the left side of a ship or aircraft
left - being or located on or directed toward the side of the body to the west when facing north; "my left hand"; "left center field"; "the left bank of a river is bank on your left side when you are facing downstream"
Translations

larboard

[ˈlɑːbəd]
A. ADJde babor
B. Nbabor m

larboard

(old)
adjBackbord-; larboard sideBackbordseite f
nBackbord nt
References in classic literature ?
The boats were here hailed, to tow the whale on the larboard side, where fluke chains and other necessaries were already prepared for securing him.
When a piece of timber was intended for the larboard side, it would be marked thus--"L.
the larboard watch came gaping and stretching out of their den, with the everlasting formula: "Aye-aye, sir
The reef on which we had struck was close in under the southwest end of Mull, off a little isle they call Earraid, which lay low and black upon the larboard.
Consequently, the larboard watch was ordered to lay in his pole.
Sometimes I would put up my sail, and then my business was only to steer, while the ladies gave me a gale with their fans; and, when they were weary, some of their pages would blow my sail forward with their breath, while I showed my art by steering starboard or larboard as I pleased.
It hit her larboard side and glanced off in an inky jet that rolled away to seaward, an unfolding torrent of Black Smoke, from which the ironclad drove clear.
Uncle Alec took no notice of her fear, but patiently instructed her in the art of steering, till she was so absorbed in remembering which was starboard and which larboard, that she forgot to say "OW