largeness


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

large

(lärj)
adj. larg·er, larg·est
1. Of greater than average size, extent, quantity, or amount; big.
2. Of greater than average scope, breadth, or capacity; comprehensive.
3. Important; significant: had a large role in the negotiations; a large producer of paper goods.
4.
a. Understanding and tolerant; liberal: a large and generous spirit.
b. Of great magnitude or intensity; grand: "a rigid resistance to the large emotions" (Stephen Koch).
5.
a. Pretentious; boastful. Used of speech or manners.
b. Obsolete Gross; coarse. Used of speech or language.
6. Nautical Favorable. Used of a wind.
n. pl. large
Slang A thousand dollars: bought a speedboat for 50 large.
Idioms:
at large
1. Not in confinement or captivity; at liberty: a convict still at large.
2. As a whole; in general: the country at large.
3. Representing a nation, state, or district as a whole. Often used in combination: councilor-at-large.
4. Not assigned to a particular country. Often used in combination: ambassador-at-large.
5. At length; copiously.
live large
To indulge freely in a luxury or luxuries: For a few years, the nation lived large on its new-found oil wealth.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin largus, generous.]

large′ness n.
Synonyms: large, big, great
These adjectives mean being notably above the average in size or magnitude: a large sum of money; a big red barn; a great ocean liner.
Antonym: small
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.largeness - the capacity to understand a broad range of topics; "a teacher must have a breadth of knowledge of the subject"; "a man distinguished by the largeness and scope of his views"
intelligence - the ability to comprehend; to understand and profit from experience
capaciousness, roominess - intellectual breadth; "the very capaciousness of the idea meant that agreement on fundamentals was unnecessary"; "his unselfishness gave him great intellectual roominess"
2.largeness - large or extensive in breadth or importance or comprehensiveness; "the might have repercussions of unimaginable largeness"; "the very extensiveness of his power was a temptation to abuse it"
magnitude - relative importance; "a problem of the first magnitude"
3.largeness - the property of having a relatively great sizelargeness - the property of having a relatively great size
size - the physical magnitude of something (how big it is); "a wolf is about the size of a large dog"
ampleness - the property of impressive largeness in size; "he admired the ampleness of its proportions"
bulkiness, massiveness - an unwieldy largeness
immenseness, immensity, sizeableness, vastness, enormousness, grandness, greatness, wideness - unusual largeness in size or extent or number
commodiousness, spaciousness, capaciousness, roominess - spatial largeness and extensiveness (especially inside a building); "the capaciousness of Santa's bag astounded the child"; "roominess in this size car is always a compromise"; "his new office lacked the spaciousness that he had become accustomed to"
voluminosity, voluminousness, fullness - greatness of volume
giantism, gigantism - excessive largeness of stature
littleness, smallness - the property of having a relatively small size
4.largeness - the quality of being pretentious (behaving or speaking in such a manner as to create a false appearance of great importance or worth)
unnaturalness - the quality of being unnatural or not based on natural principles
ostentation - pretentious or showy or vulgar display

largeness

noun
The quality or state of being large in amount, extent, or importance:
Translations
كِبَر
velikost
storhed
stærî; mikilleiki

largeness

[ˈlɑːdʒnɪs] N [of person, thing] → gran tamaño m; [of group, family] → lo numeroso
the largeness of the sumlo cuantioso or grande de la suma

largeness

n
(= big size)Größe f, → Umfang m; (of meal)Reichlichkeit f; (of list)Länge f
(= extent: of interests, power) → Bedeutung f, → Umfang m
(old: = generosity) → Großzügigkeit f

largeness

[ˈlɑːdʒnɪs] ngrandezza

large

(ˈlaːdʒ) adjective
great in size, amount etc; not small. a large number of people; a large house; a large family; This house is too large for two people.
ˈlargely adverb
mainly; to a great extent. This success was largely due to her efforts; Our methods have been largely successful.
ˈlargeness noun
at large
1. (of prisoners etc) free. Despite the efforts of the police, the escaped prisoner is still at large.
2. in general. the country / the public at large.
References in classic literature ?
At this dim inceptive stage of the day Tess seemed to Clare to exhibit a dignified largeness both of disposition and physique, an almost regnant power, possibly because he knew that at that preternatural time hardly any woman so well endowed in person as she was likely to be walking in the open air within the boundaries of his horizon; very few in all England.
But no other Dialogue of Plato has the same largeness of view and the same perfection of style; no other shows an equal knowledge of the world, or contains more of those thoughts which are new as well as old, and not of one age only but of all.
Tashtego's long, lean, sable hair, his high cheek bones, and black rounding eyes --for an Indian, Oriental in their largeness, but Antarctic in their glittering expression --all this sufficiently proclaimed him an inheritor of the unvitiated blood of those proud warrior hunters, who, in quest of the great New England moose, had scoured, bow in hand, the aboriginal forests of the main.
She lacked the easy largeness of Martin and could not rise superior to her environment.
Not a man, not a sail, upon the sea; the very largeness of the view increased the sense of solitude.
cried Passepartout, startled at the largeness of the sum.
For aviaries, I like them not, except they be of that largeness as they may be turfed, and have living plants and bushes set in them; that the birds may have more scope, and natural nesting, and that no foulness appear in the floor of the aviary.
Far off in the bending sky was the pearly light; and she felt the largeness of the world and the manifold wakings of men to labor and endurance.
The young lady whom Mr Nightingale had intended for his son was a near neighbour of his brother, and an acquaintance of his niece; and in reality it was upon the account of his projected match that he was now come to town; not, indeed, to forward, but to dissuade his brother from a purpose which he conceived would inevitably ruin his nephew; for he foresaw no other event from a union with Miss Harris, notwithstanding the largeness of her fortune, as neither her person nor mind seemed to him to promise any kind of matrimonial felicity: for she was very tall, very thin, very ugly, very affected, very silly, and very ill-natured.
And while the whole face was the incarnation of fierceness and strength, the primal melancholy from which he suffered seemed to greaten the lines of mouth and eye and brow, seemed to give a largeness and completeness which otherwise the face would have lacked.
Colbert, minus grandeur of person, less largeness of heart, resembled Fouquet in many points.
He was clearly aghast at the largeness of the sum, and thought a far smaller amount should have been tried first.