larger


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Related to larger: larger than life

large

(lärj)
adj. larg·er, larg·est
1. Of greater than average size, extent, quantity, or amount; big.
2. Of greater than average scope, breadth, or capacity; comprehensive.
3. Important; significant: had a large role in the negotiations; a large producer of paper goods.
4.
a. Understanding and tolerant; liberal: a large and generous spirit.
b. Of great magnitude or intensity; grand: "a rigid resistance to the large emotions" (Stephen Koch).
5.
a. Pretentious; boastful. Used of speech or manners.
b. Obsolete Gross; coarse. Used of speech or language.
6. Nautical Favorable. Used of a wind.
n. pl. large
Slang A thousand dollars: bought a speedboat for 50 large.
Idioms:
at large
1. Not in confinement or captivity; at liberty: a convict still at large.
2. As a whole; in general: the country at large.
3. Representing a nation, state, or district as a whole. Often used in combination: councilor-at-large.
4. Not assigned to a particular country. Often used in combination: ambassador-at-large.
5. At length; copiously.
live large
To indulge freely in a luxury or luxuries: For a few years, the nation lived large on its new-found oil wealth.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin largus, generous.]

large′ness n.
Synonyms: large, big, great
These adjectives mean being notably above the average in size or magnitude: a large sum of money; a big red barn; a great ocean liner.
Antonym: small
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.larger - large or big relative to something elselarger - large or big relative to something else
big, large - above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a large city"; "set out for the big city"; "a large sum"; "a big (or large) barn"; "a large family"; "big businesses"; "a big expenditure"; "a large number of newspapers"; "a big group of scientists"; "large areas of the world"

larger

adjective
Much more than half:
Translations

larger

, largest
a., comp., sup. of large, más grande; mayor;
the tumor is ___ nowel tumor está más grande ahora.
References in classic literature ?
The beautiful, kind eyes are larger, and in them lies an expression that saddens one, although it is not sad itself.
It was larger and more imposing and its minister was better paid.
For there were a number of canoes filled with the goods of the party, while the members themselves occupied a larger one with their personal baggage.
I was lying in a little room, scarcely larger than the bed that held me, and the window-shade at my head was flapping softly in a warm wind.
While the husbandman shrank back from the dangerous passes, within the safer boundaries of the more ancient settlements, armies larger than those that had often disposed of the scepters of the mother countries, were seen to bury themselves in these forests, whence they rarely returned but in skeleton bands, that were haggard with care or dejected by defeat.
You once before acted as our escort--it was for a short but a happy time--will you accept a larger trust?
Thither, too, thronged the plebeian classes as freely as their betters, and in larger number.
It might be difficult -- and it was so -- to conceive how he should exist hereafter, so earthly and sensuous did he seem; but surely his existence here, admitting that it was to terminate with his last breath, had been not unkindly given; with no higher moral responsibilities than the beasts of the field, but with a larger scope of enjoyment than theirs, and with all their blessed immunity from the dreariness and duskiness of age.
When school hours were over, he was even the companion and playmate of the larger boys; and on holiday afternoons would convoy some of the smaller ones home, who happened to have pretty sisters, or good housewives for mothers, noted for the comforts of the cupboard.
He is somewhat larger than the Huzza Porpoise, but much of the same general make.
This august hump, if I mistake not, rises over one of the larger vertebrae, and is, therefore, in some sort, the outer convex mould of it.
Sir Francis Head, an English traveler and a Governor-General of Canada, tells us that "in both the northern and southern hemispheres of the New World, Nature has not only outlined her works on a larger scale, but has painted the whole picture with brighter and more costly colors than she used in delineating and in beautifying the Old World.