lass


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

lass

 (lăs)
n.
1. A girl or young woman.
2. A sweetheart.

[Middle English las, probably of Scandinavian origin.]

lass

(læs)
n
1. a girl or young woman
2. informal a familiar form of address for any female
[C13: origin uncertain]

lass

(læs)

n.
1. a girl or young woman, esp. one who is unmarried.
2. a female sweetheart.
[1250–1300; Middle English las, lasse, of uncertain orig.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lass - a girl or young woman who is unmarriedlass - a girl or young woman who is unmarried
bobby-socker, bobbysoxer - an adolescent girl wearing bobby socks (common in the 1940s)
fille, girl, miss, missy, young lady, young woman - a young woman; "a young lady of 18"
Lolita - a sexually precocious young girl

lass

noun girl, young woman, miss, bird (slang), maiden, chick (slang), maid, damsel, colleen (Irish), lassie (informal), wench (facetious) She's a Lancashire lass from Longton, near Preston.
Translations
فَتَاةٌفَتاة صَغيرَه
děvčedívka
tøspige
tyttö
djevojka
kislány
stúlka
少女
아가씨
meičameitēns
flicka
เด็กผู้หญิง
thiếu nữ

lass

[læs] N (esp Scot) → muchacha f, chica f, chavala f (Sp) , cabra f (Chile) , piba f (S. Cone) , chamaca f (CAm, Mex) ; (= country lass) → moza f, zagala f

lass

[ˈlæs] nfille f, jeune femme f
Anne is a Lancashire lass → Anne est une fille du Lancashire., Anne est une jeune femme du Lancashire.

lass

n(junges) Mädchen, Mädel nt (dial); (= country lass)Mädchen ntvom Land; (= sweetheart)Freundin f, → Schatz m

lass

[læs] n (esp in Northern Britain) → ragazza

lass

(lӕs) noun
a girl.

lass

فَتَاةٌ dívka tøs Mädchen κοπέλα muchacha tyttö jeune fille djevojka ragazza 少女 아가씨 meisje jente dziewczyna moça, rapariga девушка flicka เด็กผู้หญิง genç kız thiếu nữ 少女
References in classic literature ?
She was a booming lass of fresh eighteen; plump as a partridge; ripe and melting and rosy-cheeked as one of her father's peaches, and universally famed, not merely for her beauty, but her vast expectations.
And at the zenith of his fame, how he would suddenly appear at the old village and stalk into church, brown and weather-beaten, in his black velvet doublet and trunks, his great jack-boots, his crimson sash, his belt bristling with horse-pistols, his crime-rusted cut- lass at his side, his slouch hat with waving plumes, his black flag unfurled, with the skull and crossbones on it, and hear with swelling ecstasy the whisperings, "It's Tom Sawyer the Pirate
Well lass," replied a voice within, "give it her if she's a beggar.
I remember the master, before he fell into a doze, stroking her bonny hair - it pleased him rarely to see her gentle - and saying, 'Why canst thou not always be a good lass, Cathy?
Tuppence', an' mother she began fumblin' in her pocket an' she says to me, `Martha, tha's brought me thy wages like a good lass, an' I've got four places to put every penny, but I'm just goin' to take tuppence out of it to buy that child a skippin'-rope,' an' she bought one an' here it is.
Osgood as now is, and a fine handsome lass she was--eh, you can't think-- they pretend this young lass is like her, but that's the way wi' people as don't know what come before 'em.
And now,'' said Locksley, ``I will crave your Grace's permission to plant such a mark as is used in the North Country; and welcome every brave yeoman who shall try a shot at it to win a smile from the bonny lass he loves best.
Here is a Lancashire lass, the daughter of a common pitman.
His good-humor made the people laugh also and crowd round his cart closely, shouting uproariously when some buxom lass submitted to be kissed.
That won't harm ye, my pretty, an' it may make poor Geordie gladsome to have so trim a lass sittin' on his lap.
I have no other master but you; so- a pretty little lass, my faith, is that SOUBRETTE
An' if thee'st set thy heart on a lass as'll bring thee nought and waste all, when thee mightst ha' them as 'ud make a man on thee, I'll say nought, now thy feyther's dead an' drownded, for I'm no better nor an old haft when the blade's gone.