lasso


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

las·so

 (lăs′ō, lă-so͞o′)
n. pl. las·sos or las·soes
A long rope with a running noose at one end, used especially to catch horses and cattle. Also called lariat.
tr.v. las·soed, las·so·ing, las·sos or las·soes
To catch, tie, or attach with or as if with a lasso.

[Spanish lazo, from Vulgar Latin *laceum, noose; see lace.]

las′so·er n.

lasso

(læˈsuː; ˈlæsəʊ)
n, pl -sos or -soes
a long rope or thong with a running noose at one end, used (esp in America) for roping horses, cattle, etc; lariat
vb, -sos, -soes, -soing or -soed
(tr) to catch with or as if with a lasso
[C19: from Spanish lazo, ultimately from Latin laqueus noose]
lasˈsoer n

las•so

(ˈlæs oʊ, læˈsu)

n., pl. -sos, -soes, n.
1. a long rope or line of hide or other material with a running noose at one end, used for roping horses, cattle, etc.
v.t.
2. to catch with or as if with a lasso.
[1760–70; < Sp lazo < Latin laqueus noose, bond; compare lace]
las′so•er, n.

lasso


Past participle: lassoed
Gerund: lassoing

Imperative
lasso
lasso
Present
I lasso
you lasso
he/she/it lassos/lassoes
we lasso
you lasso
they lasso
Preterite
I lassoing
you lassoing
he/she/it lassoing
we lassoing
you lassoing
they lassoing
Present Continuous
I am lassoing
you are lassoing
he/she/it is lassoing
we are lassoing
you are lassoing
they are lassoing
Present Perfect
I have lassoed
you have lassoed
he/she/it has lassoed
we have lassoed
you have lassoed
they have lassoed
Past Continuous
I was lassoing
you were lassoing
he/she/it was lassoing
we were lassoing
you were lassoing
they were lassoing
Past Perfect
I had lassoed
you had lassoed
he/she/it had lassoed
we had lassoed
you had lassoed
they had lassoed
Future
I will lasso
you will lasso
he/she/it will lasso
we will lasso
you will lasso
they will lasso
Future Perfect
I will have lassoed
you will have lassoed
he/she/it will have lassoed
we will have lassoed
you will have lassoed
they will have lassoed
Future Continuous
I will be lassoing
you will be lassoing
he/she/it will be lassoing
we will be lassoing
you will be lassoing
they will be lassoing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been lassoing
you have been lassoing
he/she/it has been lassoing
we have been lassoing
you have been lassoing
they have been lassoing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been lassoing
you will have been lassoing
he/she/it will have been lassoing
we will have been lassoing
you will have been lassoing
they will have been lassoing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been lassoing
you had been lassoing
he/she/it had been lassoing
we had been lassoing
you had been lassoing
they had been lassoing
Conditional
I would lasso
you would lasso
he/she/it would lasso
we would lasso
you would lasso
they would lasso
Past Conditional
I would have lassoed
you would have lassoed
he/she/it would have lassoed
we would have lassoed
you would have lassoed
they would have lassoed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lasso - Belgian composer (1532-1594)
2.lasso - a long noosed rope used to catch animalslasso - a long noosed rope used to catch animals
running noose, slip noose, noose - a loop formed in a cord or rope by means of a slipknot; it binds tighter as the cord or rope is pulled
rope - a strong line
Verb1.lasso - catch with a lasso; "rope cows"
capture, catch, get - succeed in catching or seizing, especially after a chase; "We finally got the suspect"; "Did you catch the thief?"
Translations
وَهَق: حَبْل بِطَرَفِه أُنْشوطَهيُمْسِك بالحَبْل
lasozalasovatchytit lasem
fange med lassolasso
lassolassota
lasszólasszózmeglasszóz
snarasnara, slöngvivaîur
kilpinėlasaspagauti su lasu
ķert ar lasolaso
chytiť lasomlaso
kementkementle tutmak/yakalamak

lasso

[læˈsuː]
A. N (lassos or lassoes (pl)) → lazo m
B. VTlazar, coger con el lazo

lasso

[læˈsuː]
nlasso m
vtattraper au lasso

lasso

n pl <-(e)s> → Lasso m or nt
vtmit dem Lasso einfangen

lasso

[læˈsuː]
1. nlazo m inv, laccio
2. vtprendere al lazo or al laccio

lasso

(lӕˈsuː) plural lasˈso(e)s noun
a long rope with a loop which tightens when the rope is pulled, used for catching wild horses etc.
verbpresent tense lasˈsoes: past tense, past participle lasˈsoed
to catch with a lasso. The cowboy lassoed the horse.
References in classic literature ?
Fuchs told me everything I wanted to know: how he had lost his ear in a Wyoming blizzard when he was a stage-driver, and how to throw a lasso.
In the midst of this consternation, Queequeg dropped deftly to his knees, and crawling under the path of the boom, whipped hold of a rope, secured one end to the bulwarks, and then flinging the other like a lasso, caught it round the boom as it swept over his head, and at the next jerk, the spar was that way trapped, and all was safe.
I slipped my lasso from the horn of my saddle, and grasped the coil in my right hand.
One must have a steel hook, on another rope--a very useful thing; for when one is ascending and comes to a low bluff which is yet too high for the ladder, he swings this rope aloft like a lasso, the hook catches at the top of the bluff, and then the tourist climbs the rope, hand over hand--being always particular to try and forget that if the hook gives way he will never stop falling till he arrives in some part of Switzerland where they are not expecting him.
I practiced this exercise, and as nature has endowed me with some faculties, at this day I can throw the lasso with any man in the world.
Ali suddenly cast aside his chibouque, drew the lasso from his pocket, threw it so skilfully as to catch the forelegs of the near horse in its triple fold, and suffered himself to be dragged on for a few steps by the violence of the shock, then the animal fell over on the pole, which snapped, and therefore prevented the other horse from pursuing its way.
Gay life at Monterey Mexican horsemen A bold dragoon Use of the lasso Vaqueros Noosing a bear Fight between a bull and a bear Departure from Monterey Indian horse stealers Outrages committed by the travellers Indignation of Captain Bonneville
The white road climbed like a white cat; it spanned sunless chasms like a tight-rope; it was flung round far-off headlands like a lasso.
The captain of the airship watching this quarter seems to have stooped to lasso and drag from its staff a flag hoisted upon Morgan Hall.
How was one to lasso her mind, and tether it to this minute, unimportant spot?
He ran his mind along the line of conservative policy, which went steadily from Lord Salisbury to Alfred, and gradually enclosed, as though it were a lasso that opened and caught things, enormous chunks of the habitable globe.
Yet, with it all, she was a wild thing, alert, suspicious of the lasso, nosing it in every man's hand, more curious about it than about aught else in the world; her quivering delight was to see it cast for her, her game to elude it; so mettlesome was she that she loved it to be cast fair that she might escape as it was closing round her; she scorned, however her heart might be beating, to run from her pursuers; she took only the one step backward, which still left her near them but always out of reach; her head on high now, but her face as friendly, her manner as gracious as before, she is yours for the catching.